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Loan Question

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ]' started by SynapticDoctah, 05.21.14.

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  1. SynapticDoctah

    SynapticDoctah 2+ Year Member

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    So I am compiling my list of schools to apply to this year. One question though. Am I being crazy for really focusing on cost as a significant factor? I heard there is loan forgiveness, which if true, would pretty much take away this factor because I wouldn't have to pay the entire loan anyways.
     
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  3. Ismet

    Ismet PGY-fun SDN Administrator 5+ Year Member

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    Cost is a significant factor. Don't bank on PSLF or other loan forgiveness being there once you get to residency, those programs may not be around forever. There are also stipulations, such as having to pay on time for 10 years and work for a 501c3 or other requirements https://www.aamc.org/advocacy/meded/79048/student_loan_repayment.html
     
    pathologyDO and lmn like this.
  4. ace12345

    ace12345 2+ Year Member

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    Do not, in any manner, count on loan forgiveness being a factor in your financial planning (Unless you are dead set on primary care and willing to sign up for a commitment program today). It is impossible to tell what the financial climate in medicine will be like in 10 years. You are absolutely right for considering cost, and so should every other applicant.

    Now that said, a lot of the most expensive schools will not be after financial aid is determined post-acceptance. Some of my seemingly most expensive schools became the cheapest after financial aid. Therefore, it might be good idea to look into the resources each school has, and how many students receive scholarships/aid. This can be found, generally, on the MSAR.
     
  5. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers SDN Advisor 10+ Year Member

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    When looking at cost, do consider whether a school is friendly to OOS applicants. An inexpensive school that won't consider you because you are OOS is a wasted application.

    I do concur that some seemingly expensive schools will not be so bad once the school throws merit or need based grants your way.

    Do not get sucked into the idea that MD/PhD is the way to go unless you are a strong candidate for admission to a PhD program and can see yourself doing PhD work 80% time.

    Do not get sucked into the idea that a military scholarship or enrollment in USUHS is a great idea unless you are sold on the idea of being a military officer.
     
    pathologyDO, mdambitions, lmn and 2 others like this.
  6. chenzt

    chenzt 2+ Year Member

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    The quick and dirty way to guesstimate how cheap a school is is to go to MSAR and look at each school's average debt upon graduation number. Harvard/state schools are around 100k, top 20s are under 150k, mid tier under 200k, and low tier over 200k. Not true for every school but most follow this general trend.

    There are some exceptions, such as Case Western College track's 32 full tuition scholarship skewing their number to <150k, which wouldn't be available to you if you were only accepted to their University track. Some school also have richer than average student body that contributes more and thus have less loan.
     
    Last edited: 05.21.14
  7. SynapticDoctah

    SynapticDoctah 2+ Year Member

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    If the school was 50k a year but in my state (possibly leading to
    Residencies here) would that 200k+ debt be too hard to pay off?
     
  8. Ismet

    Ismet PGY-fun SDN Administrator 5+ Year Member

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    Depends on what specialty you go into. A general pediatrician will have a much longer repayment period than an orthopedic surgeon.
     
  9. SynapticDoctah

    SynapticDoctah 2+ Year Member

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    Okay, so if I were in a surgical specialty and my wife is an RN, I shouldn't have problems paying back loans on a 50k a year school?
     
  10. lmn

    lmn 2+ Year Member

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    Loan repayment is a lot more complex than how you are thinking about it. But in general, you will be able to pay off your loans as a physician if you take care to not live above your means and don't end up in an odd situation of having >$300k debt upon graduation and going into primary care in an extremely low paying area that doesn't have any forgiveness type programs.
     
  11. SynapticDoctah

    SynapticDoctah 2+ Year Member

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    What's a good cutoff number though? Like what amount of tuition is too much?
     
  12. kyamh

    kyamh 2+ Year Member

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    Go to this site:

    http://www.finaid.org/calculators/loanpayments.phtml

    Enter in approximate loan amount ($200k, whatever) add $50k for unforeseeable extras and for interest during medical school, then select a term - 25 years is common. This program will give you your monthly payment to pay off the loan.

    Can a current student give an example medical school loan interest rate? My undergrad loans are at 4.75% and 5.75%...not sure if that helps.

    Edit: If you read further down on the site output, it gives you the annual income you should have to pay the loan off comfortably (10% of income goes to the loan). Keep in mind that 30% of your salary will go to taxes first ;)
     
  13. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    $179,831.27 Anything above this, and you'll never pay it off.

    Seriously though, you're thinking about it wrong or way too much.

    You're probably going to go into a lot of debt. If you want to be a doctor, it's coming.
    Try to minimize the amount you have to take on. But, I wouldn't fall in love with any hard figure.
     
  14. IlDestriero

    IlDestriero Ether Man 7+ Year Member

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  15. SynapticDoctah

    SynapticDoctah 2+ Year Member

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    It's hard for me because though I'm posting in the MD threads, I am most likely gonna end up at a DO school and most of them
    Are 44k at least..
     
  16. Gauss44

    Gauss44 2+ Year Member

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    I cannot comment on your question about being crazy, although I've heard that asking about it is a sign of a self esteem issue.

    Regarding the loans, I would try to find the terms and conditions of "loan forgiveness." "Loan forgiveness" can mean a lot of different things. From what I hear sometimes it means forgiving a great deal or all of the balance, other times it's as useless as 10% a year for agreeing to forgo almost half your salary.
     
  17. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    While I appreciate that, you're just overthinking it.

    Either you want to be a doctor, and you can pay back loans over 25 years like countless before you have done.
    Or you don't.

    The debt is just part of it.

    How many people have gone to DO school and paid 45K a year? 10's of thousdands? Hundreds of thousands?
    You'll be able to pay back the loans and live comfortably.
     

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