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least competitive...most competitive peds fellowships

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by lulu3, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. lulu3

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    what are the most competitive and least competitive peds fellowships? where does neonatology, critical care, and neurology fit in to those rankings? any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. oldbearprofessor

    Staff Member Administrator Rocket Scientist Physician Faculty Verified Expert 10+ Year Member

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    Neurology is not a fellowship. You can do neurology after a pedi residency, but it is not a fellowship, it is classified as a residency.

    Pick the field you want to do, demonstrate interest, do a bit of research if possible, etc and you can get almost any fellowship. Peds EM, cards and heme/onc are the most competitive. NICU and PICU are not competitive to get a slot somewhere, if you are more particular, then it's more competitive. There are less competitive areas but why worry about them if what you want to do is NICU or PICU?
     
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  3. Bernardo_11

    Bernardo_11 I like Popeye's Chicken.
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    While OBP is correct, there are some programs though that do call themselves "fellowships." They require at least 2 years of pediatric residency before starting and most programs entail a year of adult neuro, a year of child neuro, and another year of electives. At then end you end up with the designation of being certified in "Neurology with Special Qualification in Child Neurology" through the American Board of Psych and Neuro.

    Seattle Childrens hospital and Stanford are two examples.

    Most people I know go ahead and finish the 3rd year of pediatric residency before starting fellowship. So length of time-wise, it would be the normal 6 year length as one would expect from finishing a peds residency and doing a regular peds fellowship. Hope this helps.

    Nardo
     
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  4. OP
    OP
    lulu3

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    why are there so few PICU positions available job wise? Neonatology seems like there are more positions available. I just don't like the shift schedule that goes along with Neo...and it may be that way with PICU as well not sure. Is it possible to work as a neonatologist and not have shift schedules?
     
  5. oldbearprofessor

    Staff Member Administrator Rocket Scientist Physician Faculty Verified Expert 10+ Year Member

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    There are more small and/or sick babies than critically ill older kids. A lot more. NICU and PICU can be shifts or not, depending on where, etc. However, it is really hard to do either, especially NICU and not do night call most of your career. If you really don't want to work nights, pick a different career.
     
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  6. Stitch

    Stitch Jedi Ninja Wizard
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    There are actually a bunch open and not enough critical care physicians to fill them. It's not always well advertised, and it depends on what you're looking for. In the next few years, I suspect there will be even more PICU spots open given that 40% of fellowship programs aren't filling.

    In general there are more NICUs than PICUs, for reasons that OBP points out. I'd also add that it seems like everyone wants a NICU or level 2 nursery nowadays, at least partly because they are money makers and partly because the liability is becoming not worth it for general pediatricians to take care of these kids and attend deliveries.
     
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