Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Left Medical school and am now a software developer - AMA

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Awesome Sauceome, Nov 30, 2018.

  1. Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Hey all, been a LONG time since I have been on SDN (or even thought much about my “past life”). Jumping back on for an AMA.

    I attended KCU and left in my first year. Currently I am happily employed as a Software Developer - AMA!
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    goldfish_goldfish and Isoval like this.
  2. big_Z

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2016
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    10
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Why did you think med school was for you and when did you realize it wasn't?
     
    holdthemayo and Goro like this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Whew straight to the heart of it haha.

    For your first question. I definitely want to focus on the word "think" that you used.

    Basically I only thought about med school logically; I never really followed my heart on it. Like many young people on this path I had a few common attributes:
    1) I had a degree in science (which I deeply enjoyed getting), yet hated professional lab work. So that brings the question of "well what do I do with my life then?"

    2) I wanted to help people (or whatever that very broad statement means).

    3) A weird part of me was just searching to prove it that I could do something really freaking challenging. I wanted to prove it to myself, friends, my school, family members etc. Probably the best few months I've had was that golden time before school started and I could say "I got into med school."

    4) At the time it felt like the only route I had to make really good money (very much a typical college student mindset that more school = more money).

    5) I deeply enjoyed the camaraderie found on SDN and among people on this journey with me. Having a group of people that you belong to is a deep rooted part of who we are as humans - not to be taken lightly.

    6) I felt like I could plan out the next 20 years of my life: go to med school, do residency, do fellowship, start out in some small clinic, eventually start my own clinic, serve internationally every once in a while, etc. Again, an area not to be taken lightly. The sense of having a plan and purpose is powerful to human nature - even if it is not exactly what you are truly called to do.
    __________________

    What I did not follow/listen to:
    1) The many doctors who told me not to do it and/or that seemed miserable.

    2) My wife, who was INCREDIBLY supportive, but as a voice of reason was questioning my thoughts and plans when I was applying and saw that I was probably viewing the process with rose colored glasses.

    3) My heart - which at the crux was just continuing out of fear of the unknown ("what do I do with my life then???").
    _________________

    How I knew it was time to leave:
    1) When I (as someone with no history of mental illness) was waking up every morning before class, curled up in a ball, crippled with anxiety/panic attacks.Still not even sure what the heck that was - this stopped and has never recurred ever since signing the papers to leave.

    2) When it hit me that I honestly just didn't give a crap about any of the science/medicine like I had earlier in college. My passion for science was crushed in med school by minutiae. (However do not read that I don't like learning - current job/industry is an absolute OCEAN of growing knowledge and opportunity - and I love the struggle every day).

    3) When I saw my marriage suffering and/or could foresee areas in my future where it would be incredibly strained.

    4) When I found out my wife was pregnant (this was the final straw/some divine exit strategy).

    5) When it finally hit me about how much debt I was going to be in (roughly 500-550K pre-interest). This is another area that, no matter how much people talk about it, college students just can't understand until they are actively/heavily paying down their debt while trying to buy their first house, or their car breaks down, or you want to put your kid in a better school but can't afford it, etc.

    6) When it hit me that realistically I was going to be working my tail off and I didn't actually even know what my job would be. There is a massive difference between becoming a pediatrician and an orthopedic surgeon.

    7) I also had major regrets about the school choice I made. I absolutely hated Kansas City. I would've done much better at a smaller and/or lower key school or in a region I enjoyed more (like UNECOM or something).
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. indiRanger

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2017
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    18
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    How did you become a software developer?
     
  5. madiso30

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2015
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    47
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I find myself with similar reasons for pursuing medicine as yours. I have a little more reasons and a passion for the subject. So I wonder if you think that med school is worth it for some, most, or very few people?
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    So I suppose that is also quite a long story...

    Not gonna lie, when I left med school, life sucked quite a bit. I had what felt like a gaping chasm in my life. I had worked for years to get into medical school. I was also literally in thousands of dollars of credit card debt for MCAT courses, moving costs, supplies for school, etc (not to mention 200K of student debt between my wife and I). And then with a baby on the way... Living in my father-in-law's attic... I had to face that question of "what do I do with my life?" head on.

    The wife and I moved back to our home state to be with family. To pay the bills I applied to basically every job that I could - in science (as much as I didn't want to) and out of science in completely unrelated fields. In the meantime while I waited and was getting some phone interviews, I did general handyman work, painted houses, other stuff like that that I grew up knowing how to do. So that was a pretty tough/depressing time.

    Eventually, through someone I knew back home, I got an interview with a political marketing firm (so WAY out of my comfort range). They could tell that I was a hard working and unique guy, not to mention even having "got into med school" in your history, people assume you can do a pretty good job at whatever. I ended up having 4 interviews with this place because of their indecision on trying to figure out whether my past work and my past work ethic could translate. Thankfully I got the job. I was doing marketing and project management and just hated it (again, it was just a tough time).

    So on evenings and weekends I started to heavily invest time in other areas that might interest me. I still did some contractor work on the side (because money is good in that area where I live), I was shadowing police officers at night, talking to nurses, talking to pastors, engineers, basically any job out there. Just starting from square one, as if I was in middle school. Just trying to get an idea of what jobs even existed?

    Among my wandering, I stumbled upon some IT stuff from a family member who worked at Microsoft. We had some chats over some beers and it sounded good enough to me - at least better than what I had going for me. So I started studying for various IT exams to help break into the industry. It was kind of interesting (better than what I had going, but still not quite "it"). During that time, an old buddy of mine randomly hit me up to say he was starting a non-profit. We caught up and I told him what I was doing with my life (studying to break into IT). He heard that as "you can develop our website for us." So I winged my way through some terrible wordpress website haha.

    The non-profit died, along with my website, but I was just absolutely hooked. That was maybe like a littler over a year after I left med school. So from then on I dropped IT and started fervently learning various programming stuff. I wandered a bit for a few months. I started with simple web (HTML/CSS/Javascript) stuff - videos and practice stuff online, but wasn't making much headway. Eventually I jumped to Swift and started learning IOS/mobile development - which was an incredible experience. I continued to mess around with learning programming for like a year on my own.

    Around that time (I guess this was maybe like 2 years out from med school), somehow word got out that my company was looking for a Jr. Developer. The next day I walked into the president's office and point blank told him to give me the job. I told him I would do anything and learn anything to make it work. Because of my work ethic and good work that I continued to do in my marketing position, they miraculously gave me a shot at it. That was like a year ago. I spent the first two months mostly just soaking up languages and technologies and whatnot. Took me about 4-6 months to become reasonably competent. Now I am getting pretty dang solid; albeit will be a few years until I could call myself an expert.

    I continue to learn new cool stuff every day. I spend a lot of my time outside of work studying and learning new languages and technologies, and building stuff that I am interested in and/or that I think will boost the resume. Besides some typical office politics and crap, I feel like I have the coolest job in the world. The future looks very good.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #6 Awesome Sauceome, Nov 30, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2018
  7. GypsyHummus

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Messages:
    4,117
    Likes Received:
    2,486
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    How much did your undergrad degree help you with software development?

    Do you recommend software development to people?

    How hard is it to get into the industry from a science major? Non science major?

    How much can one expect to make in software development?

    How many hours/week do you work? Premeds really dont understand the concept of the non medical stuff a doctor has to do, fight with insurance, paperwork, long stressful hours, etc. They usually just see the cool surgery and say "Me want that". Nobody talks about the risk of communicable diseases.

    How are you planning on handling your debt?
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I told myself that I was deeply passionate about it. Heck, my own father died of cancer when I was a kid. When I was applying, I saw it as some kind of calling that had been subconsciously planted in my mind all the way from when I was a kid. And again, I truly did enjoy studying science. And some of the most formative experiences I have ever had was while working as a medical assistant prior to med school. I do enjoy serving and helping people (which I continue to do in other ways still today...)

    I suppose my advice comes with some caveats... If I was a single guy when I started school. I probably would've pushed through. If I hadn't taken 2.5 gap years in between college and med school. I probably would've pushed through. And I definitely felt smart enough and hard working enough to be there. If you get in, you can make it. Where the "worth it" questions come into play is how and what you want to spend your life doing. For some people, it makes perfect sense. And we need a lot of really good passionate doctors - especially as insurance companies and the government continue to tank our healthcare system.

    For me, I was pursing medicine to be the "ideal" version of myself, rather than just being myself. For example, a deep rooted part of me wanted to be a family man first and foremost. I am not saying you "can't" be that in medicine - it is just that much harder in that career, especially for the first 10 years or so. A deep rooted part of me also wanted to build and create things in my work - whether that is constructing a house or programming a cool phone application. I like being creative, designing things, thinking through logical problems involved with that. What I did NOT do, was let myself enjoy and explore those feelings when I was in college. I approached medical school too logically. I "thought" it was the best decision based upon the path I was put down. I thought that: "want to help people" + "want money" + "like to learn" + "science degree" = doctor.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #8 Awesome Sauceome, Nov 30, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2018
  9. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I would say that my undergrad degree helped in the sense that I learned how to work hard. It also gave me confidence coming out of high school - I was the first in my family to get a degree. I am sure I will continue to find interesting ways that my degree surface; but for the most part my biology degree doesn't help much.

    I do and don't for the same reason that I do and don't recommend medicine to people. It depends on who you are and your personality. I love it. You can get a job legit ANYWHERE, and you can make good money doing it. It absolutely is NOT a free ride, I would argue that intellectually it is way harder than anything I ever learned in school.

    Depends on your field. Embedded systems/AI/robotics, etc. you definitely need more formal education and pedigree. There is a lot of math and logic classes that you take that helps with those types of jobs. Otherwise, for web development, mobile dev, database/backend dev, data/analysis stuff, you can totally learn all that you need on your own. Just need to hammer away enough and get enough side hustle until you can break into it. As an example, I occasionally work with an agency that was founded by a developer with a high school diploma who just did freelance work until it grew to a big successful business.

    Money obviously depends on where you live... Big cities you make more, silicon valley you make a stupid amount; but obviously cost of living is high. I live in a decently populated area like 1.5 hours from DC. Most new guys would make like 50-60K starting out. A couple years in you can wrangle up to 70-80K, after like 5 years it is very easy to top over 100-150K depending on the languages and technologies that you know. There are definitely languages and regions where you can easily top 200K. If you have a security clearance you can basically add 50% to your salary.
    ***But I will caveat... development is VERY product oriented. It is like an old school trade skill. If you suck at programming you make less. If you are good at it, you can make more. If you don't push businesses forward, they WILL find someone cheaper than you to get the job done - there are lots of people who can get the job done. Hard work and good people skills help a lot (unless you are just a savant lol). It is such a different mindset than most college students are used to. Here is another way to look at it - look at contract workers. A freelance web developer starting out can make like $25 an hour. After you have a portfolio you can start making like $40-60. Add in some knowledge of backend tech and you are now pushing $80-100. If you have experience in larger applications, weird technology, full stack, security stuff, you can charge whatever. I think one of our experienced contractors we work with makes like $185-200/hr.

    I work a very standard 40 hour week. I never work weekends. I only spend free time programming stuff that I want to work on. I plan on working less and making more in the next 12 months or so - as I continue to get more skilled, and because I have some irons in the fire lol...

    One penny at a time... We live incredibly tightly... We manage every single dollar we get. We live in a crappy apartment. We first paid off all of our credit card debt. Now we are working on the car. Next up we will begin to focus on student debt - starting with the high interest/variable interest loans first. Once I start making a little more I will start diverting some cash towards a house maybe - still working through that stuff in my head.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    One thing I will add, now that I am thinking about it... is the low barrier of entry. As far as I am concerned, most people should not be developers.

    But I think most people owe it to themselves to at least try - just like we learn math, science, English, etc in school. You might know you are not meant to be an English teacher because you hate English and you hate kids - fair enough. I think a lot of people are scared of programming for some reason. But most people have never even tried it. It costs you legit nothing to check it out. If you have a laptop, you can try it. If you try it and hate it, then fair enough. But you might get hooked - and the only thing that was stopping you was your preconceived notion that you couldn’t do it. That was 100% the case for me. I distinctly remember talking to computer science majors in college and just being like “nah, I couldn’t do that.”

    And then once you are in there is such a range of jobs out there. Like there are plenty of easy jobs out there to dip your toes in. You are not expected to be some crazy expert your first year in (hence you are not paid a lot haha).

    This is more of a rant towards the standard college system which says you have to complete some major expensive hurdle before you are useful to society. In programming it is definitely a scale with a range of opportunities depending on your skill level.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #10 Awesome Sauceome, Nov 30, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2018
  11. Ixacex

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2015
    Messages:
    421
    Likes Received:
    206
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Medicine isnt for everybody. Glad you find what you truly enjoy.

    Im the opposite of you. Graduated with a Finance degree and hated every minute of it. Were late-bloomers but better late than never!
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    SingleMom5 and arc5005 like this.
  12. Goro

    Faculty Verified Expert 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    47,636
    Likes Received:
    67,865
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Saucy, would you say that even upon the even of matriculation, that Medicine wasn't a calling?
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Exactly... I do hope that none of my posts are coming off like I am crapping on medicine or something.

    I just felt called randomly (3 years out now) to give some of my experiences back. To help people that are on the fence - not to just blindly listen to me. But to just explore for themselves.

    There’s what like 350 million people in America now? Plenty of people feel like they are living their “dream” and they aren’t doctors. Others on the other hand are doctors and are living the dream.

    I suppose I just want to help encourage some younger folk to have the confidence to allow themself to really question who they are and what they want out of life.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    animalluver101 likes this.
  14. Osminog

    Osminog Future Doctopus

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2017
    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    2,098
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Do you ever regret leaving medical school?

    Do you think you would've been willing and/or able to get through med school if you weren't married?

    When you were a pre-med, what reasons did the miserable doctors give you for not pursuing a career in medicine?
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Ahh Goro, I distinctly remember all of your help back in 2013-2014. I hope all has been well.

    I would say so. I think there was always a deep part of me that knew it was incompatible with what I was going for in a career and what I wanted out of life. But I definitely ignored that feeling a lot. It was just that the feeling became insurmountable when I actually started school.

    So looking back - the only advice I would give younger me is to really pause, test the waters in a ton of different fields first. If you have even the slightest doubts, you lose nothing in talking to people in other fields, shadowing, spending time research and stuff. That way you can either save yourself, or validate your feelings towards, what will become, a very tough path.

    I basically only tried lab science, hated it, and then was like, "welp I guess I will be a doctor then." And because I pushed hard enough, I got in.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  16. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Not in the sense of wishing to be back or wanting to be a doctor. But really for that first year out - when I really had to face myself - I just was so lost on what I was doing. The medical school path gave me a very prescribed (heh... med joke) route that I was on, even if it was incompatible with what I wanted. It’s not nearly as comparable, but I imagine it is slightly similar for folks who leave the military. Just that fear of the unknown can be daunting.

    Wasn’t necessarily marriage, in fact I vaguely recall a study back a few years ago that said students with families perform better. I never heard a single negative word from my wife. She was incredibly supportive of me needing to focus on school more than her. It was ME who had issues with it. I didn’t want to focus on school more. I didn’t want to focus on my career more afterwards. I very much have the “yolo” mentality, and family to me has naturally stayed top of the list - even to the point of giving up being a doctor so I could have more time with them.

    Most doctors said to become a PA or go into other businesses. It was a mixture of insurance headaches, too much work, too much debt, not actually becoming the reality of “helping people” that they envisioned. Jaded from healthcare politics. All sorts of reasons. Honestly most fields have a litany of reasons to not go into them - there is no perfect job. The difference is that in most other fields you don’t spend 10 years and a couple hundred grand only to realize you want out. In most fields you don’t hear much about it because people more gracefully enter and leave the profession because the implications are not as high.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    Shotapp, GypsyHummus and Osminog like this.
  17. Herbidot

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    There are a lot of Doctors that suggest considering the PA route...as a family man is that something you wish you would have considered earlier? What would you recommend to somebody stuck in between both paths of MD vs. PA?
     
  18. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    See now that one is a pickle...

    Past me briefly did face that decision and decided on med school specifically because of the opportunities it would give down the road: easier times switching careers, owning a business, maybe dabbling in teaching or research.

    As much as the docs said go the PA route, I personally can’t help but feel like that route is going to dry up eventually here. It feels too much like a gold rush to me. And eventually supply and demand will dictate the income of PAs as mid level providers (just like nursing) and it will level out. Just my two cents. I bet it will still be a good profession, but it just doesn’t strike me as “the answer” because the schools are pumping out so many graduates.

    I guess going back, if I was dead set on healthcare, I don’t know... I suppose it would be a toss up between podiatry, dentistry, and PA. Just the uncertainty of what your actual job/income would be as a MD/DO, combined with the fact that mid levels ARE encroaching, AND the fact that MD/DO physically requires residency of at least 3 years (but up to what 7 depending on your specialty?) just makes it that much of a harder decision to muscle through.

    With the other routes you have a greater sense of your actual job on the other side - and thus your financial burden, time commitment, and income. If we are just approaching it as a job and not some weird divine calling that many med schools play it out to be (KCU kind of did that), then that is where my gut falls.

    But again, overall, my personal feelings are that you should only commit to really any job in healthcare if you are truly passionate about healthcare. There is no shame in not wanting to deal with that stuff and the struggles involved in getting that kind of position.

    In my case I was not. I wanted to be a family man, make good money, use my brain, and be able to work wherever I wanted. Yes medicine fits that bill, but it has the caveats that I ran into.

    That’s a great, but tougher question that definitely comes with its own level of bias from me. So for sure take it with a grain of salt.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    Herbidot likes this.
  19. golfman7

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    338
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Wow... I followed your posts when I was looking into medicine. I got waitlisted and have done engineering and am almost done now. Don’t regret it and medicine is certainly not for everyone. I got excited about interviews etc but don’t think I would have done well in med school and probably would have left in first year also. Definitely think medicine is a difficult and tiring path and should not be taken lightly. I have enjoyed construction management a lot and think it will be good for me long term. Admissions made me realize how competitive this field is and how it takes over your life as well.
     
    Goro likes this.
  20. DO2015CA

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2014
    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    2,226
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Just curious, if you never matriculated to med school why are you still around this forum? Are you still looking to eventually get in? You are in a totally unrelated field now.
     
    arc5005 likes this.
  21. golfman7

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    338
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I still like looking at threads and forums from time to time... was on this website for several years and was big part of life lol. Not to mention it’s cool seeing what some posters are up to now that I followed for awhile.
     
  22. OP
    OP
    Awesome Sauceome

    Awesome Sauceome SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Verified Account 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,115
    Likes Received:
    2,669
    Status:
    Non-Student
    It’s kind of funny, I am on a bit more now as well. I don’t really look at pre-med but the interesting conversations in the med student and physician forums. There is still a lot to be gleaned about the direction of healthcare in our country from reading this stuff.

    For instance, I went down the rabbit hole the other night reading about the insane circumstances pathology residents are going down. Who in the freaking world would commit so much time down that route (having to even get multiple fellowships!) to have just a shot at those jobs? Seeing the unemployment issues after all of that hard work. Just seems a little weird/crazy to me.

    Heck, just the other day I was offered a management position at my company and it paid 6 figures. I am not even 30 yet. I turned it down because I am confident I will be there soon (with programming). But yeah, just the idea that the only way to get good money is through going through these insane hoops, is just sad/insane to me. And in the case of pathology, it’s all for a desk job, not even some crazy glorified job like ortho or something.

    But I digress... so yeah, I agree, something unique about the SDN forum, though most of my free time is now on Stackoverflow - where I can help on programming related stuff. The problem is it is just not the same quality of community. This is a pretty special space, here on SDN. I’ve gotta hand it to them... for the most part it is a really great community of cool hard working individuals.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    golfman7 and tsmleague like this.
  23. golfman7

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    338
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Yeah the match has gotten extremely competitive too with healthcare reform and trying to get into ortho etc is tough now. And this community is definitely knowledgeable and helpful for those looking into medical careers. I look at engineer forums now mostly. I think being up to date on current healthcare is important whether your in the field or not and will use this site as a resource for that. And some specialties definitely have employment issues currently and going through residency etc with all that debt and no job would be awful.
     
    #23 golfman7, Dec 31, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2018
  24. golfman7

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    338
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    And congrats on finding a career outside of medicine you like! Sounds like your doing well with programming...
     
  25. golfman7

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2013
    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    338
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Do you regret leaving med school? I had doubts when I interviewed and wasn't sure if that was the right path for me and was interested due to it being a good use of my science skills.
     
  26. thoracentesis

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    27

Share This Page