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MS vs BS for PA

jules0328

DOSchoolWannaBe
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
    I am currently researching PA programs and noticed that there are MS programs for PA. Is there a major difference between obtaining an MS vs a BS??? Are there any salary differences? I am in NY and currently there are not too many MS PA programs but before I go ahead and apply, I was wondering if anyone may know this.

    I am also going to go and ask my advisor but thats not until next week. If anyone knows this answer, I would really appreciate it.
     

    hospPA

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    Apr 23, 2003
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      jules0328 said:
      I am currently researching PA programs and noticed that there are MS programs for PA. Is there a major difference between obtaining an MS vs a BS??? Are there any salary differences? I am in NY and currently there are not too many MS PA programs but before I go ahead and apply, I was wondering if anyone may know this.

      I am also going to go and ask my advisor but thats not until next week. If anyone knows this answer, I would really appreciate it.

      There is no difference in the education you will receive, only the degree. The PA profession is moving towards the masters for all programs. I would get the masters if you can.

      Good luck,

      Pat
       

      quicksilver2

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      Sep 29, 2005
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        Educationally, there's no difference. However, as noted previously, more programs are going the master's route. Also, in the petty world of medical politics, it does give you more "credibility" when you have a master's degree if someone chooses to point fingers at your credentials.

        I do know that if you are considering being faculty at any sort of health professions academic institution (PA school, med school, etc), they often will require a minimum of a master's degree if you're doing anything more than a guest lecture or two.

        Finally, if you find yourself at a bachelor's-level program, all is not lost if the above factors are important to you -- there are several programs out there that allow you to attain a master's degree (in health services or some other similar title) without too much more trouble. Many are "distance ed", so physical location is less of a factor.
         
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        guetzow

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          I wouldn't worry too much about the Master's unless you're considering academia or a hospital gig. Everybody knows private practice and groups pay more than hospitals, anyways, so 'who cares' about hospital politics. You can always do the distance ed thing later if you want, in your specialty no less. Why have a generic PA masters when you can get credit for specialty experience? Seems like the 'only' reason (Other than insecurity) to get a masters right out of the starting gate is if you have an eye on academia. I'd be willing to bet pounds to schillings that most University gigs would be tickled to hire a PA with loads of experience (Say, 10+ years with a few specialties) anyways, and would gingerly look the other way if you happened to get a distance masters later. Don't sweat it. The main thing is you pass the PANCE. There's plenty o fools running about with stacks of degrees.
           

          jules0328

          DOSchoolWannaBe
          10+ Year Member
          5+ Year Member
            Yeah, thanks for the info guys. I really appreciate. I am currently undergoing a post bacc and was going the pre med route but due to life circumstances, I have decided to do PA. And I am really happy with my decision. The university that I am currently attending has a PA program and I can most likely get right in....but it is a BS. There is another program around my house that gives an MS. Problem is, they require two semesters of math and my math courses are really old (about 9 years) and they are not that great grade-wise so I would probably have to re take them. At this stage, I really dont feel like wasting any more money in taking prereqs, since I have been taking pre-reqs for two years now.

            My ultimate goal is to specialize anyway....anyone else have anymore enlightening information for me? Thanks in advance.
             

            JustaPA

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              It is probably too late to make any difference in your choice on this matter, but I would say go for the B.S. and if you want an M.S. you can get it after you graduate. There are programs set up specifically to make it convenient to attain the masters.

              Specializing can be done through a post grad program or simply getting training from your supervising physician. A lot of Docs like to teach you to do things the way they happen to like it done. Location also changes the minimum requirement for employability. Some States require an M.S. to get license, others require one for prescribing rights.
               

              krust3

              medical vagabond
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              Oct 22, 2004
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                if this guy already has his bachelor degree, then just get the master's. why get a second bachelor. nationwide the push is toward a master's degree anyway. some states are soon to make the prescribing privilages only available to masters and PA's grandfathered in. with the NP's moving toward Ph.D. programs, we've gotta keep up. and i've certainly been met with more respect (deserving or not) by having my master's both from patients and physician colleagues.
                 
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