Sep 8, 2014
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MD/PhD Student
Is is considered poor form to apply to multiple programs in the same department?

For example, I was checking out SFSU, and they have a number of different programs I could see myself applying to:

Does applying to 2 or 3 of these decrease my chances of being accepted?

I'm considering this because I'd like the be accepted into a more research-based programs to help me step into a PhD program down the line. However, I don't have research experience. I have plenty of clinical experience that may help me get into the more terminal-degree type programs. So I'd like to apply to both types just in case.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance.
 

acclivity

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Is is considered poor form to apply to multiple programs in the same department?

For example, I was checking out SFSU, and they have a number of different programs I could see myself applying to:

Does applying to 2 or 3 of these decrease my chances of being accepted?

I'm considering this because I'd like the be accepted into a more research-based programs to help me step into a PhD program down the line. However, I don't have research experience. I have plenty of clinical experience that may help me get into the more terminal-degree type programs. So I'd like to apply to both types just in case.

Thoughts?

Thanks in advance.
Some schools require you to only apply to one program. I know that Northwestern makes students either apply to their Weinberg or Feinberg program. Applicants can't apply to both.
 
OP
J
Sep 8, 2014
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MD/PhD Student
Thank you. Regarding programs that do not limit you specifically to one program, my question is about how this may be perceived by admissions.
 
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MCParent

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Those seem like fairly divergent programs to me.

I think the "story" you tell for your goals is important. e.g., if you want to be a neuropsych, maybe applying to the brain & behavior program and clinical program make sense; if you want to be an organization consultant, maybe the I/O and clinical ones make sense.

I don't know this program or their emphasis areas so that's just a suggestion.
 
OP
J
Sep 8, 2014
26
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MD/PhD Student
Yes, thank you. As I mentioned above, I have different reasons for wanting to apply to the different programs. I understand that I will be making different arguments when applying to each.

My question is: Is it likely that an admissions department would notice this crossover? Would they view it as a sign of inconsistency or lack of focus?
 

modestmousktr

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Jan 22, 2013
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I think it would probably be looked upon poorly. Just my personal opinion, and I am a student who has not sat on an admissions board, but it may seem like you are unclear about your goals and simply want to go to THAT school, and by applying to many programs, you may feel you are increasing your odds. This is just stuff my mentors have told me over the years.

For example, I would be happy obtaining my Ph.D. in either Clinical Psychology or Social Work due to the overlap in the fields, and both would allow me to accomplish many of my professional goals. A lot of the schools I am applying to offer a Ph.D. in Clinical Psych and a Ph.D. in Social Work, but I honestly am a little frightened that this would become known in both departments, and they might get the idea that I am just trying to go to their school, not that I am interested in working with a particular faculty or dedicated to one degree program. Another example is Clinical vs. Counseling. At University of Oregon, I would love to apply to both as there are faculty in both that I love, but again, I just have this gut feeling it's not the right thing to do.
 
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OP
J
Sep 8, 2014
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Thank you so much, modestmousktr. You've been so helpful, both in this thread and in the other one I posted recently about CA schools. I truly appreciate your responses.
 
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Hey JS, as I was glancing through the SFSU website, it appears that the MA is more geared towards research experience whereas the MS programs would be more for practice at the Masters level. If your goal is to become a psychologist then the research programs would likely make more sense. You might want to contact the people that are either heading up the research labs or maybe one of the students working there and ask them about it.
 
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