atlantaterp

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Feb 9, 2005
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I just found this site and love it.

I am 30 and will be going back to school this summer to finish up my prereqs. I am hoping to be accepted in the fall of '06. I am married with one child. My engineering degree has allowed me to be a success financially, but I have come to the realization that this is not what I was meant to do.

I enjoyed the "25 and up" post as I can relate, but I am looking for some more insight from those who are in my position and are in school now. How do you balance the school/study/family/work?

As if you couldn't tell I am a huge planner. My wife works a flex schedule at the local hospital already so I have lots of flexibility workwise. I probably won't be working a lot anyway.

Just looking for some ideas that would make life easier. Consider this a "If I knew then..." thread.

Thanks
 

skp

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atlantaterp said:
I just found this site and love it.

I am 30 and will be going back to school this summer to finish up my prereqs. I am hoping to be accepted in the fall of '06. I am married with one child. My engineering degree has allowed me to be a success financially, but I have come to the realization that this is not what I was meant to do.

I enjoyed the "25 and up" post as I can relate, but I am looking for some more insight from those who are in my position and are in school now. How do you balance the school/study/family/work?

As if you couldn't tell I am a huge planner. My wife works a flex schedule at the local hospital already so I have lots of flexibility workwise. I probably won't be working a lot anyway.

Just looking for some ideas that would make life easier. Consider this a "If I knew then..." thread.

Thanks
Treat school like work. Put in your hours in the daytime or when your child and wife aren't around if you can, so you can spend time with them when they want to spend it with you. you'll figure it out...sometimes it just takes a little time. i don't have it down by any means. make sure and not give absolute priority to one thing. balance balance balance. again, much harder than it sounds - for me too!

oh with work...do the minimum - spend any extra time studying or with your fam. if it doesn't stress you financially... my opinion anyways
take care
-skp
 

blueclassring

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Jan 7, 2005
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Pharmacist
So far my journey has been filled with a lot of stress. Balancing it out has been a struggle, but it really depends on the kind of support system you have at home. Luckily my gf is very understanding that I'm doing this for our future, and she gladly accomodates the things that I have to do.

Currently I'm working a chemical engineering position, studying for the pcat, take two pre-reqs, tutoring adults and children, doing hospice work, and volunteering at the local pharmacy. It will be even more hectic in the next coming semesters. My time is stretched out very thin and I have little time for myself but in the end it will be worth it.

I too came to the conclusion about my engineering degree. For me, it was the lack of job satisfaction and professional achievement that I got from my job. And the hours were downright terrible, but yes you can be financially secure doing it. The only downside is I've seen massive layoffs in engineering and I don't want to be a victim. Plus, I've always wanted to be a pharmacist.
 

skp

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pharmacology said:
I tell students who are married that they will likely have a bit more difficult time than single students.....I tell this to the entire class, not to select married people. In saying that I also say that it is certainly not impossible. Many married people are in pharmacy school and most...perhaps more (than singles) make it.

Why is it more difficult. Well you have one priority above pharmacy school..the wife. You may have others in children. This is something single/no kids people do not have to deal with. I think most single/not engaged people generally put their schooling at #1.....they still have fun but school is their priority. They have a test, they can shut the door and study. While married people can do that sometimes there is a feeling of guilt. We have 4-5 classes with 3-4 exams per class per semester. That is a lot of shutting the door on your family....perhaps a lot of guilt.

But what someone said above is a really good answer. Make the effort to do your studying when your wife is at work (assuming you don't also havea child to care for). Really sit down with your spouse and discuss your and their willingness to go for the PharmD. It is not as intense as med school but it certainly isn't anything like undergrad either. While it may be harder or a bit more difficult for a married couple it can also sometimes work out better. Unlike your general single person who does what he/she wants when they want (barring work), the married couple likely have already developed a schedule and may be better at scheduling and organizing......that can be a real benefit for studying. I think it is all about balance and compromise. Everyone has to know that pharmacy school is way up there on your priority list...but they should also know that they wife/kids are the top priority.

Oh, finally.....if you are smart and you keep up with the material...the exam should not be that tough. Just don't wait until the exam to study. And unless you want to go into some select specialty I would not worry about grades too much. Sure you want the "A"...you got a "B" big deal. Hey you are an engineer....how often does your boss walk upto you and ask you what grade you got in calculus.....down the line you want a relatively decent overall grade and a pass on the naplex. Just make sure you keep your family as happy as you are about being in Pharmacy school.....both count.
wow...my advice was ok...this advice is very very good :thumbup:
i think i learned something too
thanks, pharmacology