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legal repercussions of not starting a contract?

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finalpsychyear

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Hey. Had a friend of mine who decided a few weeks before her start date that she was no longer interested in starting her job. Contract specifically states 90 day notice and but she only decided this 2 weeks ago and did do a courtesy call to which the physician working with her said "well we have taking legal actions in the past against doctors who have done this" but was unable to specify further. They received another letter today pushing her start date back a week if she comes or stated legal repercussions would follow per breach of contract.

This person has not received any bonuses or money of any kind and paid all their own licensing fees.
I realize anyone can sue anyone for anything but so far no legal document has come.
What typically happens in these cases if you actually never start the job and don't receive any type of money beforehand?
 

Shikima

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Contract is a contract. Give 90 day notice on first day and move on.
 
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DokterMom

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What typically happens in cases like this? Nothing except maybe some badmouthing for your friend's lack of professionalism.

What could happen? Breach of contract lawsuit.

What will happen? How nasty is the job and desperate are they for people? Even unhappy ones who will leave in 89 days?
 

hamstergang

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What typically happens in these cases if you actually never start the job and don't receive any type of money beforehand?
They can sue for any damages, which includes more than just money given to you in advance. Money spent on searching for a replacement, for instance. Lost revenue for those 90 days not worked, perhaps?
 
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michaelrack

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Agree with hamstergang, in your case it would likely be costs of searching for replacement, and someone to do the job for 90 days (the cost of hiring a locums doctor) minus what your salary would have been.
 
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dl2dp2

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They can litigate and it will likely go to arbitration. They might not, though if they do she would have to find her own representation. It's annoying as hell and can easily cost you 3 months salary.

I don't get "your friend" at all. Why did she "decide" *after* signing the contract...is this one of those I'm an FMG and I don't know how US laws work situations?
 

finalpsychyear

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They can litigate and it will likely go to arbitration. They might not, though if they do she would have to find her own representation. It's annoying as hell and can easily cost you 3 months salary.

I don't get "your friend" at all. Why did she "decide" *after* signing the contract...is this one of those I'm an FMG and I don't know how US laws work situations?


She is a sports medicine doc and jobs are i guess more difficult to come by. She took a job in NYC during fellowship because few were available but then after fellowship when she moved back home to another state a job popped up at the last second in her area.

This make me appreciate how lucky psych is to have jobs literally everywhere you look.
 
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Shikima

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Start sooner than later and give 90 days notice. Tell the other company she'll be working there within 6 months time.
 
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