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Lit Review Publication

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Clfriendly, Aug 18, 2015.

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Is a lit review publication significant if the undergrad is first author

  1. Yes

    9 vote(s)
    75.0%
  2. No

    3 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. Clfriendly

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    Recently, as in four months ago, I began independent research at my university. After months of compiling and analyzing literature, my literature review is finally nearing the publication stage. I know that I have put in well over 500 hours on my literature review.

    Today, I went to visit my pre-med advisor. We began talking about my upcomming publication process and she told me that my research, which I will be first author on, holds little significance unless I am applying for an MD/PhD program. She told me that it would merely be a filler on my application.

    Now this threw me into a state of shock because it was like being told I wasted four months working on something I am very passionate are about.

    My question is as follows:
    Does a first author publication for a lit review that is self-lead hold significant weight when applying for MD or DO schools?
     
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  3. HybridEarth

    2+ Year Member

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    Coupled with a strong application, a publication of any sort will stand out. Although I hate to generalize, many pre-med advisors are unfortunately uninformed.
     
  4. cantankerous

    2+ Year Member

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    Well if you were really passionate about it, why do you feel like you "wasted four months?"
    Whether or not it holds value to your application, you should still feel like it was worth it.
     
  5. Clfriendly

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    I personally do not think I wasted four months, I have learned much about myself and the research process in the past four months. I feel like I have made a huge leap in terms of academic difficulty. I am simply concerned that others may view my hard work as a waste like that pre-med advisor implied. (If that makes any sense)
     
  6. Carmiche

    2+ Year Member

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    This is false. A publication WILL help on an application to MD programs, as long as you can talk intelligibly about it and what you gained from it. As you are first author and actually wrote the whole thing, I would assume you can.

    I would make an educated guess that the majority of students applying don't have in depth research experience, and a much lower number have publications. If you look at any of the med schools that are research powerhouses (many of the top 20s), research experience is something that almost all of those accepted have. Very few students get accepted to these schools with no experience researching. Assuming your paper gets published, having a first author pub will be a a great addition to your application. If it doesn't get published, you still have the experience.
     
  7. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    A paper that has been accepted for publication is always a good thing. That said, hypothesis driven research will be more highly valued than a literature review. An unpublished lit review has almost no value in contrast to unpublished bench research.
     
    Goro and Pacna like this.
  8. Lawper

    Lawper In 3D
    Rocket Scientist Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    Your adviser just spouted garbage as usual. Tip: SDN >>> premed advisers, unless the advisers served directly on medical school admission committee.

    Research always helps for any medical school, MD or DO. Published research, even if it is a literature review, is highly valued, but by no means necessary. Just be sure to focus on a school's mission and plan accordingly (i.e. don't focus too much on research for schools that value service)
     
    Goro likes this.
  9. Goro

    Faculty 7+ Year Member

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    Data point # 407 that most pre-med advisors have the brains of a flea.

     
  10. Clfriendly

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    Now, the literature review presents facts that show an obvious lack of reaserch in my area of focus. My mentor and I are planning to write a research proposal and apply for a grant at my school. This will lead to hypothesis driven research. My pre-med advisor also told me I need, at minimum, 60 hours of shadowing. Thoughts on that?
     
  11. themoonman2

    2+ Year Member

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    Congrats on your publication! You should be very proud of that.

    As far as shadowing goes, I don't know if there's a consensus on minimum number of hours, but I would say 60-100 should be sufficient, especially if you can mix it up with a few specialties. I did a bunch of hours because I really enjoyed seeing patients and the medical process of problem solving, but I certainly reached a point at around 200 hours where the only way I could really gain more from the experience was if I had serious medical knowledge. In any case, definitely get out there and shadow- it's the best way to learn what a doctor actually does.
     
    Clfriendly likes this.
  12. GrapesofRath

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    Gyngyn says about 20-25% of his class each year didn't have shadowing and made up for it in other ways to get clinical exposure.

    In a survey done by Ohio State of ADCOMs only 17% said a lack of shadowing could possibly be grounds for rejecting someone. Likewise, 58% said a lack of volunteering could be.

    So no, there are no absolutes. Yes, you should get shadowing as a) it's good experience b) its not nearly as hard to find as people think c) it's just something most pre-meds do and doesn't take significant time.
     

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