May 26, 2010
7
1
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Hello all,

I am a practicing PT in Wisconsin going on five years. I work in an outpatient hospital based facility as a salaried PT. I have seen a lot of changes over the past years basically it boils down to I go into work early, work through my lunch break doing notes, and leave late every day. I average about 48-50 hours per week and many of my salaried colleagues work 50+ hours a week. My current salary is in the upper $60K range but when you factor in the extra hours I really only make around $25.00 per hour considering all the extra time I am putting in- and I am one of the most efficient and productive therapists in my department I usually am 85-100% productive. It doesn't seem like the hourly PTs have it any better in the area as well as I have some colleagues who told me they are expected to clock out for 45 minutes or 1 hour if they have a patient that cancels and the office staff was unable to fill it which I think is ridiculous.

I take many short cuts with patient care and I even also stop 5-10 minutes early for each appointment in order to try and finish on time but when your employer gives you no paperwork time and writing or dictating progress/insurance/DC notes it is just too much to do in 40 hours with the amount of patients my employer expects you to see. Now I wouldn't care if I was making $90 or 100K a year but I am certainly not. It seems like the bottom line or employer expectation is see more patients, bill more, and keep trying to improve your productivity which is the main pressure that myself and many of my colleagues feel. If this is the norm I don't think I can handle this kind of work at full-time until I am able to retire!!! I will definitely burn out and more and more PTs I know are trying to decrease their hours as soon as they can.

I am curious to know what other PTs are seeing and what the students are seeing when they shadow various PTs. Maybe the expectations around here are different compared to other regions?

PTboy
 
M

myr11

As a 2nd year DPT student in New York I'll share what I have seen having been in the field for the last 4 years as an aide, observing, volunteering, and doing my clinical affiliations...After asking all of my mentors what to expect as a starting salary in the New York metro area I would say the avg number is $65,000 for a salaried 35-40 hour a week position with some type of benefits package. The settings I am getting this info from are a hospital owned outpatient ortho clinic, a nursing home, hospitals, and private clinics. I have worked with a lot of ambitious young PTs who all seem to be doing additional work in home care or part time positions who probably are pulling in CLOSER to six figures in their early 30's working probably at least 50 hours a week. Of course there are probably many more opportunities in New York then in Wisconsin, and the cost of living is so much higher! So it is probably really not THAT different but if I were you I would think it is time to make a change. You should not be sacrificing your patient's care because of this. Time for a meeting with your supervisor or seeking out a new position. If you were in my location you are definitely being under paid by $5,000-10,000 a year. With 5 years in you should have more freedom to get creative with your career and find a position where you can make a few more bucks and still enjoy your work, may just have to be a little flexible...TIME FOR A CHANGE! No offense but you are not benefiting yourself or the field by continuing to work in such a position where patient's are not able to receive adequate care nor are you!
 

lee9786

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Feb 3, 2009
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Ok so your going to hate me for everything I am about to say but I am going to say it anyway…
First of all are you serious… did you not know going in to PT or going through PT school that depending on the area of PT your work you may work more than the “average” 40 hour week? Secondly 50 hours a week is 8—6:30 with a 1 hour lunch break 5 days a week is not bad at all… most everyone in the world would give a limb or an organ or child to have worked that for 60+ a year ( I can give you statistics for this if you would like). I have never in my entire life heard anyone complain about working that for that amazing pay. Do you know how lucky you really are?? Seriously. I guess I may be more cultured than most but you have no ****ing idea how lucky you are. Sorry to get so political on you but really… what PT school did you go to that they left you so unprepared for what you were about to do?
And my second point I have spent the past 10 years observing PT because I dedicated to the field of PT, it is my passion. I have observed or worked as an aide for over 8,000 hours… I know that may not compare to your work experience since you are a PT but I have worked in 25+ different clinics in 5 different states and 3 different countries. I have only once seen a PT that feels like you. That was also in an outpatient privately owned clinic. Also that PT had no passion at all for what they did they just “happened to have found an easy way to work in health care” are his exact words. I truly believe if you are in the right profession for you then you would not be having these problems.
And also if you are wanting to live this lavish lifestyle you talk about then once again what PT school did you go to that did not inform you of the pay PTs will make? What did you think you were going to make 3x what any PT in the world actually makes? I guess I just don’t get it. it sounds like you are a PT working a normal PT job and making an average PT salary… so you expected what? To be offered a surgeons pay?
And finally you your really gave a **** about your patients you would not be cutting your appointments with them so that you could leave 5-10 minutes earlier. I could not imagine doing that to any patient. Are you not in PT for the patients? Because if you are not then please do not practice PT.
Why not contribute to the discussion as opposed to spouting out a diatribe?

OP I think the healthcare landscape is drastically changing. I really don't think how things are now will be how they will be ten years from now. I have no idea what the results will be, only ideas based on trends. Take all of this from a pre-PT that doesn't know any better, but from what I see there are drastic changes ahead.

Fee-For-Service may be coming to an end, at least from a third-party payer perspective. What makes me think this is Medicare, and the American government are broke. Not only are we broke, but we are massively in debt, borrowing to sustain our entitlement programs. On top of this it looks like we will have sustained ten percent unemployment for some time, which is problematic for funding the entitlement programs which pre-recession already had a precarious prognosis.

Currently the answer is decrease payments to providers via physician fee schedule and MPPR. While congress is looking to do this, Physicians are threatening (and are) dropping Medicare patients. HUGE problem ahead without a clear-cut answer, and will most likely result in a paradigm shift in Medicare from FFS to P4P IMO.

The Affordable Care Act has a number of trial projects going on. One of the most touted systems is this Accountable Care Organization. The reason being a shift from FFS to P4P. As opposed to provider payments incentivizing more services, it's incentivizing less costs. What the ramifications are to quality I do not know. I do know you need choice, but governments don't provide that. This concept would have to be accepted by private payers, which unfortunately continue to merge but that's another post (huge failure ahead.) I will say that the public will most likely be blaming capitalism due to these mergers and be begging for government-run single payer healthcare (which I think is terrifying.) Insert universial Medicare, which due to a failure of FFS, government-run ACOs might be the future.

Now I'd love to hear from others how the role of PTs might change. ACOs would be like HMOs with physicians as the "gatekeeper" which could be unfortunate for PTs unless they can contract outside of them. I think their could be some great potential for PTs if they demonstrate significant cost savings. This could provide an opportunity for ATCs to gain market share in physician settings with orthopedic physicians. What do you think?
 
Nov 3, 2010
203
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Why not contribute to the discussion as opposed to spouting out a diatribe?
+1 :thumbup: for calling this out.

2nd poster is creating way too many presumptions, and cannot really know the OP's mentality from just a single post. I've chatted with professionals who make 2-3x a PT's salary and still complain about how it does not pay enough for what they do. What makes you think physical therapists aren't immune to salary issues just the same as other workers? What about PT's who jump to MD's eventually after burnout. Is it not reasonable that some don't believe they are being compensated/ appreciated enough for what they do? Similar scenarios happen throughout the work-world. Plus, this balance is a struggle in other mid-level health-care positions too. A whole tirade of self-righteous scolding is quite unnecessary.


This could provide an opportunity for ATCs to gain market share in physician settings with orthopedic physicians. What do you think?
I actually can believe the real possibility that some of the scenarios may well play out. This comment I'm not sold on the surface. Perhaps you could better explain the reasoning that sparked the opinion, because as of now, I don't fully understand why?

Firstly, what do you think the market for orthopedic physicians and surgeons whose work relates to a purely athletic origin/case for treatment? Is there any stats on percentages of what current treatment by these physicians deals with athletes? I can tell you I haven't looked for studies to know these sort of stats.

I perhaps could see how ATC could potentially try to position for cost savings by charging less. But if you were referring to orthopedic physicians using ATC's for treatment of non-athletes what makes them more qualified in treatment over a physical therapist? How do Athletic Trainers separate themselves from 'athletics' to work with a more general population base? Basically, how do they escape Sports Medicine field? How do they get around designated issues of billing for PT? If PT's are best positioned to bill for PT today and still have some hangups, what then is an ATC's ability to bill without becoming an extremely uphill battle?

The degree name and training alone seems more appropriate for work on-site with sports. I mean at the sidelines ect. which they excel I'm sure. However, PT's seem best suited in training for the rehabilitation clinic for the most part. Actually, if ATC's were actually aimed to be positioned as a cost cutting measure, why not a more sensible PTA extender model with supervision under a PT?

Maybe, I'm not picking up with what you meant by this single sentence question. I'm trying to understand your thoughts, so feel free to shoot back a reply.
 
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lee9786

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Feb 3, 2009
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+1 :thumbup: for calling this out.

2nd poster is creating way too many presumptions, and cannot really know the OP's mentality from just a single post. I've chatted with professionals who make 2-3x a PT's salary and still complain about how it does not pay enough for what they do. What makes you think physical therapists aren't immune to salary issues just the same as other workers? What about PT's who jump to MD's eventually after burnout. Is it not reasonable that some don't believe they are being compensated/ appreciated enough for what they do? Similar scenarios happen throughout the work-world. Plus, this balance is a struggle in other mid-level health-care positions too. A whole tirade of self-righteous scolding is quite unnecessary.




I actually can believe the real possibility that some of the scenarios may well play out. This comment I'm not sold on the surface. Perhaps you could better explain the reasoning that sparked the opinion, because as of now, I don't fully understand why?

Firstly, what do you think the market for orthopedic physicians and surgeons whose work relates to a purely athletic origin/case for treatment? Is there any stats on percentages of what current treatment by these physicians deals with athletes? I can tell you I haven't looked for studies to know these sort of stats.

I perhaps could see how ATC could potentially try to position for cost savings by charging less. But if you were referring to orthopedic physicians using ATC's for treatment of non-athletes what makes them more qualified in treatment over a physical therapist? How do Athletic Trainers separate themselves from 'athletics' to work with a more general population base? Basically, how do they escape Sports Medicine field? How do they get around designated issues of billing for PT? If PT's are best positioned to bill for PT today and still have some hangups, what then is an ATC's ability to bill without becoming an extremely uphill battle?

The degree name and training alone seems more appropriate for work on-site with sports. I mean at the sidelines ect. which they excel I'm sure. However, PT's seem best suited in training for the rehabilitation clinic for the most part. Actually, if ATC's were actually aimed to be positioned as a cost cutting measure, why not a more sensible PTA extender model with supervision under a PT?

Maybe, I'm not picking up with what you meant by this single sentence question. I'm trying to understand your thoughts, so feel free to shoot back a reply.
Well ATCs have been increasing their educational background as well. NATA is looking to expand scope past just athletes to the general healthy population. I believe they already have been successful in doing it. From what I grasp, ATCs are currently working in offices of orthopedic physicians rehabing patients - patients that could be referred out to PTs. NATA has also successfully encroached in areas of manual therapy.


"DALLAS, September 25, 2009 – The National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) announced today that an out-of-court settlement was reached in its Fair Practice Lawsuit against the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) on Sept. 21, 2009. The NATA filed suit against the APTA for antitrust violations that unfairly restricted athletic trainers from practicing manual therapy and gaining access to continuing education courses on manual therapy. The case was scheduled for a status and scheduling hearing in Federal District Court in Dallas on Sept. 22."
http://www.nata.org/NR092509

One thing to think about that I have anyways... as PTs move towards autonomous practice and away from working underneath physicians, it may provide an opportunity for professions such as the ATCs to move in such as in orthopedics. They may be limited to the generally "healthy" population, but from what I understand this is already happening in orthopedic physician offices. I could be wrong though. No stats just hearsay.

From what I grasp, MTs are also attempting to encroach on PT practice a they are would like to perform joint mobilizations. Currently they are limited to soft tissue.

So there are "turf" battles regarding scope in the healthcare political world working for and against PT practice.
 

TheOx777

Moderator Emeritus
Jun 25, 2010
477
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I really can't speak on your specific situation. I do know that it is extremely difficult and possibly dangerous to over generalize one's personal experience and try to assign that experience to the entire field. I have heard so many conflicting viewpoints about PT and where the field is going. Some people seem to be "uber" excited, while others down right hate it. There is a third party who is stuck in the middle. I am a grad student who will be entering a DPT program next year. There is a sense of novelty and excitement for me. That said, I am a little older, have worked for several years, will already have a M.S., and may have a little more life experience than some of my future classmates. I will be 25/26 when I enter DPT school. I do recognize that things are not always as they appear.

If money is the issue, which it almost always is then your location probably does not help. I know the Mid-west has a lower cost of living than the coasts, and that is mirrored by the salaries one makes. I am from the east coast(Philadelphia) and I know that 60K-75K may be a starting salary for many DPTs in the mid-atlantic region. Salaries of 80-95K are not at all uncommon for a person with your experience. Is that breaking the bank? That depends on who you ask, but as a PT I wouldn't expect to make too much more than 100K unless you work more than 40 hours or are in a more affluent location. For example, I have seen job postings in parts of NJ for 150K+ plus benefits.:eek:.

Bottom line: If your unhappiness with your current situation is affecting you so much that patient care is suffering then a change is certainly needed. That may not necessarily mean a change in profession. You may want to explore other options in PT i.e. another facility, home health, or even leaving Wisconsin if that is even an option. I know that working your tail off and feeling under-appreciated with a less than desirable salary sucks! If I were you, I would assess my options and look to improve my situation. I can't give you specifics because I am not you and I don't know exactly what you want. I hope you find what you are looking for. Best wishes to you!:thumbup:
 

jbizzle

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Dec 19, 2008
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I do know that it is extremely difficult and possibly dangerous to over generalize one's personal experience and try to assign that experience to the entire field.
I did this earlier this cycle. Reading thhreads about people going from DPT to MD or DO, or people leaving PT school. I've learned my lesson and I really do have a passion for this field.

And I will be 25/26 when I start also. Dang I'm old!
 
Nov 3, 2010
203
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Rehab Sci Student
ATC related
Thanks for posting, I may look further into it in the future. I'm not sure yet how I feel about the situation... Every profession consistently fighting turf wars with another is a poor side effect of our system. Looks like everyone wants a shot at the already battered and bludgeoned rehabilitation field. I worry sometimes it will be squeezed dry. I hope I won't be forced to reconsider to PA avenue. :shrug:
 
Oct 13, 2010
44
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Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Reading threads about people going from DPT to MD or DO, or people leaving PT school. I've learned my lesson and I really do have a passion for this field.

And I will be 25/26 when I start also. Dang I'm old!
These threads scared me too. I really had to take a step back and think about what I was doing, especially since I'd be incurring a whole lot of debt if I decided to go down the DPT road. In the end, I am extremely passionate about the field and can't think of something I'd love to do more. I never had this level of excitement for a career...EVER.

Hey don't go slinging that word "old" around ;) I'm turning 30 in Jan and will just be starting my 3 semesters of prereqs; by the time I'm (hopefully) in grad school I will be 31 :eek:
 

jbizzle

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Hey don't go slinging that word "old" around ;) I'm turning 30 in Jan and will just be starting my 3 semesters of prereqs; by the time I'm (hopefully) in grad school I will be 31 :eek:
I've heard that before! No! You're old. HAHAHAHAHAHAH!!!!! C'mon im just playing!!!!Just curious are you pre-med or pre-DPT?
 
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lee9786

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Thanks for posting, I may look further into it in the future. I'm not sure yet how I feel about the situation... Every profession consistently fighting turf wars with another is a poor side effect of our system. Looks like everyone wants a shot at the already battered and bludgeoned rehabilitation field. I worry sometimes it will be squeezed dry. I hope I won't be forced to reconsider to PA avenue. :shrug:
It's been a challenge reading between the lines. I guess it goes both ways according to the bls.gov, ATCs held ~16,000 jobs in 2008 with around 40 percent working in a health care setting. PTs held around 185,000; so they have a way to go. While ATCs and MTs might be gaining some market share on PT, PTs are gaining share on the chiro profession. In fact I think it's a very good possibility that PTs could displace the Chiropractic profession entirely as they see PTs as their number one threat. Of course I think their biggest threat is within. Time to step into the 21st century of musculoskeletal rehab. So that's about fifty-thousand jobs added to outpatient orthopedic. There is a market of those who want to fix the problem with no chemicals or saws so their is a niche here for PTs to take this over.

There is definitely a concern in the field other professions claiming they can perform "Physical Therapy." That was probably a big reason the RC15-10 didn't pass. http://blog.myphysicaltherapyspace.com/2010/05/rc-15-10-and-incident-to-billing.html Basically it was about PTs being able to delegate to extenders that they choose -not just PTAs. This would include ATCs and LMTs, but the concern was a potential decrease in third-party reimbursement as well as possible encroachment on practice. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Interesting enough there was talk on that board regarding PTAs branching off from the APTA. It might have been just a few people's opinion, but I found that very interesting. Say a provision such as RC 15-10 passes, PTAs get upset (it would hurt them the most, APTA not representing them yada yada) and initiate their own governing body. The speculation of an increase of PTA to the BS degree could occur as well as a name change, and then they could lobby that they can do "physical therapy." Anyways I'm probably way off here, I do find this notion interesting though.

So yeah rehab's a mess. I guess things will start playing out when true Medicare and Healthcare overhaul start to take hold (probably when we finally get out with our DPT degree :eek:) I think it's in a decent position though. One thing I think we can all be certain about is what you see now is probably not what we'll see even five years from now. Things are changing rapidly.
 
May 19, 2009
133
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The future is bright. Hold the course... become the most knowledgeable and best therapist you can be and all will be more than well.
 

Hopein2010

DPT
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Jun 10, 2010
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Wow, really?

Anyways and moving on, to Ptboy:

I have seen and felt what you are experiencing. It is extremely frustrating for those of us who truly have a passion and desire to help people, to be governed by unrealistic productivity expectations, for example. Many of my co-workers felt this way as well, working so very hard to please the higher-ups, and at the same time, somehow feeling like the patients got short-changed (let's face it, one on one for all of them would be awesome!!).

It is not like this everywhere or in all settings. I've worked in OP where the rule was to dovetail consistently all day, and also in OP where pt's got their own half hour slots. Same in SNF, and of course in acute and HH, pt's are seen one on one.

I think us Licensed PT's and PTA's (like myself) are under alot of pressure to meet expectations, but like we all know, its not like this everywhere. Have you thought of switching to a different setting or company?

Hope it gets better for you :thumbup:
 

jbizzle

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Wow, really?
Yeah, 10 piece Mcnuggets for $1.99.


No I wasn't done...I found this old post from PTboy:

Hello to all,

I am a PT with almost four years of experience and I know this is a growing concern among many of the interns and students that I meet in the hospital. I STRONGLY AGREE with what ericdopt has recommended. I graduated with a MSPT degree and was only $20K in debt total including both undergraduate and graduate degrees. However, I also worked 2 jobs during undergrad and saved up for PT school working several years as a rehab aid - I took a few years off before going to grad school.
During the first semester of grad school my class received financial advising and all of the advisors strongly recommended that as a GENERAL RULE OF THUMB A STUDENT SHOULD NEVER GO INTO MORE DEBT THAN WHAT HE/SHE CAN EXPECT TO MAKE IN HIS/HER FIRST YEAR OF EMPLOYMENT. Basically most of us just laughed because many of my friends had already exceeded that figure since most of us expected to start in the $55K to 65K fresh out of grad school. So the bottom line is that unfortunately PT programs are very expensive and I am glad that I did what I did but if I had to do it all over again and take out around $100k or more in debt I would not do it.

I am one of those very busy PTs who works full-time in an outpatient ortho hospital and I also work PRN at a private nursing home so my total combined income is always a six digit figure and I am doing this to pay my student loans/mortgage off quickly but this is very challenging at times and can really burn out any PT. Of course one can always live a very simple lifestyle after graduating from PT school, however, also consider that you went to school for a long time and many new grads typically are in the beginning stages of either getting married or considering starting a family in a few years and many need new cars or have to also pay off credit card debt, etc. So it may seem that it would be very easy to live cheap and pay so much more towards your loans but believe me as a beginning PT unexpected things always happen with one's car, house, health, etc. and it's always nice to have a little in savings for emergency purposes.
So as my simple pearls of wisdom I would recommend to all future PT/OT/rehab students to try and set a limit on the amount of debt that you are willing to acrue and try to stick with it - for me I would not want to go over $80K for both undergrad and graduate school and I know with the DPT degree that is extremely hard but I lived at home with my parents during undergrad and worked 2 jobs during undergrad and paid for all of my undergrd myself so that way I had no loans accruing interest during grad school.
I would also recommend to students who are contemplating various careers in allied health to also considers technical colleges that offer associate degrees or universities that offer B.S. degrees in allied health fields such as diagnostic medical sonography which usually has a really good return on your college investment (I know because I actually got very concerned with the amount of debt that I would possibly acrue with grad school and was accepted into an advanced placement medical sonography program but then decided that PT would be a better fit for me).
Lastly, I do not want to sound pessimistic but I feel that sometimes students do not fully realize the impact of accruing an enormous mountain of debt in a field that will typically pay anywhere from 60 to 70K starting out. Overall PT is a very rewarding field and you always have a day job which is really nice for raising a family and helping others succeed and heal is very self-rewarding in an of itself. One last piece of advice is to try and take the cheapest route to getting your PT degree because the bottom line is that an employer will pay you the same regardless of where you got your degree and as long as new grads choose work environments that foster a strong atmosphere of mentoring and team work you should excel.

Good luck to all who are considering a career in rehab but truly make sure this is what you want because a successful student truly needs a strong desire to become a PT or OT because this will be the fuel you need to keep you going for all of those late nights studying in grad school.

Josh, PT
So I guess something happened...he burnt out I guess. Damn seeing post like this really does scare me.
 
OP
P
May 26, 2010
7
1
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To DPTform2,

You made a lot of negative assumptions about me. First of all I am a compassionate PT who cares a lot about my patients. I work for a nonprofit hospital and also do pro bono services and community volunteering for the organization. I have booked patients during my lunchbreak and even after my shift for patients who are having serious problems who were unable to see a PT. I am a certified APTA instructor and I have a total of 8 years in PT as I was also an aide for several years and being an aide is not even close to the amount of responsibility and productivity pressure an average PT has.
Furthermore, I do take short cuts but these do not jeopardize patient care. I usually do a lot of gross assessments for ROM vs goni measuring and do more modified special tests to save time. I usually try to stop 5 minutes early before seeing the next patient per the recommendation of my employer because we no longer have any paperwork time and they do not want PTs getting burned out and leaving which is already happening. I usually also mentor new grads as I have a very diverse caseload and my employer likes how I handle an extremely busy caseload and I get a lot of patients within the community that request me. So the next time you jump on somebody and attack them you should first know the details before just making ridiculous and absurd assumptions. You have a lot to learn and once you go through grad school and start practicing you will see things in a different perspective, trust me. In PT school they try to make things as black and white as possible for simplicity, but the longer you practice the more you realize that there is a lot of gray in healthcare.
I am not trying to live a "lavish" lifestyle as you call it. I just want to work and make enough to have a decent home and provide adequately for my family but also have enough time to also enjoy the family lifestyle. That's all and I obviously realize PTs don't get rich, I didn't go into the field for the money. I went into it to help people but there comes a point when you can only give so much and I know times are tough but it seems that more and more organizations/hospitals are just pushing clinicians, not just PTs, to work at a level that is just not very sustainable in the long run.
 

jbizzle

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As a 2nd year DPT student in New York I'll share what I have seen having been in the field for the last 4 years as an aide, observing, volunteering, and doing my clinical affiliations...After asking all of my mentors what to expect as a starting salary in the New York metro area I would say the avg number is $65,000 for a salaried 35-40 hour a week position with some type of benefits package. The settings I am getting this info from are a hospital owned outpatient ortho clinic, a nursing home, hospitals, and private clinics. I have worked with a lot of ambitious young PTs who all seem to be doing additional work in home care or part time positions who probably are pulling in CLOSER to six figures in their early 30's working probably at least 50 hours a week. Of course there are probably many more opportunities in New York then in Wisconsin, and the cost of living is so much higher! So it is probably really not THAT different but if I were you I would think it is time to make a change. You should not be sacrificing your patient's care because of this. Time for a meeting with your supervisor or seeking out a new position. If you were in my location you are definitely being under paid by $5,000-10,000 a year. With 5 years in you should have more freedom to get creative with your career and find a position where you can make a few more bucks and still enjoy your work, may just have to be a little flexible...TIME FOR A CHANGE! No offense but you are not benefiting yourself or the field by continuing to work in such a position where patient's are not able to receive adequate care nor are you!
Hey MYR11, I was reading really old post, from the very last page of this forum, and saw that you plan on going to med school after PT school. Is this still your plan?
 
M

myr11

Hey MYR11, I was reading really old post, from the very last page of this forum, and saw that you plan on going to med school after PT school. Is this still your plan?
At this point it is not my "plan" to go on to medical school after PT school but I am and will consider anything and everything depending on how I feel after my next year and a half in PT school...All I know is right now finals are about to begin and PT school is enough to keep my mind occupied! It is hard right now for me to consider all the extra debt and schooling for med school! PT school is NOOOOOOT easy, or at least my program certainly isn't (and we have plenty of students who could probably be in medical school right now)...
 

jbizzle

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PT school is NOOOOOOT easy, or at least my program certainly isn't (and we have plenty of students who could probably be in medical school right now)...
Oh yessir. Believe me, I know its not easy.
 

markelmarcel

7+ Year Member
Dec 17, 2009
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The future is bright. Hold the course... become the most knowledgeable and best therapist you can be and all will be more than well.

I think more people need to read this and believe it. Thank you for the positive message. :)