Quantcast

med school difficulty vs. pharmacy difficulty

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.
Status
Not open for further replies.

reese07

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2007
Messages
516
Reaction score
18

Members don't see this ad.
how much different is the difficulty in workload between med school and pharmacy school?? how about the lifestyle?? How about the stress between residencies for pharmacy and medical school? I heard med students basically have no time to have social life unless they really manage their time...is this the same for pharmacy school? I want to become a doctor but is starting to get overwhelmed with the gloomy posts med students post about med school stress in the medicine section of this site...I want to know if there is not that much a big difference between pharmacy and med school...
 

AMO69657

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2006
Messages
144
Reaction score
0
They're both really demanding and time consuming. I don't know specfically how difficult each type of school is but I will tell you this...both of my good friends are very intelligent and have good time management, but one is in medical school and I never seen her since she started last semester and only hear from her rarely bc she's so busy studying. My pharm friends still have a social life, and I frequently hear from them, they say 1st yr isn't so bad but later on it gets tough. I don't know if that tells you anything :)
 

rxforlife2004

Membership Revoked
Removed
5+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2004
Messages
872
Reaction score
6
it depends on how u define "difficult". They're both challenging...but if u like what u're doing then the challenge becomes love...??? ahhahaa....Well, i did enjoy pharm school, though...:love:, but i do expect med school to be a lot more challenging...
 

imount

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2007
Messages
65
Reaction score
0
I am having the exact same problem which has been worrying me like crazy. I would think that pharmacy school would be easier opportunity to hang out w/ friends than in med school. I don't know what to do. I think that I would enjoy the journey of the pharmacy education as in more social life but I like the material learned in medicine, job-wise I like both. I keep getting this laid back feeling when I think about going into pharmacy, I feel that I would not have to worry as much about grades since I just need the degree but in medicine I need good grades/scores to get a residency/specialty that I like. But if I don't go into medicine I'm pretty sure I'll wonder what if?:confused:
 

Tessalon

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2007
Messages
71
Reaction score
1
Pharmacy school was challenging, but in a good way. I always knew that what I learned would be useful for my job, unlike the stuff we had to learn in undergrad. I studied about 2-4 hours a day after class (maybe more if a test was approaching), I always had time for my friends and social events (never missed a home football or basketball game or party), and I really enjoyed what I was learning.
As far as medical school goes, from my observational standpoint, it is WAY more intense. I would see the same people in the same spot in the library at any time of day. Yes you can make more money, and it is very prestigious, however I CHERISH my free time outside of work. If I have a choice of a 40 hour workweek and earning $80-100k versus working 80 hours a week, spending my 20s and early 30s in school, residencies, and fellowships, but maybe pulling in way more money, I would still pick pharmacy.
That said, if you enjoy the thought of examining patients (every skin fold and crevice), performing surgery, reading, writing, etc., and you have a crazy belief that pharmacists are inferior, then med school might be for you. IF you enjoy pharmacology, math, a bit of chemistry, biology, physiology, and are good at communication, and you are OKAY with the fact that the doctor usually has the final say, then consider pharmacy.:hardy: You can still do a residency and work alongside physicians if you feel hospital pharmacy is a better fit for you. In our hospital, I have heard stories of physicians who will refuse to start rounds without their pharmacists. One even sat in a chair and yelled that "no one is going anywhere until my pharmacist is here!" So yes, we are appreciated. Good luck with your choices!
 

biogirl215

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
May 1, 2007
Messages
458
Reaction score
0
rxforlife,
You're going straight from pharmacy school to med school?:confused:
 
D

da8s0859q

As a pre-MD-but-potentially-pre-PharmD, I'm also interested.
 

cy19861126

Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2005
Messages
211
Reaction score
0
I just started pharmacy school this summer. How come I don't get any free time??? I can't imagine how med school is going to be any difficult cuz if so, there won't be even much time for sleep for a med student. Maybe I just suck at chemistry and biology and stuff and that's why I'm having such a hard time
 

HarcourtMonopol

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Messages
42
Reaction score
0
Yeah, I would also like to know how pharmacy residency compares to med residency. I've heard/read terrible things about med residency - falling asleep at the wheel post-call, abortions because it'd be way too difficult to have a baby during residency, the hours - although I think there is an 80 hour/week limit now. Is pharmacy residency similar? Can anyone chime in?
 

reese07

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2007
Messages
516
Reaction score
18
also, if one can finish and go through pharmacy school, does that person have the ability to finish med school also if he/she went to medicine instead of pharm? I am wondering if since ur smart enough to endure pharmacy school, can u also endure med school..
 

Eugene

New Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2006
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
I would imagine that, if you are healthy, walking 2 miles and 2.5 miles make little difference. If you are weighed down, or injured, then the half mile extra really burns. I think that, if you are young, have fewer responsibilities, and no significant personal constraints, then both Med and Pharm school are equal. Med school takes longer and that kills people when their personal circumstances change.

Med students do party, and maybe even more than pharmacy students at my school. They have a beginning-of-the-year party, end-of-the-semester party, passing-a-big-test celebration, three voluntary-but-if-you-don't-go-you're-a-dork social events, but this is during the first year.

I think the main difference, at least for my school, is that the Med students are averagely younger than the pharm students. I think many people, when they get older, are more socially inward even when they have free time. All that aside, Med school has more class time (I think one block in the morning, one in the afternoon), hence people say it is "harder."

I know of a student who got a PharmD and is doing a DO, and feel that it is the same amount of work. Though I don't think Pharmacy school makes you "smarter", the workload must have desensitized you to a level that you don't feel med school is way far off (unless again, your family or personal situation changes).
 

TheChemist

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2005
Messages
197
Reaction score
0
I am currently going to pharm school and my wife is currently going to Vet school. I can tell you that she always seems to carry more units then I do. So academically It's more time consuming. Although as a pharm student you have to obtain a certain number intern hours. So on top of school I'm also an intern. This makes them about even IMO. I think med school and vet school are about the same. Unless you ask a vet student. They always say med student only have to learn about one species.
 

PharmD2MD

Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2005
Messages
184
Reaction score
0
Med school is harder. I graduated from pharm school in 2002, just finishing up my MS1 year now. More material, less organization.
 
Members don't see this ad :)

blueclassring

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2005
Messages
537
Reaction score
6
We had a Med-School like quarter last quarter here at MWU-CPG but it doesn't compare to what the med students go through year in and year out. There is a lot of memorization as in med school but the competition is more intense there as well.
 

jope

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
99
Reaction score
71
Having done pharmacy in Canada, and now doing medicine at the same university...hands down medical school is tougher. Way more work, way more stuff to learn.

In pharm, just reading the notes was more than enough to get near top of the class marks. In med, there's so much more material, it's nearly impossible to memorize everything exactly.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Messages
15,203
Reaction score
6,421
I actually think medical school would be easier for me because I wouldn't have the feeling that I'm wasting my time memorizing worthless crap all of the time. Morale does much for learning.
 

acetyl

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
743
Reaction score
1
I actually think medical school would be easier for me because I wouldn't have the feeling that I'm wasting my time memorizing worthless crap all of the time. Morale does much for learning.

So go become a doctor. Don't be afraid.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Messages
15,203
Reaction score
6,421
Hahahahaha, yeah, right. My GPA is too low, I have no desire to subject myself to 6+ additional years of ass kissing, and I'm too ready to start making money so I can retire young.
 

acetyl

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
743
Reaction score
1
Hahahahaha, yeah, right. My GPA is too low, I have no desire to subject myself to 6+ additional years of ass kissing, and I'm too ready to start making money so I can retire young.

I can't fault you for that, and I'm sure some of them think the same way. All ya gotta do is take some full-lengths, then put some extra good bs on that personal statement. Really it would only be 2 years of intense coursework, the other 2 years of rotations would probably be fun.

And where is this place that you live where you won't have to be ass kissing? Because I was under the impression that we have to do that our entire lives.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Messages
15,203
Reaction score
6,421
I can't fault you for that, and I'm sure some of them think the same way. All ya gotta do is take some full-lengths, then put some extra good bs on that personal statement. Really it would only be 2 years of intense coursework, the other 2 years of rotations would probably be fun.

And where is this place that you live where you won't have to be ass kissing? Because I was under the impression that we have to do that our entire lives.

Me in 20 years when I'm running businesses and ****. Then people will be kissing my ass. Nobody seems to understand that doing nothing is my goal. Well, not literally doing nothing, you know, people tell you to get a job doing something you like to do...it's just that the **** I like to do you can't get paid for. Pharmacy is the fastest way for a person with no trust fund from Appalachia to arrive at this goal outside of athletics. I'm kinda athletic, but not anywhere near NFL athletic, so that ain't happening. Pharmacy is it, yo.
 

Requiem

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Messages
950
Reaction score
4
I can't fault you for that, and I'm sure some of them think the same way. All ya gotta do is take some full-lengths, then put some extra good bs on that personal statement. Really it would only be 2 years of intense coursework, the other 2 years of rotations would probably be fun.

And where is this place that you live where you won't have to be ass kissing? Because I was under the impression that we have to do that our entire lives.

Are you a premed or something?

"The other 2 years of rotations would probably be fun." Oh god, go post that in the med student forum. Nothing like nazi surgeons pimping you at 4am and being sprayed with liters of blood mucus and amniotic fluid from Ob/Gyn. Endless H&P's and doing scutwork.

Funnnn :laugh:
 
D

da8s0859q

Hahahahaha, yeah, right. My GPA is too low, I have no desire to subject myself to 6+ additional years of ass kissing, and I'm too ready to start making money so I can retire young.

See, this is one big reason why I'm a little unsure of medicine. I'm not very good at asskissing for very long. Granted, I don't think all residencies (I'm thinking 3-4 years, not six, for my interests) amount to pure, unadulterated asskissing orgies, but what do I know.

Nobody seems to understand that doing nothing is my goal. Well, not literally doing nothing, you know, people tell you to get a job doing something you like to do...it's just that the **** I like to do you can't get paid for. Pharmacy is the fastest way for a person with no trust fund from Appalachia to arrive at this goal outside of athletics. I'm kinda athletic, but not anywhere near NFL athletic, so that ain't happening. Pharmacy is it, yo.

Doing nothing is kinda nice. Or in the words of a former professor of mine, "doing nothing is doing something."

I can't fault you for that, and I'm sure some of them think the same way. All ya gotta do is take some full-lengths, then put some extra good bs on that personal statement. Really it would only be 2 years of intense coursework, the other 2 years of rotations would probably be fun.

And where is this place that you live where you won't have to be ass kissing? Because I was under the impression that we have to do that our entire lives.

:laugh: You're a crackhead. (Although honestly, I bet we could round up at least a few happy-go-lucky MDs-to-be that love many of their rotations.)
 
Members don't see this ad :)

J ROD

Watch my TAN walk!!
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
60,661
Reaction score
13,319
Med school is harder...period.

More time consuming, more material, etc.

I just finished my first year of PharmD and thought it was easy. Not much harder than undergraduate.

I have a friend in med school and I see his materials and study schedule and it is way more intense.

I too like others probably will go to med school if I can pass the MCAT. I thought pharmacy would be enough but I want more.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Messages
15,203
Reaction score
6,421
Medical school probably is harder, but keep in mind the 1st year of pharmacy school is typically laughably easy. Have you even had a pharmacology or therapeutics class?
 

Requiem

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Messages
950
Reaction score
4
Medical school probably is harder, but keep in mind the 1st year of pharmacy school is typically laughably easy. Have you even had a pharmacology or therapeutics class?

He's right.

You'll get your "share", don't worry. I finished first year pharmacy school and I couldn't tell you anything about drugs, how they work, or anything. I knew nasonex was used to treat sinusitis or allergies cause we had to counsel fake patients on it.
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
Medical school & post-grad training dont involve much ass kissing. Youre treated like a professional from day one.

What it does involve is the ability to stay awake for 36 hours at a time, read several chapters after a 14 hour day and being able to think clearly at 4:30am...whether you just got to the hospital or have been there for an entire day.

You also have to be able to recall insane amounts of information at any time of the day or night because someone will always ask you something.

So to answer the original question of which is harder, medical school is undoubtedly harder. But if its what you want to do then you make due. I have said jokingly on several occassions "I wish I stayed in pharmacy school", but not for a minute did I ever feel that I made the wrong decision.

There is something about being a doctor that you cant really describe. Its an awesome feeling. Plus the paycheck wont be so bad either. ;)
 

J ROD

Watch my TAN walk!!
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
60,661
Reaction score
13,319
I have had an intro to med chem and pharmacology class.

I did not think it was bad. I have a 3.91 so I think I stand to take a few B+ this coming year. I hope it gets harder because I thought this was going to be an academic challenge. I am more bored than anything!!

I hope we finally do take it up a few degrees. I wish we had Honors PharmD classes like in high school. My professors waste so much time repeating concepts, etc. that class takes forever to get through the material. That's why I quit going to class half of the time last semester. I always here how bad this class is and this professor is horrible and when I get there it is never that bad. My friend just finished his second year, which is our toughest year and he actually raised his GPA (started in the 3.7 range up to 3.8).

Everyone is different. I look forward to it!!
 

Gosondth

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
69
Reaction score
6
So to answer the original question of which is harder, medical school is undoubtedly harder.

By that logic UCSD medicine must be the easiest medical program around.
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
By that logic UCSD medicine must be the easiest medical program around.

Dont really understand what youre getting at, but OK.
 

Gosondth

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
69
Reaction score
6
At UCSD, P2s take almost all second year courses with the MS1s and some of third year classes are also taken concurrently with the MS2s. In addition we are all on the same curve as the med students.

As much as most of my class complains about it, most, if not all, of us pass through it just fine.

So by your logic, either UCSD's medical program must be crazy easy or the pharmacy program here is just stupidly hard.

Either way, my point is that I don't think that any health professional degree is harder or easier than the next, we just process the information differently for our role in health care system.
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
Either way, my point is that I don't think that any health professional degree is harder or easier than the next, we just process the information differently for our role in health care system.

Then I guess we will have to agree to disagree. :)

Besides, the first 2 years of medical school arent the most difficult part.
 

dgroulx

Night Pharmacist
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2003
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
7
Med school is harder...period.

More time consuming, more material, etc.

I just finished my first year of PharmD and thought it was easy. Not much harder than undergraduate.

I have a friend in med school and I see his materials and study schedule and it is way more intense.

I too like others probably will go to med school if I can pass the MCAT. I thought pharmacy would be enough but I want more.

I'm sure med school is much more difficult than pharmacy school. I agree, the first year of pharmacy is almost exactly like undergrad. You will probably enjoy 2nd year a lot more. For first year, we mainly focused on pathophysiology. Physiology was a prerequisite, so we had to learn what happens when things go wrong. Also, you can't be expected to apply drug therapy unless you first understand the underlying disease. They also covered biochem, genetics, & micro which I had taken during undergrad already.

During year two I had pharmacology of every drug (except OTC meds) including factors that affect absorption, every side effect and every drug interaction, therapeutics of every drug - what is the correct dosage (including pediatrics) of each med for each disease state (not just 1st line therapies) this included chemotherapy regimens, HIV regimens, infectious diseases, and every chronic illness known to mankind, medicinal chemistry where we had to draw structures and mechanisms of drugs, kinetics where I had to use equations to figure out drug levels, clearance, etc, plus 3 other classes to make sure all my spare time was spent putting together power point presentations, working at a designated site and preparing a poster presentation and having to perform like a monkey for impromtu counseling sessions. This left little time for studying. Still, it wasn't that difficult as long as you kept up with the material. It was the same schedule for both semesters.

In year three, there's not as much to learn. So, they double up the pace to keep you on your toes. By the time you get to your 4th year, rotations are a breeze. I think that once you finish pharmacy school, you should have a good foundation for attending med school. If I was younger, I might have enjoyed the challenge. Now, I'm happy to rake in over 100k per year and just relax when I get home.
 
Members don't see this ad :)

J ROD

Watch my TAN walk!!
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
60,661
Reaction score
13,319
I'm sure med school is much more difficult than pharmacy school. I agree, the first year of pharmacy is almost exactly like undergrad. You will probably enjoy 2nd year a lot more. For first year, we mainly focused on pathophysiology. Physiology was a prerequisite, so we had to learn what happens when things go wrong. Also, you can't be expected to apply drug therapy unless you first understand the underlying disease. They also covered biochem, genetics, & micro which I had taken during undergrad already.

During year two I had pharmacology of every drug (except OTC meds) including factors that affect absorption, every side effect and every drug interaction, therapeutics of every drug - what is the correct dosage (including pediatrics) of each med for each disease state (not just 1st line therapies) this included chemotherapy regimens, HIV regimens, infectious diseases, and every chronic illness known to mankind, medicinal chemistry where we had to draw structures and mechanisms of drugs, kinetics where I had to use equations to figure out drug levels, clearance, etc, plus 3 other classes to make sure all my spare time was spent putting together power point presentations, working at a designated site and preparing a poster presentation and having to perform like a monkey for impromtu counseling sessions. This left little time for studying. Still, it wasn't that difficult as long as you kept up with the material. It was the same schedule for both semesters.

In year three, there's not as much to learn. So, they double up the pace to keep you on your toes. By the time you get to your 4th year, rotations are a breeze. I think that once you finish pharmacy school, you should have a good foundation for attending med school. If I was younger, I might have enjoyed the challenge. Now, I'm happy to rake in over 100k per year and just relax when I get home.


I think at my school we have a very similar structure as yours.

I am not that young though I am 27. I just want both. In med school, I think it would be nice to work some at a nice hr rate and then be able to publish some good research with my additional drug knowledge. Most students at my state med school skip and learn from home so I can work a little after I adjust. Also, being a guy I can start a family later in life after I set everything up and can have wisdom and patience. Plus, I want to marry younger. I am interested in anes, psy, and EM at the moment but things always change.

Either way I am set financially once I start working. I love the win/win scenario!!
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
27 isnt too old for medical school at all.

I have known first year medical students in their 40s.

If its what you want to do then dont let age hold you back.
 

J ROD

Watch my TAN walk!!
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
60,661
Reaction score
13,319
27 isnt too old for medical school at all.

I have known first year medical students in their 40s.

If its what you want to do then dont let age hold you back.


Thank you. I usually get what the hell is wrong with you or are you freaky crazy wanting to do both? I feel as though I am breaking some unspoken rule that you can't do both because then you are not committed to either one. But, to me, it seems that the two naturally go together. One just has to have the drive, time, and not be scared of the financial debt to complete both.

I have a MBA already so I know my money issues, etc.

I used to think I was too old until I met some on here and I have a friend that started med school at 40 with kids aged 2 and 4.

Like he said, it is your life. Do it your way. If you want both, then get both.

I do not want the family and responsibility yet. So many of my friends my age are locked done with a mortgage, kids, debt. They feel trapped and unprepared for the responsibility but there is nothing they really can do because they are stuck in many ways. They always tell me to wait and I am so lucky that I still have my freedom.

It all depends on what you want out of life. Once, you have kids they take priority and your dreams become secondary. I want to try and have it all but it just takes time to set it all up properly. GLuck to others with dreams!! Fight the good fight!!
 

max831

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
As a nontrad myself, all I can say is you can be 40 and not a doctor or 40 and a doctor. Either way you're still 40.:D
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
As a nontrad myself, all I can say is you can be 40 and not a doctor or 40 and a doctor. Either way you're still 40.:D

:thumbup:

Age doesnt mean anything when youre in chase of the most noble profession. :)

You could hand me a six figure income now and I could walk away, or you could send me to medical school and allow me to become a physician. 100 out of 100 times I will take the latter. I did it once and never looked back.
 

dgroulx

Night Pharmacist
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2003
Messages
2,642
Reaction score
7
:thumbup:

Age doesnt mean anything when youre in chase of the most noble profession. :)

Actually, age made a difference for me. I finished pharmacy school at the age of 50. When I weighed the options, I figured that my body would not hold up to the rigors of a medical residency. I think I was right.

During my second year, I developed nerve pain from degenerative discs in my neck along with bone spurs. Steroids and muscle relaxers worked for a while. I now have osteopenia in my spine, plus the nerve pain has worsened. My lower back has a bulging disc and I no longer have feeling in part of my left foot. Last year, I tore the medial meniscus in my left knee, had surgery, and finished my rotations on crutches. If I was doing a residency right now, I would shoot myself. Age takes its toll on you.
 

BernzFerguson

Go Lakers!
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2007
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
I was formerly on the premed track, but I was also considering pharmacy. I spoke with my cousins who are an MD and a DO, and I told them that I am considering pharmacy, and both cousins said that pharmacy is a lot easier way of life. So now I am seriously considering changing my direction and focusing on pharmacy, because I can say that I liked the idea of being a doctor, but was not totally in love with it. I think I would prefer a life where I do my work, get paid well, and have enough free time for family and other personal hobbies.
Can anybody involved or with knowledge of both pharmacy and medical school tell me if my direction is a good one?
 

sdn1977

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
3,547
Reaction score
19
I was formerly on the premed track, but I was also considering pharmacy. I spoke with my cousins who are an MD and a DO, and I told them that I am considering pharmacy, and both cousins said that pharmacy is a lot easier way of life. So now I am seriously considering changing my direction and focusing on pharmacy, because I can say that I liked the idea of being a doctor, but was not totally in love with it. I think I would prefer a life where I do my work, get paid well, and have enough free time for family and other personal hobbies.
Can anybody involved or with knowledge of both pharmacy and medical school tell me if my direction is a good one?

PM me if you want specifics. I might be able to help since I've been a pharmacist for 30+ years & my daughter is an MSIII & I've friends (of both sexes) in medicine, pharmacy & dentistry (husband is a dentist).

I've kept out of this discussion since the whole premise is a bit odd. It seems to me like asking which is tastes better - turnips or rutabagas. I'd honestly have to say neither...but, that's not a choice, apparently.

I like asparagus which is as unlike a turnip as pharmacists are to physicians. But, oddly enough - MSIII also likes asparagus....so - go figure!
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
I started in pharmacy school then switched to premed/medicine.

My fiancee is a pharmacist.
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
PM me if you want specifics. I might be able to help since I've been a pharmacist for 30+ years & my daughter is an MSIII & I've friends (of both sexes) in medicine, pharmacy & dentistry (husband is a dentist).

Tough to compare pharmacy school 30 years ago to pharmacy school today, let alone medical school. But that is a unique perspective you have.
 

sdn1977

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
3,547
Reaction score
19
Tough to compare pharmacy school 30 years ago to pharmacy school today, let alone medical school. But that is a unique perspective you have.

I'd agree....except - I'm a preceptor for a pharmacy school rotation & see/work with pharmacy students on a weekly basis. I'm also held to the schools accountability standards. I'm not as "out of touch" as you might think.;)
 

Caverject

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
7,738
Reaction score
39
I'd agree....except - I'm a preceptor for a pharmacy school rotation & see/work with pharmacy students on a weekly basis. I'm also held to the schools accountability standards. I'm not as "out of touch" as you might think.;)
There most certainly is someone out of touch, but it's not sdn1977...
 

Dr JPH

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2000
Messages
5,910
Reaction score
37
I'd agree....except - I'm a preceptor for a pharmacy school rotation & see/work with pharmacy students on a weekly basis. I'm also held to the schools accountability standards. I'm not as "out of touch" as you might think.;)

Never said you were out of touch.

My above statement implies a great difference in the standard of education 30 years ago to today, no?

I do, however, disagree with your impression that pharmacy and medicine are equally challenging but simply "different tastes".
 

sdn1977

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
3,547
Reaction score
19
Never said you were out of touch.

My above statement implies a great difference in the standard of education 30 years ago to today, no?

I do, however, disagree with your impression that pharmacy and medicine are equally challenging but simply "different tastes".

Indeed, you did not say I was out of touch - those were my words (tongue in cheek..). I was not trying to put words in your mouth. Unfortunately, the internet doesn't allow someone else to know I was being self-deprecating.

However, I can only compare the standard of education of what I experienced myself as a student & what I experience, at the same school btw, as a preceptor (now functioning as someone who "expects" & evaluates performance rather than someone who must perform). Additionally, I am very aware of the current issues within my state regarding educational expectations given the rapidly changing environment within the profession.

Given all that - no...the standard of education within MY school is the same as it was 30 years ago. Remember...I come from one of the most advanced programs in the country - I'd say 30 years ago....it was THE most advanced (ssssh - don't let Zpak know I said that - he'd be all over me!!!!:scared: - j/king).

Now...as to our actual responsibilities & tasks....yeah - they've changed dramatically. But - as for standards - no. They are as high now as they were then & the graduates are expected to go on and not just become clinically competent, but to also become leaders within the profession - same as what was expected of me.

But - I recognize that is just my state. I can name at least 10 other schools off the top of my head in which that is probably the same, but since I'm not a part of their school system, I cannot say for sure. I just know that their graduates in the last 5 years are as competent & able to accomodate & embrace change as their alumni who were new graduates when I was also a new graduate. I know it because I work with them - both recent graduates & older graduates like myself.

As for the different tastes & challenges......we could go on and on about the differences in medicine & pharmacy (& dentistry if you want to play that game). However...within a class of 100 or 400 of any of those fields - some will say its terribly hard, some will say its exactly the difficulty they expected & some will say its not as hard as they perceived...the basic bell curve. There are some who find pharmacy school very, very difficult & certainly MSIII has 1 or 2 in each year who had to repeat.

But - for those who want to compare professions & difficulty...well - argue away. I still say its the same as asking which is a better drug - lisinopril or ciprofloxacin (or better fruit, car, state to live in...) I'm just never gonna order turnips on the side & neither will MSIII (who btw parties much more than I EVER did - but I think that reflects our financial differences rather than our free time & ability to handle the workload. So - now I gotta go reevaluate my checkbook!:smuggrin:).
 

J ROD

Watch my TAN walk!!
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
60,661
Reaction score
13,319
Indeed, you did not say I was out of touch - those were my words (tongue in cheek..). I was not trying to put words in your mouth. Unfortunately, the internet doesn't allow someone else to know I was being self-deprecating.

However, I can only compare the standard of education of what I experienced myself as a student & what I experience, at the same school btw, as a preceptor (now functioning as someone who "expects" & evaluates performance rather than someone who must perform). Additionally, I am very aware of the current issues within my state regarding educational expectations given the rapidly changing environment within the profession.

Given all that - no...the standard of education within MY school is the same as it was 30 years ago. Remember...I come from one of the most advanced programs in the country - I'd say 30 years ago....it was THE most advanced (ssssh - don't let Zpak know I said that - he'd be all over me!!!!:scared: - j/king).

Now...as to our actual responsibilities & tasks....yeah - they've changed dramatically. But - as for standards - no. They are as high now as they were then & the graduates are expected to go on and not just become clinically competent, but to also become leaders within the profession - same as what was expected of me.

But - I recognize that is just my state. I can name at least 10 other schools off the top of my head in which that is probably the same, but since I'm not a part of their school system, I cannot say for sure. I just know that their graduates in the last 5 years are as competent & able to accomodate & embrace change as their alumni who were new graduates when I was also a new graduate. I know it because I work with them - both recent graduates & older graduates like myself.

As for the different tastes & challenges......we could go on and on about the differences in medicine & pharmacy (& dentistry if you want to play that game). However...within a class of 100 or 400 of any of those fields - some will say its terribly hard, some will say its exactly the difficulty they expected & some will say its not as hard as they perceived...the basic bell curve. There are some who find pharmacy school very, very difficult & certainly MSIII has 1 or 2 in each year who had to repeat.

But - for those who want to compare professions & difficulty...well - argue away. I still say its the same as asking which is a better drug - lisinopril or ciprofloxacin (or better fruit, car, state to live in...) I'm just never gonna order turnips on the side & neither will MSIII (who btw parties much more than I EVER did - but I think that reflects our financial differences rather than our free time & ability to handle the workload. So - now I gotta go reevaluate my checkbook!:smuggrin:).

If you are going to compare the two professions, pharmacy and medicine, to two drugs at least make them in the same class of drugs. Pharmacy and medicine are both in the healthcare arena, while an antibiotic and an ACE inhibitor are not that related. Let's say we compare lisinopril and amlodipine, used for high BP, to pharmacy and medicine to make the analogy more precise.

I do agree with your overall theme though. I just did not want any pre-pharms preparing for the PCAT to miss any more analogies than they have to if they just happended to be reading this thead and were trying to work in some extra analogy studies!!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top