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Military prestige

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by czanetti, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. czanetti

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    I am very interested in the HPSP but I am looking at it from perhaps a diferent perspective. I want to go into preventive medicine, my career goals include genting involved in health policy, and induce drastic change in our health care system. I am interested in this scholarship and the officer position becuase I think the experience for one would be very advantagous and I think that the position would gain me respect and connections in my future job ambitions. I would like to know what anyone thinks about me looking into HPSP for these reasons, and weather my ideas of what the position would bring are even romotely accurate. Thanks
     
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  3. Heeed!

    Heeed! On target, On time!
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    If you want to make permanent, lasting, "drastic changes," the military is NOT for you. The changes in the military occur as each new commander arrives on station q 2-3 years. IMO, you won't get "respect and connections" through military service in preventative medicine, and from what you stated about your reasons to join, I think you would be disappointed overall.
     
  4. orbitsurgMD

    orbitsurgMD Senior Member
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    There are opportunities in the services for occupational medicine and preventive medicine trained physicians. They often are assigned to billets with clinics, although senior medical officer flight surgeons usually do aerospace/occupational medicine and have carrier assignments. But if what you are really interested in is health policy and academic policy research, a combined M.D./MPH or Ph.D. program might be a better fit. Alternatively, doing post-doctoral studies at RAND or a similar think-tank academic institution might be just as good. Health care policy research is coming mostly from major academic centers and quasi-public institutions like the Institute of Medicine, not the military.
     
  5. colbgw02

    colbgw02 Delightfully Tacky
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    i think you're accurate insofar as the military tends to be associated with individuals with good leadership and managerial skills.

    however, if experience and leadership is what you really want, you'd be much better served by becoming some sort of line officer (combat arms for the army) and serving directly with soldiers, seamen, airmen, or marines. if you're a woman, then becoming a pilot or an MP is probably the closest they'll let you get to that. these folks are the ones who tend to very high-speed and have the skill set that corporate america tends to look for when they decide to leave the military.

    the military doesn't have a monopoly on the development of these qualities, but they are probably found with greater frequency in active duty frontline type servicemembers. in either case, military medicine is not the best place to effect wide-sweeping social, political, and/or medical change, nor is it the only place available to develop the skills relevant to implementing those far-reaching changes.

    bottom line is - only join the military if you like it or feel an obgliation to join. you'll find that all other considerations quickly become peripheral.
     
  6. IgD

    IgD The Lorax
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    If you are interested in public health and preventative medicine then military medicine is for you! You start as a clinician and can stay on that track if you want. Alternatively as you move up the food chain you go from department head to service line leader. Eventually you can become a hospital CO or even higher up. Many military medicine types end up as senior executive officers in the civilian world for example at a HMO. The military has programs where you can get a MBA or MPH.
     
  7. former military

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    Yes, the military is for you.... you are the exact opposite of me.
     
  8. orbitsurgMD

    orbitsurgMD Senior Member
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    Or if you have to.

    Ain't necessarily so.

    Not that any of these things will happen for you. Sort of like saying "come to work at our company; you could even become president*. . . (*some restrictions apply)."

    CORRECTION: Some military medicine types occasionally end up as senior executive officers in the civilian world. Most do not.

    The military won't necessarily let you go to those programs, however.
    Sort of like telling the non-college-bound high school graduate that the military has great aircraft they can learn to fly.

    IgD is a recruiter. Treat what he says with suspicion.
     
  9. dexadental

    dexadental 1K Member
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    Didn't know IgD was a recruiter...is this true? If so, don't you think he'd be stressing one particular branch over another? Secondly, why would he waste his time trolling SDN and posting pro military comments when his whole goal is to recruit for himself - not persuade people to join who live thousands of miles away. I don't think he is one, but if he is, it be nice to know for the sake of others.
     
  10. IgD

    IgD The Lorax
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    No I'm not a recruiter. LOL I think its funny how people get defensive around here when anyone says anything remotely pro-military. One of the career paths in military medicine really does teach you how to write public policy and prepare you for a career in executive medicine.
     
  11. dexadental

    dexadental 1K Member
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    I agree, I think a military background is excellent for a career in public policy centered upon healthcare. I also agree with you that too many people on these boards bash the military based on solely their personal experiences. However, it is good we have people with all different points of views to make such a decision as to join. Didn't think you were a recruiter anyway, ;)
     
  12. Heeed!

    Heeed! On target, On time!
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    I don't think it's the pro-military comments. I just think you haven't revealed enough about your background. You speak as one with authority but haven't given yourself much credibility. You're under no obligation to do so, but until you do, everything you comment on will be judged suspiciously, IMHO.
     
  13. JA_Perez

    JA_Perez Member
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    It is well known that the NAVY and most of the military is "civilianizing" military positions like Occupational Health. Since they want all physicians to be at "the tip of the spear", clinic oriented specialties like Occ Health are being outsourced to civilians, while military docs will be mostly deployed. Additionally, chances of promotion as an Occ. Health Physician are getting slimmer overtime. (I work in an Occupational Health Clinic with the Navy) Just my two cents... :idea:
     
  14. IgD

    IgD The Lorax
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    As I recall, some of the astronauts on the space shuttle were from Navy medicine. They had flight surgery and preventive medicine backgrounds.
     
  15. Dancing Doctor

    Dancing Doctor Redneck Woman
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    Have you thought about doubling your degree with an MPH? This will bring you respect in the world of public heath as well as bring you in contact (if you so choose) with people who can help you change public policy.

    Also, did you think about urban/rural medicine? I know that in rural medical practices you can make drastic changes and work hard to educate the area on preventitive medicine techniques. There is a highly competitive scholarship (similar to HSPS) or a loan repayment program with the National Health Service Corps (NHSC). I grew up in a rural area and for the most part the people there have great respect.

    Finally I think that in all medicine the impact you have depends on who you're treating and how you relate to them. If your patients respect you as a person and respect your opinion, you're going to have more of an impact.
     

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