Doctor Bagel

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Resident compensation by specialty seems a bit bogus as systems generally pay all residents in each PGY year the same regardless of the specialty. At my training site, some more lucrative specialties were able to provide their residents with more educational funds, but salaries were unchanged. So, duh, fellowship specialties (critical care, cardiology, etc) have higher compensation because they have higher PGY levels.

Also, there are programs that don't provide malpractice coverage? WTH -- I'm guessing the residents just answered that one wrongly. I'd also be shocked if any programs didn't provide some sort of PTO and health benefits.
 

thehundredthone

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It's quite misleading to include a statistic on pay based on gender just because it's a staple of income surveys, when residencies pay all residents the same. Unless they're insinuating that higher paying residencies don't hire women, which would be even more absurd.
 
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Doctor Bagel

so cheap and juicy
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It's quite misleading to include a statistic on pay based on gender just because it's a staple of income surveys, when residencies pay all residents the same. Unless they're insinuating that higher paying residencies don't hire women, which would be even more absurd.
Yeah, I guess maybe it could get at the fact that women do fewer fellowships (?) and are less likely to do particularly lengthy residencies like neurosurgery. That's the only reason why pay would be lower. Sure, I guess some women do part-time residencies and fellowships, but that's pretty rare for residents (seems more common for fellowships, at least in my field).

The whole pay thing in general shows a misunderstanding of resident pay.
 
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thehundredthone

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Yeah, I guess maybe it could get at the fact that women do fewer fellowships (?) and are less likely to do particularly lengthy residencies like neurosurgery. That's the only reason why pay would be lower. Sure, I guess some women do part-time residencies and fellowships, but that's pretty rare for residents (seems more common for fellowships, at least in my field).

The whole pay thing in general shows a misunderstanding of resident pay.
Exactly, hence misleading. Not stratifying these data is one of the big problems with this survey. The benefits over and above pay are more interesting to see, I can't believe a program wouldn't provide malpractice and health insurance (whether you can refuse it is irrelevant).
 

calvnandhobbs68

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One of the most useless surveys I've ever seen in my life. The fact that they even break it down by gender and seem to not know what a fellowship is makes it total garbage. Cardiology is not a residency derp.
 
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studenthealth12

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Resident compensation by specialty seems a bit bogus as systems generally pay all residents in each PGY year the same regardless of the specialty. At my training site, some more lucrative specialties were able to provide their residents with more educational funds, but salaries were unchanged. So, duh, fellowship specialties (critical care, cardiology, etc) have higher compensation because they have higher PGY levels.

Also, there are programs that don't provide malpractice coverage? WTH -- I'm guessing the residents just answered that one wrongly. I'd also be shocked if any programs didn't provide some sort of PTO and health benefits.
I have never heard of a program not offering malpractice coverage! That would be a major problem obviously. You are right, probably incorrectly answered
 

link2swim06

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It's quite misleading to include a statistic on pay based on gender just because it's a staple of income surveys, when residencies pay all residents the same. Unless they're insinuating that higher paying residencies don't hire women, which would be even more absurd.
Three big confounders:

1. They don't control for location. Different locations have different ratios of women to men. In other words more men live in slightly higher paying areas.

2. The percent of women in medicine is increasing. There are probably more PGY-1 women than PGY-3 women as the percent increases. This pulls the average closer to the PGY-1 salary for women and the average closer to the PGY-3+ average for men.

3. I bet proportionally more men do fellowships (can't provide data on that though). This would pull the average up for men.


This is why it drive me NUTS when people are saying "women are getting paid only a % of what men get paid for the same job." If it take out ALL the confounders it going to be basically the same.
 
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DoctwoB

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Some of the data is clearly off. 15% of medical residents don't get health insurance? 10% don't get any form of paid vacation?
 

Crayola227

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Like this matters at all.

As far as less pay for women, it might make sense to wikipedia Simpson's paradox. A lot of confounders at work I'm sure on this. I'm the first to say b*tches get a bum rap, but in the world of GME each PGY gets what they get, I can't believe gender factors in at all for gross salary. Granted, if a female resident is more likely to take unpaid leave or have child-related expenses, that would be a factor in their budget but even I can hardly say that the program should pay a female worker more because she has a certain amount of fixed expense for childcare a male colleague does not. That's what tax credits and other societal support structures that may or may not be in place are there for.

It doesn't matter at all because I hardly think resident pay should be anything but the lowest consideration. What counts more are things like competitiveness of specialty, fellowship considerations, research opportunities, geographics like cost of living in area, safety, commute, plans to buy vs rent in the area, childcare, schooling opportunities for kids, spouse employment opportunities, family distance, call schedule, rotation schedule, what rotations, vacation time/pay, what are terms of healthcare insurance (these can vary greatly residency to residency all else being equal), plans available, monthly premium, adding dependents, prescription drug coverage, copays, deductible, out of pocket maximum

That was a jumble but can be divided into things that will impact quality of life, and factors that affect take home pay (state taxes, employee contribution to medical/dental) and how far take home pay takes you given cost of living in area and where else your money has to go (kids, etc).

Some residencies do not technically provide health insurance, in that the resident has to buy their own through the health exchange and I'm not sure then what the program has to do as an employer towards that, or some frankly don't offer much better than catastrophic or crazy high deductible, residents may be checking off the wrong box because the health benefits are such that they are so bad that it may as well have been none.

I don't know exactly how Obamacare played in to this, I do know that some places health benefits were shockingly bad almost lacking to a point that when I looked at programs (before Obamacare was full force) there were programs I couldn't even consider because of what my out of pocket would have been in comparison to salary.

My program was pretty good in this regard except that premiums, deductible, copays, prescription drug coverage, up to out of pocket maximum meant a guaranteed 6K right off my salary.

But that was better than places where coverage for my meds would have left me paying $1500 a month out of pocket.

If you have any chronic conditions or your family does, you definitely need to read the fine print on the programs health benefits, etc, that will make more of a financial difference that you'll feel than the gross salary differences program to program.

In fact, most of the time the little contract they hand you and their website is not helpful AT ALL for figuring out what health benefits will be like. I had to contact each HR personally and individually for like 90% of programs to get any real feel for that expense at all.

But these are the sort of real-life budgetary concerns that Medscape survey is zero helpful for.
 

SLC

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Like this matters at all.

As far as less pay for women, it might make sense to wikipedia Simpson's paradox. A lot of confounders at work I'm sure on this. I'm the first to say b*tches get a bum rap, but in the world of GME each PGY gets what they get, I can't believe gender factors in at all for gross salary. Granted, if a female resident is more likely to take unpaid leave or have child-related expenses, that would be a factor in their budget but even I can hardly say that the program should pay a female worker more because she has a certain amount of fixed expense for childcare a male colleague does not. That's what tax credits and other societal support structures that may or may not be in place are there for.

It doesn't matter at all because I hardly think resident pay should be anything but the lowest consideration. What counts more are things like competitiveness of specialty, fellowship considerations, research opportunities, geographics like cost of living in area, safety, commute, plans to buy vs rent in the area, childcare, schooling opportunities for kids, spouse employment opportunities, family distance, call schedule, rotation schedule, what rotations, vacation time/pay, what are terms of healthcare insurance (these can vary greatly residency to residency all else being equal), plans available, monthly premium, adding dependents, prescription drug coverage, copays, deductible, out of pocket maximum

That was a jumble but can be divided into things that will impact quality of life, and factors that affect take home pay (state taxes, employee contribution to medical/dental) and how far take home pay takes you given cost of living in area and where else your money has to go (kids, etc).

Some residencies do not technically provide health insurance, in that the resident has to buy their own through the health exchange and I'm not sure then what the program has to do as an employer towards that, or some frankly don't offer much better than catastrophic or crazy high deductible, residents may be checking off the wrong box because the health benefits are such that they are so bad that it may as well have been none.

I don't know exactly how Obamacare played in to this, I do know that some places health benefits were shockingly bad almost lacking to a point that when I looked at programs (before Obamacare was full force) there were programs I couldn't even consider because of what my out of pocket would have been in comparison to salary.

My program was pretty good in this regard except that premiums, deductible, copays, prescription drug coverage, up to out of pocket maximum meant a guaranteed 6K right off my salary.

But that was better than places where coverage for my meds would have left me paying $1500 a month out of pocket.

If you have any chronic conditions or your family does, you definitely need to read the fine print on the programs health benefits, etc, that will make more of a financial difference that you'll feel than the gross salary differences program to program.

In fact, most of the time the little contract they hand you and their website is not helpful AT ALL for figuring out what health benefits will be like. I had to contact each HR personally and individually for like 90% of programs to get any real feel for that expense at all.

But these are the sort of real-life budgetary concerns that Medscape survey is zero helpful for.
QFT!

I was lucky that my program's hospital pays 100% of insurance costs, and the coverage is actually quite good.

Some other programs were not even considerations because I could never afford to live.
 
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rokshana

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could have thought paid and not just offered...and some places may not give personal days (my residency didn't but everything was either vacation of sick days) or may not give sick days...
 

Raryn

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could have thought paid and not just offered...and some places may not give personal days (my residency didn't but everything was either vacation of sick days) or may not give sick days...
I could be wrong, but at least at the institutions I've looked at, all programs (officially) have sick days. Many might have a culture of discouraging you from using them and certainly may have a policy of you having to use what might otherwise be a day off to "make up" the sick day, but none I know have absolutely no mechanism for you to call in if you have a fever of 104 and are having projectile vomiting from both ends of your GI tract.

Personal days are much rarer. My program lets us take a few for job/fellowship interviewing in our last year, assuming we're not on an inpatient rotation, but that's it.
 

Bacchus

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I'm being payed like a CC fellow. Woowee!