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LECOM-FL Interviewees

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by krisco99, Feb 14, 2007.

  1. krisco99

    krisco99 Junior Member
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    Hey guys I'm a 1st year at LECOM Bradenton and just wanted to give some pointers and info to future lecomers. I'm an ambassador at the school so I always make sure to check the interview website to see comments, questions, and concerns.

    I did see that someone said it costs 40K to go here.....it's 25 (one of the cheaper schools). http://www.lecom.edu/bradenton/admissions/tuition.asp

    I also saw that someone said we don't have lectures.....well we have 2 huge lecture halls and we have quite our share of lectures.

    Our school is based on a PBL (Problem Based Learning) curriculum. Take your time and research every school you are applying to and check out what their curriculum is. You may decide that PBL is not for you. You are going to be spending alot of money on your education....go to a school that you know will fit your learning needs and where you will be happy.

    Someone said that the interviewers were not looking at their file etc. Well, our professors review EVERY file before they interview someone.

    I heard the interview day was long....when I interviewed LECOM was my shortest interview so it depends on the school.

    Endless resources are found in your books and you really get a chance to have one on one time with your professors...they are here for you.

    About cadaver dissection......if anyone has ever dissected a cavdaver they will understand what I'm talking about....when you look at an anatomy atlas everything is dissected beautifully or even in different colors by an anatomist...once you open that body up you are not going to have a clue what you are looking at as a first year medical student. Then you get frustrated and upset that you could be spending your time looking at your book more and looking at the professional dissected body at the front of the room. So in essence is a time saver. You are in medical school to be a doctor on living human bodies you are not going to school to be an anatomist. Therefore my point is you will learn everything and see everything you need to. Also, if you feel you really want to get that experience dissecting at the end of your 1st year you will have that opportunity.

    So remember....do your research and don't listen to rumors and choose what is right for you!

    Any questions please feel free to PM me.

    Another helpful website http://www.lecomsgabradenton.com/
     
  2. Dr.Inviz

    Dr.Inviz Membership Revoked
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    Personally, I do not wish to spend 30K+ per year doing independent study. I might as well buy the books, go to the local morgue, find some doctor friends, and study it all without the tuition and fees, and other costs. I wish to have professors lecture ... I mean, what else are we paying the school for ... to keep the lights on? :laugh:
     
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  3. DragonWell

    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    To each their own. Based on your statement, I don't think you understand much about the curriculum at LECOM-B and how PBL fits into it.
     
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  4. Dr.Inviz

    Dr.Inviz Membership Revoked
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    it was a sarcastic remark. I did read about their professor/student interactions and their supposed lecture sessions. however, to each their own is correct.
     
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  5. Krisss17

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    Hi Krisco99, thank you for sharing this information...from speaking with some students who are attending LECOM-Bradenton as well as from what I've read from the website, I'm definitely leaning towards them. While the location for me is perfect (I already live in B'ton), I'm really interested in PBL. Though I will probably apply to a few schools, one of the criteria that I will definitely be looking into schools that offer PBL.

    As for Dr. Inviz, it doesn't matter where you go...the majority of your studies will be independent...you are not in high school...you may go to some lectures, labs, etc., but you still have to be self-disciplined to do the enormous amounts of studying on your own.

    Krisss17
     
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  6. OP
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    krisco99

    krisco99 Junior Member
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    Dr. Inviz,
    Like I said before do your research on PBL and then decided if it's for you or not. Lecture based programs spoon feed you to memorize and when you go into your clinical years no one will be spoon feeding you then. Your attending will say, come back tomorrow and tell me all about congenital VSDs. As a PBL student you already know where to look for that info and how to study that info in a group or on your own. The program teaches you to problem solve from step one and how all the systems of the body are intergrated. If you do your research you will see that PBL has been around for awhile and many schools (MD and DO) have some sort of PBL. PBL students also perform better on boards.

    We do have lectures. As of now we are taking mini courses on ethics, geriatrics, and public health. We also were lectured to during anatomy, histology, and embryology.
     
  7. lateapplicant

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    First, thanks for the info. I was wondering if you could offer me any advice. I applied late in the application cycle to a couple of schools, including LECOM-Bradenton. I was told by another student that they didn't accept Canadian applicants, but after more digging I found out about a month a ago that they do. I have took the liberty to send in the secondary app already, right after I listed them as a designation on AACOMAS, and I believe I have the stats and EC to get in. Any advice on how I can avoid waiting another year to get in or who I could contact to try and get an interview before the spots are all filled?
     
  8. Premedlover

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    Hi Krisco99,

    I have been accepted to LECOM-B but I am now hearing that the school is not accredited by the AOA (provisional) only SACS...Is this true???? Also, I heard that the first graduation class that took the boards had a low pass rate and that it will possibly affect the accrediting process by the AOA.
     
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  9. Krisss17

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    Premedlover,

    If you go to the LECOM website and go to the Florida campus, you can see their accreditations...

    The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine is fully accredited by the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the [American Osteopathic Association,] Bureau of Education, Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA). AOA COCA is the only accrediting agency for predoctoral osteopathic medical education, and is recognized by the United States Department of Education.

    http://www.lecom.edu/bradenton/application/acc.asp

    Ital. and bolded for effect.

    Don't rely on hearsay...most of the time it is wrong or not related correctly.

    Krisss17
     
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  10. barracuda_vd

    barracuda_vd New Member

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    I went to the open house last weekend (OMAC) and I was very impressed with the campus. Before arriving, I was very skeptical about the PBL pathway, but after learning about the program, it seems to be a very logical way of teaching medicine. The Admin exclaimed that one particular student scored a 99% on the USMLE, and it seems to have worked in that students favor.

    VD
     
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  11. DragonWell

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    I was wondering if there were any SDNer's in the group. I was one of the students in the OMM lab cracking my buddy's neck. We felt like we were part of the show, LOL. As mentioned above, PBL takes self motivation, but for me at least, it has been a great way to learn. Glad you liked the campus.
     
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  12. barracuda_vd

    barracuda_vd New Member

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    Yeah, that worked out really well.

    VD
     
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  13. ajg3456

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    For the LECOM-BR student:

    I interviewed and was put on the alternate list. Any ideas as to how many people have been put on that list? Know of any classmates that were accepted after being put on the waitlist? Do you think it would be a good idea to send additional letters of rec or a personal letter stating my desire to be a part of PBL at LECOM-BR? Thanks!
     
  14. scpod

    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    I know several people that got in off of the waitlist. They ALL worked the list hard, sending in new LORs, grades, ECs and any other supporting material they had. They called on a regular basis just to let admissions know that they were interested. However, most of them were taken off the list in the last month before school started, so it may still be a long process. Good Luck!
     
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  15. Krisss17

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    Good, LECOM-B is saved!
     
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  16. fabu1ous

    fabu1ous Wow, it is so clear...
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    I am waitlisted there as well... Good luck to you-- I hope we both receive good news.

    As far as PBL goes, I think the most important thing to me is not how you are required to "teach yourself" medicine. (After all, we all know in lecture based classes, I would venture to say most students learn the most after lecture when subjects are learned independently. In both lecture and PBL, you are going to have to learn this stuff for yourself... no matter who your paying).

    The most important thing about PBL to me is how the information is presented. You start from a concept that is very broad and work your way down to the details, which seems to me would put everything into context, making details easier to understand and retain. This differs significantly from lectures, for instance a Pharmacology class I took at the college of medicine at my undergrad univ, where at the end of learning all of these drug mechanisms, it is difficult to apply it to everyday life because they weren't learned in context. I think this is the most interesting facet of PBL. It seems like a way of learning that can be used throughout your career in medicine to diagnose and treat patients.
     
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  17. scpod

    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    You hit on a really good example because learning about pharmacology in PBL is awesome. We tend to have "mini-blocks" of cases where several in a row will involve a particular system. We recently had a group of kidney cases, for instance, and learning about diaretics and blood pressure meds at the same time you are leaning kidney physiology is the ultimate. Plus, since you are working with a particular patient, who undoubtedly has other problems as well, you learn a lot about interactions-- why one drug may be better than another for a given case. For instance, if your kidney patient also has cholesterol problems, you may want to look at using something that doesn't tend to cause hypolipedemia. You really get a good look at the "whole picture" that way, and it's more memorable and interesting.
     
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  18. fabu1ous

    fabu1ous Wow, it is so clear...
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    You know, I'm really excited about how PBL is set up and I am really praying I get into LECOM's program. Are you a student there now (I know you're in PBL, but are you at LECOM-B?)

    In hopes of getting in this Fall, I have been taking courses on improving memory to help with studying :rolleyes: ... The cool thing about PBL, many courses discuss using memory tools to help you remember details to things. For instance, if you receive a case during PBL on "Sally", PBL not only describes her health history, but I think I would be able to make up stories about her life that will help me to remember whatever I'm learning about her. I know it sounds silly, but if I can see, hear, and imagine as much about Sally as I can, I can use little tricks to remember things about the particular system being studied, down to the detail. Which in turn I think will help me put the details to complex systems in place. What do you think?
     
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  19. fabu1ous

    fabu1ous Wow, it is so clear...
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    Oops, sorry Scpod, I just scrolled back up to the top which pretty much answered that you're currently a student there... not to mention the big ole' Class of 2010 Bradenton banner... you see why I need memory aids :D
     
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  20. fabu1ous

    fabu1ous Wow, it is so clear...
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    I thought it was interesting that Harvard Medical School uses PBL in their "New Pathway" approach to medicine... not sure if you knew that, but I think most could argue that one will receive a quality education at Harvard. True, I'm sure Harvard hands-down can offers fantastic research opportunities and amazing internships, but the foundation of the student's learning is very similar... Here's what their website says:


    Every year, 135 students are admitted to Harvard’s New Pathway M.D. Program and benefit from its many distinct features. These include:
    • small and highly interactive tutorial learning sessions that allow you to learn from classmates who are transformed into colleagues
    • a problem-based approach to learning where fundamental medical concepts are mastered not as much by memorizing entire textbooks as much as through group investigation and analysis of real patient cases
    • a strong emphasis on exploring the patient-doctor relationship and locating modern medical practices in its social context
    • a multidimensional schedule that forces you to take responsibility for your own education—you will conduct your own library research and decide, on your own, to collaborate in external research, joint degree programs, or more—at HMS or with one of our many affiliates
    Here's the website if you're interested:
    http://hms.harvard.edu/admissions/default.asp?page=pathway

    BTW, I also found a VERY INTERESTING article from Jan 07 on how Harvard is initiating a "Musculoskeletal Curriculum" based on a report by the AAMC in 2005 that determined, "...the inadequacy of musculoskeletal education at medical schools across the country" and the fact that "musculoskeletal pain is the top reason patients visit a doctor in the office, and this will likely continue as the Baby Boomers age."

    Go DO schools! Woo hoo! :)
    Very interesting, here's the website if you're interested:
    http://focus.hms.harvard.edu/2007/011207/medical_education.shtml
     
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  21. fabu1ous

    fabu1ous Wow, it is so clear...
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    I thought it was interesting that Harvard Medical School uses PBL in their "New Pathway" approach to medicine... not sure if you knew that, but I think most could argue that one will receive a quality education at Harvard. True, I'm sure Harvard hands-down can offers fantastic research opportunities and amazing internships, but the foundation of the student's learning is very similar... Here's what their website says:


    Every year, 135 students are admitted to Harvard’s New Pathway M.D. Program and benefit from its many distinct features. These include:
    • small and highly interactive tutorial learning sessions that allow you to learn from classmates who are transformed into colleagues
    • a problem-based approach to learning where fundamental medical concepts are mastered not as much by memorizing entire textbooks as much as through group investigation and analysis of real patient cases
    • a strong emphasis on exploring the patient-doctor relationship and locating modern medical practices in its social context
    • a multidimensional schedule that forces you to take responsibility for your own education—you will conduct your own library research and decide, on your own, to collaborate in external research, joint degree programs, or more—at HMS or with one of our many affiliates
    Here's the website if you're interested:
    http://hms.harvard.edu/admissions/default.asp?page=pathway

    BTW, I also found a VERY INTERESTING article from Jan 07 on how Harvard is initiating a "Musculoskeletal Curriculum" based on a report by the AAMC in 2005 that determined, "...the inadequacy of musculoskeletal education at medical schools across the country" and the fact that "musculoskeletal pain is the top reason patients visit a doctor in the office, and this will likely continue as the Baby Boomers age."

    Go DO schools! Woo hoo! :)
    Very interesting, here's the website if you're interested:
    http://focus.hms.harvard.edu/2007/011207/medical_education.shtml
     
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