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Mid-Atlantic Programs

Discussion in 'PM&R' started by mehul_25, Nov 30, 2002.

  1. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!
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    Hello Everyone,

    I wanted to get some information about programs that are not often mentioned on this site.

    In particular, I was curious as to any information people had on the programs in Baltimore and Washington DC.

    I have always had a great impression of National Rehab in DC and I wanted to know if others shared this.

    Thanks
     
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  3. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!!
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    I am suprised that no one has any opinions on my previous post.

    I have actually matched into the NRH program for next year and I am just curious as to the preception of the program. I look into this site from time to time and I have never seen it mentioned. Anyway, just curious.
     
  4. prominence

    prominence Senior Member
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  5. drvlad2004

    drvlad2004 Senior Member
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    I did a one month elective at NRH (with loose affiliation with Georgetown). Personally, I think it is a mid-tier program that shows promise for the future. I thought some of the program's drawbacks were:

    1. Weak Musculoskeletal rehab training--> some of the residents I spoke to were very unhappy about this, especially with the increasing demand for msk specialists. One of the msk rehab physicians is a rheumatologist, not a physiatrist, if you don't mind.

    2. Medical director of NRH is a neurologist. Director of TBI is also a neurologist. There just didn't seem to be many physiatrists working at NRH, even if it is a small program. However, with the # of neurologists on staff, the neurorehab seems to be good. They have an internationally reknown expert on post-polio syndrome.

    Their therapy staff seem to be top-notch. That is where I think the hospital gets its favorable ranking in USnews. Other than that, there is not much else that makes NRH stand out compared to most residency programs I've interviewed that. It's great that the residents get to rotate through Walter Reed. Walter Reed's residency programs is very strong in EMG and this is the only place that NRH residents complete the required 200 EMGs to sit in for boards.

    The PGY2 through PGY4 years is set up like most PM&R programs nowadays. PGY2 is all inpatient while PGY3&4 is outpatient. I thought that the program is average but not right for me. Due to my osteopathic training, nutrition, and exercise science background, an ideal PM&R residency program must have strong MSK department (both inpatient and outpatient). I naturally lean towards the msk aspects of rehab. NRH seemed to lagging behind in that. Being that NRH is in DC, the patient population is diverse and you will see many pathologies. NRH is one of the nicest facilities that I've seen. However, the program is still a work in progress. Most of the residents seem satifisfied with the program.
     
  6. Spengler874

    Spengler874 New Member

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    Perhaps Mehul_25 would like to post some of his feelings on the program, now that he has been there for 6 months. Whaddaya say? This might be a more valuable review than those of us who only interviewed there.

    For my part, I was very pleased with my interview at NRH. I thought Dr. Miller was by far the best, most hands on and most interested program director that I met. Moreover, I felt that the interviewers were very well acquainted with my application, and had very specific questions for me. They were interested in me and my motivations for getting into rehab. (One of the interviewers was a shrink!) In a nutshell, I do not believe a person going into rehab for the "plenty of money and relaxation" aspect would do well there, or even get through the interview.

    Everyone I met there was very excited by NRH and about what they did there. The interviewers and staff were really interested in saying why they thought I ought to come there. In short, they tried to sell the place. They were enthusiastic. This was a sharp contrast to other top tier programs I interviewed at, who seemed more interested in expecting me to throw MYSELF at THEM, because of their reputation. In my book, that is a big turn off.

    I cannot speak too much about the curriculum at NRH, as I have never rotated there. However, it seemed as strong as anywhere else, and the morning lecture I attended was very well done, well attended, and there was a good discussion afterwards. When questions were asked, the residents were right on the ball with answers. If you are interested in research, you can do a 6 month rotation at NIH, which I am sure looks good on a CV. You also get to rotate through Georgetown, Walter Reed and I believe Bethesda. According to Dr. Miller, they are putting together a program in cancer rehab, which is something most places I interviewed at either simply paid lip service to or ignored entirely. NRH seems like a place interested in growth, and they seem to have a plan in that regard.

    All in all, NRH came across as a very collegial, nice place to work. They have several attendings who have national and international reputations, and the residents seemed happy. I cannot imagine you would get a bad education there. While they may not have the raw name recognition that some of the bigger places do (i.e. RIC/Harvard/Baylor/UW/etc), I only ranked *one* of those places higher than NRH, and then only for reasons that were unrelated and had to do with geography and employment of my spouse rather than quality. If there were no other factors to be considered, I would have ranked them #1 by far.

    I'd really encourage people to check out NRH if they get an interview. I hate to be overly enthusiastic, but I felt the previous poster sold NRH a little short. (And he may be right, since he rotated there. What do I know?) I thought I'd throw something in here, since I found it very attractive. As I said, the most valuable opinion would likely be that of the above Mehul, as he has been there for a solid 6 months.
     
  7. drvlad2004

    drvlad2004 Senior Member
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    Spengler,

    My elective there was a musculoskeletal rehab elective. Thus, my perceptions of the program will be different. Being given a rheumatologist (who is one of the main faculty members on msk rehab), instead of a physiatrist, to follow during the elective definitely altered my perception of the program. I still though that they have a good program. Depending on what you are looking for in a rehab program, I think that NRH is a great fit for certain applicants.
     

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