Rheumination1

2+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2014
34
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Does anyone know how accurate the MGMA data is? As a fresh resident (IM-hospitalist) or as a fresh medicine fellow, I understand we get paid less than more established individuals (or partners if in a private practice) but should the salary be closer to the lowest 10th percentile or be more towards the 25th or the median? This is in the setting for a suburb of a large urban city.

Trying to negotiate contracts here, hopefully the responses won't be the blind leading the blind. ;-)

Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 

gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2005
18,356
11,312
Status
Attending Physician
I can't comment on the accuracy of the data, but my salary and productivity bonus goals are calculated based on it.
 

gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2005
18,356
11,312
Status
Attending Physician
Not rheumatology


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 
OP
R

Rheumination1

2+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2014
34
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Why does it matter what specialty someone is? Seems irrelevant to the topic of discussion.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 

Raryn

Infernal Internist / Enigmatic Endocrinologist
10+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2008
7,704
6,617
Status
Attending Physician
Why does it matter what specialty someone is? Seems irrelevant to the topic of discussion.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
It's entirely feasible that MGMA data is more accurate for some specialties than others.

That said, you have to consider the practice environment and the details of the contract. MGMA is probably the most accurate set of data we have, but if you're looking at academic jobs, you would be much better off using the AAMC data (which will show that academia pays substantially less than private group).

If you're getting just an employed community gig somewhere without a partnership track and you're working full time, you probably should be getting somewhere close to the median for your specialty/region, as adjusted for your practice environment (big city=less generally speaking). Now, that might not be the exact median but I'd be concerned if I wasn't getting the 25th percentile for a regular, full-time gig that doesn't have opportunity for advancement.

If it's a partnership track, you might get less than that initially, but that would transition to more than that once you became a partner. As above, academics is less. Obviously <full-time jobs are less. There's probably a million other factors as well.
 
OP
R

Rheumination1

2+ Year Member
Aug 31, 2014
34
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thanks! Really appreciate the detailed answer. And are most partnership tracks 2-3 years?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
 

Raryn

Infernal Internist / Enigmatic Endocrinologist
10+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2008
7,704
6,617
Status
Attending Physician
Thanks! Really appreciate the detailed answer. And are most partnership tracks 2-3 years?


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
That doesn't sound unreasonable but I don't know if one can really generalize. I've heard a lot of different scenarios regarding timelines, buy-in requirements, etc