oompa loompa

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So I think my best bet is to get a cheap toshiba laptop (~$600) that has a single core processor (I guess single core is equivalent to Pentium M?) and I plan to keep it around 4-5 years. HOWEVER, everyone tells me single core processors are so 3 years ago and I'll regret not getting a duo core processor...I tell them I'm not a gamer and will just use the laptop for school purposes, but they still tell me I should get a core duo. I really cannot afford to waste money on technology I won't use...What do you all think?

I actually just returned a really nice Lenovo T60 laptop because I realized what a ripoff it was ($1500). I wasn't terribly impressed with the core duo processor either...probably b/c I never run CPU-intensive apps.

I need to get a laptop ASAP so some quick input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 
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saradoor

oompa loompa said:
So I think my best bet is to get a cheap toshiba laptop (~$600) that has a single core processor (I guess single core is equivalent to Pentium M?) and I plan to keep it around 4-5 years. HOWEVER, everyone tells me single core processors are so 3 years ago and I'll regret not getting a duo core processor...I tell them I'm not a gamer and will just use the laptop for school purposes, but they still tell me I should get a core duo. I really cannot afford to waste money on technology I won't use...What do you all think?

I actually just returned a really nice Lenovo T60 laptop because I realized what a ripoff it was ($1500). I wasn't terribly impressed with the core duo processor either...probably b/c I never run CPU-intensive apps.

I need to get a laptop ASAP so some quick input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Size is more important. Duo core machines are in general heavier and is an overkill for what you need. In addition the duo core technology is in its first phase so do you want to be in a clinical trial :)
 

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There are sizeable speed differences between the duo and single core pentiums. Even when using word processing and office software. That being said, in 4-5 years both computers will be considered slow. Its really a patience thing, can you wait the few extra seconds everytime you open a large word document? If you can go with the single core, you'll notice a difference and it will aggravate you sometimes, but it might be worth it to save the money.

Also keeping your computer clean of bloatware will save you a lot of headaches. Remove preinstalled software that you are pretty sure you wont use.

Also, Press CTRL+ALT+DEL and make a list of all the processes running. Search for these at one of the many sites that have program databases. If they aren't useful, take the steps to remove them. Defrag your computer semi-regularly (I'm not sure if this applies so much for XP computers as it did in the 98 days).

Most people that complain their computers run slow because they are filled with P2P software, adware, spyware, etc.
 
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SanDiegoSOD

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saradoor said:
Size is more important. Duo core machines are in general heavier and is an overkill for what you need. In addition the duo core technology is in its first phase so do you want to be in a clinical trial :)

Duo core machines place two processors on a single chip, and therefore do not add weight compared to a single chip. In fact, a single core chip that comes from a duo core line is actually a duo core chip with one processor deactivated. So sorry, no weight savings with a single core. :)
 
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saradoor

SanDiegoSOD said:
Duo core machines place two processors on a single chip, and therefore do not add weight compared to a single chip. In fact, a single core chip that comes from a duo core line is actually a duo core chip with one processor deactivated. So sorry, no weight savings with a single core. :)
The additional weight comes from the cooling subcomponents and not the CPU per se. The CPU is light and I think everyone knows that. :)
 

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What could you possible need a high speed computer for? I don't imagine there is too much you'd need to do that couldn't be done on a machine that's already 2 years old. If you have time to play computer games or most things that require tons of power...I imagine you're soon to fall out of your program...
 

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I'm guessing the single core processers are the equivalent of the celeron processor, i.e. not very good. Because besides being slower they have a slower front side bus and less on board cache which is important for processing more information.

If you dont want to spend the money for the core duo, I'd try to find a good Pentium M (centrino) based system. One can probably be had for around 800 - 900 if you look around.

I think I saw the toshiba model I have for 899 (toshiba a105 s2716 I think) pentium M (centrino) 740 processor, 100 gb hd, 1 gb ram, 4 usb's, fire wire port, mememory card reader, etc...
 
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oompa loompa

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rup47 said:
I'm guessing the single core processers are the equivalent of the celeron processor, i.e. not very good. Because besides being slower they have a slower front side bus and less on board cache which is important for processing more information.

If you dont want to spend the money for the core duo, I'd try to find a good Pentium M (centrino) based system. One can probably be had for around 800 - 900 if you look around.

I think I saw the toshiba model I have for 899 (toshiba a105 s2716 I think) pentium M (centrino) 740 processor, 100 gb hd, 1 gb ram, 4 usb's, fire wire port, mememory card reader, etc...
so single core is not centrino? I'm confused because the ad says "intel centrino mobile technology", so I just assumed that single core = centrino = pentium M. The guy at Office Depot also explained that Celeron wasn't a very good processor, so I'm definitely not going with that! But then he started on this confusing explanation of the history of Pentium processors and how they changed their names and if I'm not mistaken, Single Core is a type of Pentium processor, just not sure if it's Pentium M.
 
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saradoor

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so single core is not centrino? I'm confused because the ad says "intel centrino mobile technology", so I just assumed that single core = centrino = pentium M. The guy at Office Depot also explained that Celeron wasn't a very good processor, so I'm definitely not going with that! But then he started on this confusing explanation of the history of Pentium processors and how they changed their names and if I'm not mistaken, Single Core is a type of Pentium processor, just not sure if it's Pentium M.
Every CPU is single core unless specified otherwise.
Celeron is a stripped-down version of the better performing Pentium and Celeron is slow.
Pentium M is the mobile version of Pentium but was designed specifically for laptops. Pentium M consumes less energy and emits less heat than the regular Pentium.

If you are not a gamer and just want a laptop for work, Pentium M is what you need.
 
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oompa loompa

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saradoor said:
Every CPU is single core unless specified otherwise.
Celeron is a stripped-down version of the better performing Pentium and Celeron is slow.
Pentium M is the mobile version of Pentium but was designed specifically for laptops. Pentium M consumes less energy and emits less heat than the regular Pentium.

If you are not a gamer and just want a laptop for work, Pentium M is what you need.
ok! thanks for the clarification. I will make sure the processor is Pentium M before I buy it :)
 
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oompa loompa

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umm, one last question: It doesn't specify whether the processor is Pentium M, but it seems to be faster than a Pentium M (1.86 GHz as opposed to 1.73 GHz...right?) Below is all the processor info I'm given:

Processor manufacturer: Intel
Processor type: Core Solo
Clock speed: 1.86 GHz
Processor features Enhanced SpeedStep technology, Execute Disable Bit capability, Power-optimized processor system bus

sorry if my questions seem ridiculous. I'm slow at learning this stuff...
 

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Celeron M and Pentium M are not that different. However, people see "Celeron" and think that it sucks.
Since all we need is a basic computer that can run IE or Mozilla, Word, Powerpoint, and open PDFs, anything will work. Hell, I would take my $100 Gateway laptop I got last year, which is only .75" thick (Celeron M fyi), if I weren't forced to buy a new one.
 
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saradoor

oompa loompa said:
umm, one last question: It doesn't specify whether the processor is Pentium M, but it seems to be faster than a Pentium M (1.86 GHz as opposed to 1.73 GHz...right?) Below is all the processor info I'm given:

Processor manufacturer: Intel
Processor type: Core Solo
Clock speed: 1.86 GHz
Processor features Enhanced SpeedStep technology, Execute Disable Bit capability, Power-optimized processor system bus

sorry if my questions seem ridiculous. I'm slow at learning this stuff...
Core Solo is the latest single core CPU for laptop and is *better* than Pentium M. Here is a link to the Intel page: http://www.intel.com/products/processor/index.htm?iid=HMPAGE+Header_2_Product_Processors
 
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What you should do is go to a site like tomshardware.com or anandtech.com and look at benchmarks for these processors. You are very unlikely to need a speed-demon like the core-duo if you aren't doing a lot of gaming or mulitmedia. The M chips are very fast and power efficient: great chips. But again, you can make your own informed decision by checking benchmarks.

Another thing to consider is ram and hard-drive speed. For hard-drive, many people get stuck with a 4400 rpm, which is a big drawback. Spend the extra cash for a 7200rpm and you won't regret it. Look for ram that is running at least 400mhz ddr.

As someone else said, the most important thing is to know how to keep your machine running clean; this will keep a potentially obsolete computer running fast. Know how to do minor registry edits, how to defrag and check for spyware, and how to reformat and do a fresh reinstall of windows every couple of years. I'm still running a 2.6C northwood, almost 3 years old, and it's still very fast, even for the newest games.
 

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anothermd said:
Celeron M and Pentium M are not that different. However, people see "Celeron" and think that it sucks.
Since all we need is a basic computer that can run IE or Mozilla, Word, Powerpoint, and open PDFs, anything will work. Hell, I would take my $100 Gateway laptop I got last year, which is only .75" thick (Celeron M fyi), if I weren't forced to buy a new one.
I'm pretty sure the reduced cache in the Cellies is quite a drawback.
 

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I posted this in the other laptop thread as well, but figured I'd put it in here also. For those who want a good 17 inch laptop, Dell Home is having a sale right now. There's 35% off $999 coupons that were emailed out to customers; if you don't have one, you can get one on ebay for like $1. You can pick up an E1705 for like $1070 now.
 

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oompa loompa said:
umm, one last question: It doesn't specify whether the processor is Pentium M, but it seems to be faster than a Pentium M (1.86 GHz as opposed to 1.73 GHz...right?) Below is all the processor info I'm given:

Processor manufacturer: Intel
Processor type: Core Solo
Clock speed: 1.86 GHz
Processor features Enhanced SpeedStep technology, Execute Disable Bit capability, Power-optimized processor system bus

sorry if my questions seem ridiculous. I'm slow at learning this stuff...
This means its the same architecture processor as the Core Duo, but as mentioned previously, the Core Solo simply has only one of the two cores activated. Hence it's a single core processor (what you normally think a processor as being) in the "Core" line of processors.
 

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I do some purchasing for the business I work for. I recently got a Dell with the following:

Inspiron e1405 (14.1 inch screen)

Intel Proc Duo (dual-core) T2500 Processor (2 GHz)
Windows XP Pro
1 GB Ram
Ultrasharp WXGA screen
100 Gig 7200RPM Harddrive
85 Whr battery
CD and DVD Burners
Enhanced DVD and CD Burning software
4 year on-site warranty
Adobe Elements 6.0
Intel Wireless card + bluetooth
$1,269 plus tax and shipping (total $1,354 after tax/shipping)

That's probably more than most of you will want to spend, but its a hell of a fast computer with a great warranty to make up for the shoddy Dell quality. Dell coupons are posted on many websites, including gotapex.com; the coupon I used was a $750 off a $1999 computer. A computer like this will easily serve one well all the way through med school.
 

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oompa loompa said:
So I think my best bet is to get a cheap toshiba laptop (~$600) that has a single core processor (I guess single core is equivalent to Pentium M?) and I plan to keep it around 4-5 years. HOWEVER, everyone tells me single core processors are so 3 years ago and I'll regret not getting a duo core processor...I tell them I'm not a gamer and will just use the laptop for school purposes, but they still tell me I should get a core duo. I really cannot afford to waste money on technology I won't use...What do you all think?

I actually just returned a really nice Lenovo T60 laptop because I realized what a ripoff it was ($1500). I wasn't terribly impressed with the core duo processor either...probably b/c I never run CPU-intensive apps.

I need to get a laptop ASAP so some quick input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
That's stupid. It's a marketing technique, and will not actually affect anything.
 

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oompa loompa said:
So I think my best bet is to get a cheap toshiba laptop (~$600) that has a single core processor (I guess single core is equivalent to Pentium M?) and I plan to keep it around 4-5 years. HOWEVER, everyone tells me single core processors are so 3 years ago and I'll regret not getting a duo core processor...I tell them I'm not a gamer and will just use the laptop for school purposes, but they still tell me I should get a core duo. I really cannot afford to waste money on technology I won't use...What do you all think?

I actually just returned a really nice Lenovo T60 laptop because I realized what a ripoff it was ($1500). I wasn't terribly impressed with the core duo processor either...probably b/c I never run CPU-intensive apps.

I need to get a laptop ASAP so some quick input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Hey, I'm typing this on my cheap Toshiba ($850 plus tax) Centrino processor notebook and could not be happier with my choice. I say just get the lightest laptop with the most stuff at a reasonable price.
 

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Although celerons and pentium (m) processors are a way cheaper than core duos, I'd advise you to buy a notebook as strong as you can afford - if you are using MS Win. Why? Next year, win Vista comes out, which requires a much stronger hardware configuration than XP does, so if you'd like to use it, you'll need a strong processor, an at least 128 MB graphic card, at least 512 MB RAM, etc. So if you can afford a core duo, buy it, it's worth its price imho. Anyway, you'll surely get on well with a Pentium M too, but be careful, the processor is not the only thing that matters when buying a notebook.
 

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Buy the smallest, lightest-weight notebook you can. Processing power is irrelevant when it comes to following along with powerpoints and doing typing. Don't make the mistake of buying a big, heavy, powerful notebook! It will be to big for you to want to carry it around, and it will become a glorified desktop.
 
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To answer your question...no it won't really matter for med school but if you have other applications probably. Most software you will run won't be very calculation intensive so you wouldn't notice a difference. Not like hitting enter on mupad and walking away for 2 hours while your laptop chugs along doing a calculation..I'd assume. Centrino to the person that asked is just a collection of intel parts tat are all combined together..wireless card, processor and something else..made to suppossedly save power. They use pentium M processors..original centrino at least. Celeron processors USED to be horrible and have a hard time shaking the name still for it...but they are essentially pentium M with a few things disabled now. They aren't the power hogs they used to be. I'd put a gig of ram in more than anything...and a decent hd. A ram upgrade will be very important with Vista and I suspect it'll require about a gig to run comfortably...512 would be ok but possibly a bit painful. I havent looked at prices but if it is 100 to 150 bucks more for a core duo..I say spring and get it..but if it is much more then just load up on ram and get a nice sized harddrive.
 

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MossPoh said:
To answer your question...no it won't really matter for med school but if you have other applications probably. Most software you will run won't be very calculation intensive so you wouldn't notice a difference. Not like hitting enter on mupad and walking away for 2 hours while your laptop chugs along doing a calculation..I'd assume. Centrino to the person that asked is just a collection of intel parts tat are all combined together..wireless card, processor and something else..made to suppossedly save power. They use pentium M processors..original centrino at least. Celeron processors USED to be horrible and have a hard time shaking the name still for it...but they are essentially pentium M with a few things disabled now. They aren't the power hogs they used to be. I'd put a gig of ram in more than anything...and a decent hd. A ram upgrade will be very important with Vista and I suspect it'll require about a gig to run comfortably...512 would be ok but possibly a bit painful. I havent looked at prices but if it is 100 to 150 bucks more for a core duo..I say spring and get it..but if it is much more then just load up on ram and get a nice sized harddrive.
Seconding everything the person above said.

Shameless plug for hot deals on fatwallet forums

Having used a dual core machine at work, I would say that its nearly un-noticeable except when I am opening one application like adobe photoshop and opening internet explorer while waiting for photoshop to load up. It's a nice convenience in that you dont have to sit there and wait for one app to load up before you can do something else, but that's about it. The dual core is MOST useful when one program crashes and takes a core hostage, which is when the other core can be tapped into during CTRL+ALT+DEL to kill the offending process thus releasing the hostage. Much more elegant and less destructive than holding down power button in a single CPU hard lock scenario.

Looking into the crystal ball, there's speculation that programs will eventually utilize dual core more and more, but that's not for a few years and it's hard to believe that med student apps will ever really push that envelope unless video games are in your suite of apps.
If you're thinking about the next bloated incarnation of WindowsXP that MSFT is rebadging as Windows Vista, just remember that being at the bleeding edge requires the ability to stanch the wound when it cuts you. I'd play the waiting game if it were me.

Oh, and the INTC nomenclature:
Centrino Mobile technology = Intel Pentium M + Intel 915 Motherboard + Wireless
Core Solo = New INTC name for a slightly "enhanced" version of single core Pentium M
Core Duo = New INTC name for 2 slightly "enhanced" Pentium M's slapped onto the same space as a single CPU
Centrino Solo = Intel Core Solo + Intel 9xx Motherboard + Wireless
Centrino Duo = Intel Core Duo + Intel 9xx Motherboard + Wireless

Just remember that the new Core 2 Duo for laptops is coming up this holiday season and if you really want a serious performance boost, then wait for this if you must.
 
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Sust said:
Just remember that the new Core 2 Duo for laptops is coming up this holiday season and if you really want a serious performance boost, then wait for this if you must.
Much sooner than that. It's looking like Apple might put the Merom chips (Core 2 Duo for laptops) in at the end of August or September.

Personally, I'm waiting for those chips to come out so that I can either get one (if it's cheap enough) or, more likely, snag a deal on an "older" Core Duo.
 

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grogdamighty said:
Much sooner than that. It's looking like Apple might put the Merom chips (Core 2 Duo for laptops) in at the end of August or September.

Personally, I'm waiting for those chips to come out so that I can either get one (if it's cheap enough) or, more likely, snag a deal on an "older" Core Duo.

From where did you hear that apple will come out with laptops with the new Merom chip this August or Sept?

Thanks
 

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The Core 2 Duo chips are coming out this week.
 

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PlasticMan said:
I posted this in the other laptop thread as well, but figured I'd put it in here also. For those who want a good 17 inch laptop, Dell Home is having a sale right now. There's 35% off $999 coupons that were emailed out to customers; if you don't have one, you can get one on ebay for like $1. You can pick up an E1705 for like $1070 now.
Yeah, I got that rediculous deal...this core duo is pretty sweet compared to my 5 year old pentuim 3 lappy
 

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tennisnr said:
Get a macbook!
i agree with this. i'd say roughly half of my class has macs of some flavor, and we're all enamored with them (especially now that syncing with windows mobile 5 devices is out, courtesy of mark/space's missing sync).

light? check. fast? check. runs os x and windows? check. price in line, especially with edu discounts? check.
 

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PlasticMan said:
I posted this in the other laptop thread as well, but figured I'd put it in here also. For those who want a good 17 inch laptop, Dell Home is having a sale right now. There's 35% off $999 coupons that were emailed out to customers; if you don't have one, you can get one on ebay for like $1. You can pick up an E1705 for like $1070 now.
Keep in mind that a 17 inch laptop is great as a desktop replacement, but pretty lousy if moved about frequently. The size and weight of the machine can really drag you down.
 

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For those who want Dells, here are free coupon codes that shave off 30-50% off Dimensions and Inspirons. They are updated all the time:

http://www.xpbargains.com/dell_coupons/

For Macbooks, go to the Education Store online and get a discount that way. You'll also get a free Nano iPod if you buy a mac through Sept 16.
 
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amy2003uva said:
For those who want Dells, here are free coupon codes that shave off 30-50% off Dimensions and Inspirons. They are updated all the time:

http://www.xpbargains.com/dell_coupons/

For Macbooks, go to the Education Store online and get a discount that way. You'll also get a free Nano iPod if you buy a mac through Sept 16.
I would seriously suggest not considering Dell. I have had my laptop for barely two years and the LCD screen stopped working. I spent $1500 on the computer and had to spend another $300 to get the LCD screen fixed (Dell wanted to charge me $500, but I was able to get them to reduce the price). I have been without my computer for two weeks and finally got it back today only to find out that it still is not working. The box that Dell shipped it back to me in looks like it was retrieved from a dumpster. DHL came to pick up the computer again and it is on its way back to Dell's repair center.

I have spent the last month dealing with this issue between trying to work out a deal with Dell that I could afford and finding out what is going on with my computer. Their customer support is completely inept and apathetic to customer problems. I even had to file a complaint about one particular rep that was very rude and inappropriate to me. Everything with Dell seems so esoteric and no one takes accountability for anything, they simply transfer the call. I will certainly go with an Apple computer before I start medical school.
 

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Dude!

A pentium II 180+ Mhz will do, running at about $60 at Ebay

:laugh:

I am dead serious



oompa loompa said:
So I think my best bet is to get a cheap toshiba laptop (~$600) that has a single core processor (I guess single core is equivalent to Pentium M?) and I plan to keep it around 4-5 years. HOWEVER, everyone tells me single core processors are so 3 years ago and I'll regret not getting a duo core processor...I tell them I'm not a gamer and will just use the laptop for school purposes, but they still tell me I should get a core duo. I really cannot afford to waste money on technology I won't use...What do you all think?

I actually just returned a really nice Lenovo T60 laptop because I realized what a ripoff it was ($1500). I wasn't terribly impressed with the core duo processor either...probably b/c I never run CPU-intensive apps.

I need to get a laptop ASAP so some quick input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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SanDiegoSOD said:
I do some purchasing for the business I work for. I recently got a Dell with the following:

Inspiron e1405 (14.1 inch screen)

Intel Proc Duo (dual-core) T2500 Processor (2 GHz)
Windows XP Pro
1 GB Ram
Ultrasharp WXGA screen
100 Gig 7200RPM Harddrive
85 Whr battery
CD and DVD Burners
Enhanced DVD and CD Burning software
4 year on-site warranty
Adobe Elements 6.0
Intel Wireless card + bluetooth
$1,269 plus tax and shipping (total $1,354 after tax/shipping)

That's probably more than most of you will want to spend, but its a hell of a fast computer with a great warranty to make up for the shoddy Dell quality. Dell coupons are posted on many websites, including gotapex.com; the coupon I used was a $750 off a $1999 computer. A computer like this will easily serve one well all the way through med school.


Yup i got one just like that for really cheap last week, Dell was running a 35% off sale and so a really good Core Duo computer came down to less than $1000 with 4 yr warranty and antivirus software if you mailed in a $150 rebate....so def for anyone looking for laptops, check around, you may find a generally pricey laptop being offered so cheap that it's not worth buying the Core Solo at the same price
 

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This is said in all seriousness and not meant to be rude. Anybody who has to ask if they need a newer processor like the Core Duo doesn't utilize their computer enough to warrant spending that extra cash. Things might be a bit peppier if you multitask a ton, but on a laptop HD speed is the most common limiting factor. Few apps are multithreaded, and I somehow doubt you're running many, if any, of them.

The normal web-browsing, video watching, music listening, email crowd could easily get by on any generic ~1 GHz system with 512MB RAM.
 

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I use an IBM X24 with PIII 1.13 GHz
640 MB SDRAM (The old old one)
60 GB HD
WiFi

This is more than enough to do med school applications.

Don't spend $2000+ for a new computer because you think you will need that much power. You won't.

Buy a cheaper computer, and get a second monitor with the extra money to use a dual monitor at home.

If you must buy ONE computer I would suggest a computer with 14.1" with SXGA+ high resolution display. It will give you best combination of portability and screen real estate for slides. Avoid XGA for screens 14.1" or larger.
 

RSAgator

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there is a lot of misinformation in this thread...

Core Duo/Solo aren't simply slightly upgrade pentium M's, it's an entirely new chip architecture. The chips basically have an entirely new design. The biggest difference is the efficiency. The chips use less power thus running cooler than the pentium m's and previous chips. The result is more battery power, and fewer cooling issues.

The main advantage of a dual core processor is in multitasking. If you're say burning a DVD and you decide you want to look something up on the internet, it's going to be a lot faster on a dual core processor. The reason for this is that a single core would essentially queue the processes up whereas a dual core processor allows you to run concurrent processes more efficiently (better multitasking).

What I would suggest? Get what you can afford. Don't think "oh no, I'm not gonna be able to run vista if I don't get the highest speed dual core with the most ram" because if all you're doing is using Office (word, excel, powerpoint) you're not gonna need the beefiest computer you can find (a computer from 3 years ago would be able to run these things perfectly).
 

8744

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I have a six-year-old Toshiba Sattelite laptop with Windows 98 and it runs just fine.

It's not as if you're going to be doing memory intensive solid modeling in medical school. I'd say that Power-point is what you're goiong to use the most.
 

winstonm

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The macbook is amazing. The best combo of power, portability and elegance at anywhere near the price. Vista may have nice transparency effects, but as I found out over the last month of owning my first mac, OSX blows windows out of the the water and I doubt even vista will approach it.

Get the 2ghz, upgrade the HD to 80 GB and leave the RAM stock. Then go to NCIX.com and get 2gb ram for~$300 CAD -- tax and shipping in -- and you're set. Unless all you do is play games, in which case you may as well buy an XBox 360. Oh yeah, sell that Nano they give you for free and it's even cheaper.
 
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winstonm said:
Get the 2ghz, upgrade the HD to 80 GB and leave the RAM stock. Then go to NCIX.com and get 2gb ram for~$300 CAD -- tax and shipping in -- and you're set. Unless all you do is play games, in which case you may as well buy an XBox 360. Oh yeah, sell that Nano they give you for free and it's even cheaper.
My Macbook is on the way. I'm curious why you suggest paying $150 to upgrade from the base 1.83GHz processor to the 2.0GHz. As numerous individuals have already said, med school doesn't require an overly powerful computer, and the difference in processor speeds is going to be negligible in most users' experiences. Given this, why pay more?
 

tennisnr

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grogdamighty said:
My Macbook is on the way. I'm curious why you suggest paying $150 to upgrade from the base 1.83GHz processor to the 2.0GHz. As numerous individuals have already said, med school doesn't require an overly powerful computer, and the difference in processor speeds is going to be negligible in most users' experiences. Given this, why pay more?
Probably because that upgrade also upgrades your optical drive to a superdrive that also burns dvd's.
 

doctorFred

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i think you should hold out and get a cray xmp instead. the price has totally dropped from the initial 14.6 mil price tag. you could send ten thousand emails, view fifty thousand web pages, and listen to a million different black eyed peas mp3s at the same time.

honestly, you can get by in med school with any computer made in the past five years. i'm using a three year old powerbook, which is more than enough.. and if it wasn't, a new hard drive and some more memory for 200 bucks would do the job.
 
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