unicorn06

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2005
279
0
Status
Kaplan vs. Princeton review?

Has anyone taught or tutored for either? Any reason to apply to work for one over the other?

What is the tutor/teacher training like? Is there a minimum number of hours or length of time you have to work after completeing the training?
 

aumed22

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 19, 2004
199
1
Status
Kaplan. You get paid more (when you combine in class and out of class hours for each class). What other reason do you need?
 

carrie

Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 25, 2005
34
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
I like teaching for Princeton Review because you can teach a particular subject and not the whole course...so if you're good at biology you can just teach that! In order to qualify they have to know your MCAT score, you have to have an interview and you need to go through training for a weekend (where you teach a lesson). Based on how you do in all of these factors you are then selected to be a teacher. I know Princeton Review is always looking for people.
 
OP
U

unicorn06

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2005
279
0
Status
aumed22 said:
Kaplan. You get paid more (when you combine in class and out of class hours for each class). What other reason do you need?
What are the differences in hourly pay? I thought it was $15-50/hr depending on experience with both companies. Does Kaplan but not Princeton Review pay for prep time?
 

Dr. Swan

MCW Class of 2010
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 9, 2005
14
0
37
Minneapolis
Status
Non-Student
TPR does not pay prep-time. It makes for alot of work the first time around, but subsequent class cycles are easier (obviously -- just save those lecture notes!).

I have a friend who just finished training this past weekend for Kaplan, and have heard through the rumor-mill that they give you the lecture-prep material. Personally, since I found the actual prepping to be the worst part of the TPR experience, this could have swayed me towards Kaplan. As a note of clarification, you wish to teach bio at TPR, for instance, you do not need an excellent bio score on the MCAT (based on a friend's anecdotal evidence).

In regards to training, I believe that both are just one weekend of training and then you have a class of your own (I know this to be true at TPR). I believe they pay their beginning instructors about the same as well, about $20/hour to teach, and less for proctoring.
 

Chinorean

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 22, 2005
651
1
Status
unicorn06 said:
What are the differences in hourly pay? I thought it was $15-50/hr depending on experience with both companies. Does Kaplan but not Princeton Review pay for prep time?

Apply to both and see which one accepts you first. A lot of it is supply and demand--if they have a lot of teachers they might not pick you. As for pay, compensation is based on your degree of education and what type of course you're teaching. SAT makes less than MCAT, college students make less than college graduates. I believe both have paid training, not sure about prep time.
 

ahumdinger

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2005
759
1
Status
Medical Student
I teach for kaplan and my boyfriend teaches for TPR. It's his 2nd time doing it so he's got the notes all done, but it seems like he had to do a lot more work the first time around than I do now (this is my first time). Kaplan standardizes all their courses (all over the country) to allow students to be able to attend classes elsewhere (say you go on vacation one week across the country- you can jump in on a course) so the teacher manuals are all the same, and you just have to "prep" the manuals-- basically go through and highlight and make notes and know what you're gonna say in class. But all the material's there. you don't have to design your own lecture for Kaplan, but you do for TPR.
 

jebus

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2005
2,526
6
Status
ahumdinger said:
I teach for kaplan....
Not to pry, but what are the minimum scores you need to teach at kaplan? (there's no TPR where I live, but I would prefer to teach there.)
 

Will Ferrell

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2004
778
2
Status
desiredusername said:
Not to pry, but what are the minimum scores you need to teach at kaplan? (there's no TPR where I live, but I would prefer to teach there.)
90th percentile
 

jebus

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 22, 2005
2,526
6
Status
Will Ferrell said:
90th percentile
Well, you're quick. Thanks. I've got some serious drinking - er, thinking to do. Oh, can't it be both?
 

etudiante04

phenomenal
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2005
327
0
Status
What is the minimum for princeton review?


I have a friend who just finished training this past weekend for Kaplan, and have heard through the rumor-mill that they give you the lecture-prep material. Personally, since I found the actual prepping to be the worst part of the TPR experience, this could have swayed me towards Kaplan. As a note of clarification, you wish to teach bio at TPR, for instance, you do not need an excellent bio score on the MCAT (based on a friend's anecdotal evidence).
 

Will Ferrell

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2004
778
2
Status
ti89 said:
In each section or overall?
Actually, I think it's by the section you will teach if you're specializing (that's what i was told). It would be a crime if people paid me to teach verbal/writing.
 

mintendo

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2005
504
1
Status
Actually TPR does pay for the time you spend on preparing for classes, but you don't get paid right away. For example, if you taught for the August MCAT, and you decide to go back to TPR to teach the April test, they'll pay you $150 for the prep time. It's just another incentive for you to go back to them.
 

Dr. Swan

MCW Class of 2010
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 9, 2005
14
0
37
Minneapolis
Status
Non-Student
etudiante04 ,

I was hired in a rush and left the job soon thereafter, so I did not really go through the normal routines. But I hear TPR sets a minimum of a 10 on the MCAT, preferring an 11 on the section you wish to teach. Perhaps someone could verify this..
 

JayQuah

Connect Four Champion
10+ Year Member
Jun 15, 2005
502
1
36
Kahl ee phone ya
Status
Kaplan Teacher Here
Gotta have 12's in any section you want to teach. They pay you for prep time (7 bucks an hour), and MCAT teachers get paid more than SAT teachers, obiviously.
They give you the lecture notes.
They always need MCAT teachers.
Kan't go wrong with Kaplan.
 

thefafo

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 12, 2005
129
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I'm a teacher and student advisor at Kaplan. You don't necessarily have to have a 12 in each section to teach there, I've seen people with 11s. They prefer to hire people in the 95th percentile, but there's such a high turnover for MCAT teachers they end up needing a lot of people. The training was 3-4 hour sessions, once a week for a month. Kaplan also varies between specialist teachers (teaching only on subject) and general teachers (teaching all supjects). At my center, they have specialists right now. I enjoy working at Kaplan, the prep isn't too bad, just time consuming the first time around.
 

mintendo

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2005
504
1
Status
for all the TPR/Kaplan teachers out there: did you guys put your MCAT teaching experience on your med school application? do you think it helped?
anyone get asked about their TPR/Kaplan job during their interviews?
 

ahumdinger

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2005
759
1
Status
Medical Student
mintendo said:
for all the TPR/Kaplan teachers out there: did you guys put your MCAT teaching experience on your med school application? do you think it helped?
anyone get asked about their TPR/Kaplan job during their interviews?
I just started teaching at Kaplan, so it was not on my AMCAS. I think it's a great addition to any application because it shows that you have not only mastered the material for the exam, but you can teach it to others. It's the whole "see one, do one, teach one" thing. I've made sure to bring it up during interview. I think it's an especially strong skill to have, especially for PBL schools, where much of the teaching comes from your peers.