Quantcast

low step 2, didnt match, planning step 3

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

art76

New Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
4
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
I am an IMG from india with a step 1 and 2 scores of 90 and 77 respectively. The Step 2 was a disaster because i absolutely didnt study for it. I can't do anything to change my scores in step 2 but I am planning to take my Step 3 in 3 months from now. Although I know that programs just look at a pass or fail status on a Step 3, is it possible that getting a good score on the Step 3 would somehow make up for the Step 2 fiasco? I applied to pathology this year round but didnt match anywhere. Will be applying again for pathology next year. Any suggestions on what further I can do to strengthen my application?
 

beyond all hope

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2003
Messages
623
Reaction score
7
If you can't get a prelim medicine spot, do a research year.

BTW, I'm not sure you can take Step III without being in residency. You'd better check that.
 

docmojo

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
58
Reaction score
0
I believe you can take it in Connecticut without a residency. I know people who have taken it there. There is at least one other state but I'm not sure which it is.
 
N

njbmd

Originally posted by art76
I am an IMG from india with a step 1 and 2 scores of 90 and 77 respectively. The Step 2 was a disaster because i absolutely didnt study for it. I can't do anything to change my scores in step 2 but I am planning to take my Step 3 in 3 months from now. Although I know that programs just look at a pass or fail status on a Step 3, is it possible that getting a good score on the Step 3 would somehow make up for the Step 2 fiasco? I applied to pathology this year round but didnt match anywhere. Will be applying again for pathology next year. Any suggestions on what further I can do to strengthen my application?

Hi there,
Step 3 will not "make up" for a poor score on Step 2. You need to choose your residency programs carefully in order to match next year. Every program director knows that most folks take Step 3 while in intership with little or no study. Even if you ace Step 3, they will see that you are not working and will chalk it up to you having tons of time to study.

You passed Step 2 and while your score was not stellar, it was a pass. Get a pass on Step 3 and spend the rest of your time looking for residencies that will be a good fit for you. Path has gotten more competitive (good lifestyle), especially the "name" programs so make sure you apply to enough programs that are a little less competitive. Other than being wise in choosing a wide range and level of programs, you don't have to obsess about your Step 2 or Step 3 USMLE scores.

Good luck!
njbmd:cool:
 

DrKnowItAll

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2003
Messages
55
Reaction score
1
You have now come to a point where you should ask yourself if being a pathologist is really so important that you are willing to spend another year or two trying to secure a residency spot. There are many creative things you can do with your MD degree: publishing, insurance, pharmaceuticals, research...

The time you need to spend trying to get a residency position and going through the training could be much better spent elsewhere unless you are absolutely and inseparably tied to the idea of being a pathologist.
 

kinetic

Membership Revoked
Removed
15+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2004
Messages
14,514
Reaction score
4
People often talk about the flexibility that an MD degree offers, but that is really more myth than fact. Pharmaceutical companies will hire you in a heartbeat, but generally only once you have been Board-certified in a specialty. Working in law requires that you get a law degree and administrative work requires an MPH. Research (as a primary or paid investigator) is preferentially directed towards pure PhDs or dual degree physicians.
 
Top