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I think this is why a lot of doctors look down on pharmacists. Walk into a pharmacy, and what's the first thing you see? Lots and lots of vitamin supplements, plus other homeopathic crap. We need to remove these things from our profession, and focus only on meds that work.
 

YourMD

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This study was not preformed correctly. There is alot of bias involved here. Nutrients including vitamins and minerals are the basic components used for cellular metabolism. This is widely accepted and has been proved centuries ago. Of Course, multivitamins are beneficial to the diet. In todays society of mass production the average individual does not consume the proper amount of whole foods. Thus, It is essentially for us the get these nutrients through alternative sources. As a pharmacy student you should have been taught the analyze, quantify, and make sound judgement of studies like the one posted above.
Just because it's on the internet does not make it true.
 

JoBreeze

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Haha.

My MD... Doubtful.
This study was not preformed correctly. There is alot of bias involved here. Nutrients including vitamins and minerals are the basic components used for cellular metabolism. This is widely accepted and has been proved centuries ago. Of Course, multivitamins are beneficial to the diet. In todays society of mass production the average individual does not consume the proper amount of whole foods. Thus, It is essentially for us the get these nutrients through alternative sources. As a pharmacy student you should have been taught the analyze, quantify, and make sound judgement of studies like the one posted above.
Just because it's on the internet does not make it true.
 

ancienbon

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This study was not preformed correctly. There is alot of bias involved here. Nutrients including vitamins and minerals are the basic components used for cellular metabolism. This is widely accepted and has been proved centuries ago. Of Course, multivitamins are beneficial to the diet. In todays society of mass production the average individual does not consume the proper amount of whole foods. Thus, It is essentially for us the get these nutrients through alternative sources. As a pharmacy student you should have been taught the analyze, quantify, and make sound judgement of studies like the one posted above.
Just because it's on the internet does not make it true.
My Md, you must be kidding me!!!
 

Old Timer

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This study was not preformed correctly. There is alot of bias involved here. Nutrients including vitamins and minerals are the basic components used for cellular metabolism. This is widely accepted and has been proved centuries ago. Of Course, multivitamins are beneficial to the diet. In todays society of mass production the average individual does not consume the proper amount of whole foods. Thus, It is essentially for us the get these nutrients through alternative sources. As a pharmacy student you should have been taught the analyze, quantify, and make sound judgement of studies like the one posted above.
Just because it's on the internet does not make it true.
You'll learn if you every do get into medical school that science is evidence based. Your statement is true in that:
Nutrients including vitamins and minerals are the basic components used for cellular metabolism. T
What has almost never been proved is that taking these nutrients in pill form as opposed to through the diet has any beneficial effect on health at all. You have ZERO science to back up your claim. It's the same with cholesterol. Statins lower cholesterol and reduce cardiac events. Zetia reduces cholesterol, but has no effect on cardiac events. The science is what the science is and the clinical evidence is against supplements, especially daily multivitamin supplements.
 
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YourMD

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You'll learn if you every do get into medical school that science is evidence based. Your statement is true in that:


What has almost never been proved is that taking these nutrients in pill form as opposed to through the diet has any beneficial effect on health at all. You have ZERO science to back up your claim. It's the same with cholesterol. Statins lower cholesterol and reduce cardiac events. Zetia reduces cholesterol, but has no effect on cardiac events. The science is what the science is and the clinical evidence is against supplements, especially daily multivitamin supplements.
I may need to buy you all a subscription to PubMed. One simple search will yield TONS of results on the benefits of administering exogenous vitamins and minerals if one can not obtain these through their diet. I urge you all to do some more research before attempting to jump down my throat. As a quick illustration Ill simply mention TPN mixtures. Pharmacist are responsible for mixing these as they do have the ability to prolong lifespan in chronically ill patients. What do you think these mixtures are made of? Again, I urge you to do some research and not be so quick in making your conclusions.
 

zelman

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I may need to buy you all a subscription to PubMed. One simple search will yield TONS of results on the benefits of administering exogenous vitamins and minerals if one can not obtain these through their diet. I urge you all to do some more research before attempting to jump down my throat. As a quick illustration Ill simply mention TPN mixtures. Pharmacist are responsible for mixing these as they do have the ability to prolong lifespan in chronically ill patients. What do you think these mixtures are made of? Again, I urge you to do some research and not be so quick in making your conclusions.
If you do Bloodwork and find that someone is anemic, then administration of iron (and/or folic acid and/or B12) will help them. If you do Bloodwork and find that someone is not anemic, then iron will constipate them and do little else. Nobody here is saying vitamin D doesn't prevent ricketts (non-genetic abnormality type). However, people with varied diets (e.g. Non-vegans) have not been found to be healthier by taking multivitamins. Please use your pubmed search to find anything to the contrary and report back.
 
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Sparda29

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I may need to buy you all a subscription to PubMed. One simple search will yield TONS of results on the benefits of administering exogenous vitamins and minerals if one can not obtain these through their diet. I urge you all to do some more research before attempting to jump down my throat. As a quick illustration Ill simply mention TPN mixtures. Pharmacist are responsible for mixing these as they do have the ability to prolong lifespan in chronically ill patients. What do you think these mixtures are made of? Again, I urge you to do some research and not be so quick in making your conclusions.
TPNs that we do here are a mixture of amino acids and dextrose.

Sodium chloride, potassium chloride, potassium/sodium phosphate, regular insulin, are added according to the most recent results from the patients Chem7. They add multivitamins sometimes, but lately they haven't been ordering them as part of the TPN.
 

Old Timer

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I may need to buy you all a subscription to PubMed. One simple search will yield TONS of results on the benefits of administering exogenous vitamins and minerals if one can not obtain these through their diet. I urge you all to do some more research before attempting to jump down my throat. As a quick illustration Ill simply mention TPN mixtures. Pharmacist are responsible for mixing these as they do have the ability to prolong lifespan in chronically ill patients. What do you think these mixtures are made of? Again, I urge you to do some research and not be so quick in making your conclusions.
You need to learn to argue with logic. TPN has zero in common with Centrum Silver. Enlighten me with some of your pub med studies. Something that shows supplementation does anything. I'm not speaking about iron for iron deficiency or vitamin D for low vitamin D levels. I think you would be hard pressed to find more than a handful of studies that support your view that supplements are beneficial and of the handful, I would also bet that most of them were paid for by the supplement industry. Additionally, if the diet is not providing the nutrients, change the friggin diet and don't pop pills.

By the way, nobody is jumping down your throat. You made an unsupportable statement and we are disputing same and asking you to provide some evidence.
 

YourMD

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You need to learn to argue with logic. TPN has zero in common with Centrum Silver. Enlighten me with some of your pub med studies. Something that shows supplementation does anything. I'm not speaking about iron for iron deficiency or vitamin D for low vitamin D levels. I think you would be hard pressed to find more than a handful of studies that support your view that supplements are beneficial and of the handful, I would also bet that most of them were paid for by the supplement industry. Additionally, if the diet is not providing the nutrients, change the friggin diet and don't pop pills.

By the way, nobody is jumping down your throat. You made an unsupportable statement and we are disputing same and asking you to provide some evidence.
Your lack of knowledge is really disappointing especially for a pharmacist. First of all the vast majority of TPN mixtures contain some of the same elements as a Centrum silver tablet. Granted they do differ in overall composition and method of administration. Here is supporting documentation from a credible source http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/CANCER/pedresource/pedres_docs/tpn.pdf Now, if you read my original post in it's entirety, you would notice that I mentioned vitamin and mineral supplements are beneficial for patients who can not get them through their diet. Although this is very basic healthcare and everyone who has commented agrees with statement in one way or another I will also post a link supporting this as well. I never claimed vitamins are beneficial for patients with a proper diet. However, I for one do eat a proper balanced diet, regardless I am potassium deficient and I have been since childhood. I must take K+ supplements in order the stay healthy. Through blood tests my doctors have showed that my K+ supplementation is doing the trick. I'm off to bed, tomorrow I will post another link as promised.
 

zelman

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Your lack of knowledge is really disappointing especially for a pharmacist. First of all the vast majority of TPN mixtures contain some of the same elements as a Centrum silver tablet. Granted they do differ in overall composition and method of administration. Here is supporting documentation from a credible source http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/CANCER/pedresource/pedres_docs/tpn.pdf Now, if you read my original post in it's entirety, you would notice that I mentioned vitamin and mineral supplements are beneficial for patients who can not get them through their diet. Although this is very basic healthcare and everyone who has commented agrees with statement in one way or another I will also post a link supporting this as well. I never claimed vitamins are beneficial for patients with a proper diet. However, I for one do eat a proper balanced diet, regardless I am potassium deficient and I have been since childhood. I must take K+ supplements in order the stay healthy. Through blood tests my doctors have showed that my K+ supplementation is doing the trick. I'm off to bed, tomorrow I will post another link as promised.
So, you're saying your initial post was correct because you're talking about something other than the posted article about non-patient-specific use of multivitamins? Please respond to something above or start a new thread. Arbitrarily posting unrelated factual statements is obviously lost on the rest of us.
 

eagles22

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Your lack of knowledge is really disappointing especially for a pharmacist. First of all the vast majority of TPN mixtures contain some of the same elements as a Centrum silver tablet. Granted they do differ in overall composition and method of administration. Here is supporting documentation from a credible source http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/CANCER/pedresource/pedres_docs/tpn.pdf Now, if you read my original post in it's entirety, you would notice that I mentioned vitamin and mineral supplements are beneficial for patients who can not get them through their diet. Although this is very basic healthcare and everyone who has commented agrees with statement in one way or another I will also post a link supporting this as well. I never claimed vitamins are beneficial for patients with a proper diet. However, I for one do eat a proper balanced diet, regardless I am potassium deficient and I have been since childhood. I must take K+ supplements in order the stay healthy. Through blood tests my doctors have showed that my K+ supplementation is doing the trick. I'm off to bed, tomorrow I will post another link as promised.
Nurse put a bandaid on me after she took my blood and stopped the bleeding thus proving we should cover everyone head to toe with bandaids to prevent any life threatening bleeds.
 

Ackj

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From that article, the studies were heart disease, cognitive decline, and MI. Hardly all encompassing, and I do not believe the majority of folks take a vitamin to stave off a specific ailment, but rather just for overall health. Overall mortality, quality of life, etc would be better endpoints, but would be nearly impossible to test with any certainty due to the number of confounders you'd dig up. I don't think the supplements ever went out and said "this will reduce your cardiovascular events" so saying they weren't able to achieve that is irrelevant to me. Kind of seems like the ad-hominem fallacy.

How about folks who "just feel better" when they take a vitamin? I'd say that's probably a larger proportion of people who take vitamins than those who hope to prevent an MI. Subjective measures are hard to quantify scientifically, but if you feel more energetic today, does it matter to you that your coronary down the road wasn't prevented, or that you'll start to lose your memory in your 70s? Even if it's just the placebo effect, who cares? People will waste money on all sorts of junk that won't make them healthier, and it's their decision to do so. Chances are they aren't getting the RDIs of many vitamins/minerals in the over-processed diets we eat anyway.
 

sosoo

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the study looks at ppl age 65 and older and runs for 12 years. obviously the vitamins wont be beneficial to ppl in this age group. they are supplements, not miracle pills. they cannot reverse the effects of aging. a child on the other hand would be a different story, n likewise a young person. ppl whose bodily tissues are still in development will of course find benefits.
 

npage148

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a child on the other hand would be a different story, n likewise a young person. ppl whose bodily tissues are still in development will of course find benefits.
Do you have a PhD in BroScience or something?
 

Old Timer

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Your lack of knowledge is really disappointing especially for a pharmacist. First of all the vast majority of TPN mixtures contain some of the same elements as a Centrum silver tablet. Granted they do differ in overall composition and method of administration. Here is supporting documentation from a credible source http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/CANCER/pedresource/pedres_docs/tpn.pdf Now, if you read my original post in it's entirety, you would notice that I mentioned vitamin and mineral supplements are beneficial for patients who can not get them through their diet. Although this is very basic healthcare and everyone who has commented agrees with statement in one way or another I will also post a link supporting this as well. I never claimed vitamins are beneficial for patients with a proper diet. However, I for one do eat a proper balanced diet, regardless I am potassium deficient and I have been since childhood. I must take K+ supplements in order the stay healthy. Through blood tests my doctors have showed that my K+ supplementation is doing the trick. I'm off to bed, tomorrow I will post another link as promised.
Now you have reached the stage where I can say for certain you are a 24 carat sold gold MORON. You conflate things without evidence. Your logic would be eviscerated by a second grader.

First: There is no correlation between TPN and oral multivitamins.
Second: If there was a correlation, which there is not, there is no proof that getting TPN prevents any disease, it's a treatment when oral nutrition is not possible.
Third: There is no study anywhere that shows the benefit of daily multivitamin tablets.

So, stop using TPN in your arguments. STOP, STOP, STOP. Your fall deeper into moronicity with each new post.
 
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YourMD

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I refuse to respond to any nincompoop who attempts to use the made up word "Moronicity" in a sentence. Learn to use language effectively, then we'll talk healthcare.
 

BeLikeBueller

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Any thoughts on women of child bearing age who might stop taking their daily multivitamin a la *folic acid* because of watching some clown on the nightly news saying that people should just completely stop taking vitamins and supplements? Could make for a lot of good counseling opportunities, I suppose.

That's really the only bad thing I could see coming out of this.

As for all the herbal products, well, here's what I have to say to that...




Seriously though - unregulated (excluding USP verified products), largely untested, unproven, and DDIs out the wazoo - why do we even have an herbal section to begin with?
 

StellargalS

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Any thoughts on women of child bearing age who might stop taking their daily multivitamin a la *folic acid* because of watching some clown on the nightly news saying that people should just completely stop taking vitamins and supplements? Could make for a lot of good counseling opportunities, I suppose.

That's really the only bad thing I could see coming out of this.

As for all the herbal products, well, here's what I have to say to that...




Seriously though - unregulated (excluding USP verified products), largely untested, unproven, and DDIs out the wazoo - why do we even have an herbal section to begin with?
Bueller that is an excellent point on the FA. Especially because "less fortunate" may not partake in obstetrical care and overall trust is so misplaced. Neural tube defects! Ugh! So sad. Abandoned and a giant weight on the good old bottom line of the country. Dude you should hit them up for a retraction. I am cereal.

LOL x 10 to the 10th on the herbal products clip. Sometimes I experience residual laughter from your commentary. The UTI iphone thing .... still cracking up.
 
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As was so nicely pointed out by Ackj, a few posts up on this thread, the article in question was examining 3 studies related to heart disease, cognitive decline, and MI. How it has declined into name calling, picture posting and questioning of credentials, is very unprofessional and disheartening for health care providers. This 'heels in dirt' mentality, is counter productive to forum participation. Especially since valid points were made, for and against, the article that initiated the thread.
Don't make me go get the wooden spoon.
 

Old Timer

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I refuse to respond to any nincompoop who attempts to use the made up word "Moronicity" in a sentence. Learn to use language effectively, then we'll talk healthcare.
It's called hyperbole. I know how to use the language, you don't. I always tell my students when confronted with a moron who is being unreasonable, NEVER attempt to use reason. These people do not have the metal capacity to understand reason. So I will give you one last chance to respond in a reasoned fashion and prove to all of us you have more than 5 functioning brain cells.

You made a simple declarative statement about the efficacy of oral multivitamin tablets in positive health outcomes.
Of Course, multivitamins are beneficial to the diet. In todays society of mass production the average individual does not consume the proper amount of whole foods. Thus, It is essentially for us the get these nutrients through alternative sources.
Now prove this. If you cannot prove this than just shut up. There is no medical organization that advocates this position, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics does not advocate your position. In short aside from the supplement industry nobody but you actually believes this. It is not OK to east fast food and take Centrum. Eat the right foods.
 

zelman

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Any thoughts on women of child bearing age who might stop taking their daily multivitamin a la *folic acid* because of watching some clown on the nightly news saying that people should just completely stop taking vitamins and supplements? ...
Unless they specifically avoid "enriched flour" containing products and green leafy vegetables, I don't think their folate level will be low enough to cause neural tube defects.

Again, I do not support "non-patient specific" multivitamin use. If a woman is of child bearing age and either attempting to conceive or not trying to avoid it, their medical providers should make sure their folic acid intake is sufficient (via diet or supplements). This would be a "patient specific" recommendation.
 

StellargalS

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Unless they specifically avoid "enriched flour" containing products and green leafy vegetables, I don't think their folate level will be low enough to cause neural tube defects.

Again, I do not support "non-patient specific" multivitamin use. If a woman is of child bearing age and either attempting to conceive or not trying to avoid it, their medical providers should make sure their folic acid intake is sufficient (via diet or supplements). This would be a "patient specific" recommendation.
Who wants to take that gamble? Not me.
 

VCU07

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Your lack of knowledge is really disappointing especially for a pharmacist. First of all the vast majority of TPN mixtures contain some of the same elements as a Centrum silver tablet. Granted they do differ in overall composition and method of administration. Here is supporting documentation from a credible source http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/CANCER/pedresource/pedres_docs/tpn.pdf Now, if you read my original post in it's entirety, you would notice that I mentioned vitamin and mineral supplements are beneficial for patients who can not get them through their diet. Although this is very basic healthcare and everyone who has commented agrees with statement in one way or another I will also post a link supporting this as well. I never claimed vitamins are beneficial for patients with a proper diet. However, I for one do eat a proper balanced diet, regardless I am potassium deficient and I have been since childhood. I must take K+ supplements in order the stay healthy. Through blood tests my doctors have showed that my K+ supplementation is doing the trick. I'm off to bed, tomorrow I will post another link as promised.
*******. You're trying to find support to argue what you believe are factual points. Problem is, they are not.
 

YourMD

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It's called hyperbole. I know how to use the language, you don't. I always tell my students when confronted with a moron who is being unreasonable, NEVER attempt to use reason. These people do not have the metal capacity to understand reason. So I will give you one last chance to respond in a reasoned fashion and prove to all of us you have more than 5 functioning brain cells.

You made a simple declarative statement about the efficacy of oral multivitamin tablets in positive health outcomes.


Now prove this. If you cannot prove this than just shut up. There is no medical organization that advocates this position, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics does not advocate your position. In short aside from the supplement industry nobody but you actually believes this. It is not OK to east fast food and take Centrum. Eat the right foods.
You have once again proved my point with your previous post. Whatever organization you work for should be embarrassed to employ professors with your type of logic. I don't feel the need to prove anything else. If you want to continue being ignorant that's your problem. The quality of this thread has declined significantly, therefore Consider me unsubbed!!
 

eagles22

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You have once again proved my point with your previous post. Whatever organization you work for should be embarrassed to employ professors with your type of logic. I don't feel the need to prove anything else. If you want to continue being ignorant that's your problem. The quality of this thread has declined significantly, therefore Consider me unsubbed!!
Translation: I'm taking my ball and going home.
 

Old Timer

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You have once again proved my point with your previous post. Whatever organization you work for should be embarrassed to employ professors with your type of logic. I don't feel the need to prove anything else. If you want to continue being ignorant that's your problem. The quality of this thread has declined significantly, therefore Consider me unsubbed!!
As I suspected. You have no proof to backup you assertions. Not surprised at all as proof does not exist. So as we close this thread, there is no clinical benefit for a pharmacist to recommend a multivitamin to an otherwise healthy patient.
 
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Unless a vitamin or supplement is causing harm to a person, who cares?
Are you arguing on behalf of the person's pocketbook? Don't worry. People waste money on scads of junk purchases. Even if all indications for vitamin supplementation were proved false, it's still a better expenditure of money versus some new toy people obsess over.
The idea of obtaining all required vitamins from diet, is lovely. Challenging, even for the most nutritionally minded person.
Are you concerned that patients will discontinue medical care for vitamins? Well if so, the condition will run to it's inevitable conclusion anyway. I also don't worry about people that require warnings on coffee cups, that the contents are hot. Stop trying to protect the foolish from themselves.
Now if LaShanda, her 8 children and various baby daddies are fed exclusively through the drive up window at burger town, few (if any) should reasonably argue against vitamin supplementation (or birth control).
The article discussed the idea of using supplements for prevention/treatment of heart disease and cognitive issues. I've yet to see an advertisement indicating consumption of this vitamin will prevent/treat cardiac disease or cognitive disorders. You never will. Vitamin supplementation is indicative of patient's concern regarding their health. As pharmacists we can educate the hapless patients, that vitamins will not treat/prevent/cure heart disease or dementia.
Remember, Santa's checking his list.
 

xiphoid2010

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I take multivitamin because I cringe at the sight of veggies, so does half of the male population. Maybe they need to look at the demographics.
 

Old Timer

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Unless a vitamin or supplement is causing harm to a person, who cares?
Are you arguing on behalf of the person's pocketbook? Don't worry. People waste money on scads of junk purchases. Even if all indications for vitamin supplementation were proved false, it's still a better expenditure of money versus some new toy people obsess over.
The idea of obtaining all required vitamins from diet, is lovely. Challenging, even for the most nutritionally minded person.
Are you concerned that patients will discontinue medical care for vitamins? Well if so, the condition will run to it's inevitable conclusion anyway. I also don't worry about people that require warnings on coffee cups, that the contents are hot. Stop trying to protect the foolish from themselves.
Now if LaShanda, her 8 children and various baby daddies are fed exclusively through the drive up window at burger town, few (if any) should reasonably argue against vitamin supplementation (or birth control).
The article discussed the idea of using supplements for prevention/treatment of heart disease and cognitive issues. I've yet to see an advertisement indicating consumption of this vitamin will prevent/treat cardiac disease or cognitive disorders. You never will. Vitamin supplementation is indicative of patient's concern regarding their health. As pharmacists we can educate the hapless patients, that vitamins will not treat/prevent/cure heart disease or dementia.
Remember, Santa's checking his list.
First, the USA is not malnourished. Most people are over nourished. Secondly we do not have safety data on the long term use of these agents. The provide NO benefit, may produce side effects and waste money better spent on food.

Next your choice of LaShanda as a name is racist. LaShanda would obviously be black. While never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, more people on welfare ware white than black. Secondly, there is no benefit to LaShanda to take a multiple vitamin. She is probably fat because she is eating too many calories and popping a Centrum or giving her kid some Flintsones will not help either of them. The idea that the American diet is lacking in vitamins is laughable. We all get plenty of vitamins along with all of the calories we eat.

If someone wants to buy multiple vitamins, I don't try to talk them out of it. If they ask, I give them my professional opinion and that is the only people who benefit from multivitamins are the people who sell them. It's my job to tell them to eat a balanced diet and I would refer them to dietician which are available free now at many supermarkets.
 
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Old Timer

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I take multivitamin because I cringe at the sight of veggies, so does half of the male population. Maybe they need to look at the demographics.
I used to as well until I learned how to prepare them. Sending your kid to school to major in Nutrition and Dietetics gives you a whole different perspective on food. Now I can chow down on roasted peppers, squash, eggplant.
 

BeLikeBueller

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I used to as well until I learned how to prepare them. Sending your kid to school to major in Nutrition and Dietetics gives you a whole different perspective on food. Now I can chow down on roasted peppers, squash, eggplant.



I'm just kidding. Good on ya for eating healthy though. I'm trying to do the same myself, although eating well on a student budget can prove difficult at times.

Sadly, a lot of the correlations we have for vitamin and supplement outcomes were epidemiological studies where someone said, "oh! Cultures that eat lots of fish tend to have fewer heart attacks. Fish oil and certain fatty acids must prevent heart attacks." It's common sense that eating right and exercising is going to be the best benefit, but we live in a culture where we'd rather have a quick fix with a pill. Having trouble with weight? Get your doctor to prescribe a stimulant or try the latest diet pill. Exercise and eating right? No thanks! I'd rather just take this magic pill.

And honestly, if folks are choosing alli and the steatorrhea that goes with over cutting back a few cheeseburgers, you know we've got problems.
 
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StellargalS

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I'm just kidding. Good on ya for eating healthy though. I'm trying to do the same myself, although eating well on a student budget can prove difficult at times.

Sadly, a lot of the correlations we have for vitamin and supplement outcomes were epidemiological studies where someone said, "oh! Cultures that eat lots of fish tend to have fewer heart attacks. Fish oil and certain fatty acids must prevent heart attacks." It's common sense that eating right and exercising is going to be the best benefit, but we live in a culture where we'd rather have a quick fix with a pill. Having trouble with weight? Get your doctor to prescribe a stimulant or try the latest diet pill. Exercise and eating right? No thanks! I'd rather just take this magic pill.

And honestly, if folks are choosing alli and the steatorrhea that goes with over cutting back a few cheeseburgers, you know we've got problems.
Steatorrhea! I just threw up a little bit in my mouth.
 
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Old Timer says, "Next your choice of LaShanda as a name is racist. LaShanda would obviously be black. While never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, more people on welfare ware white than black. Secondly, there is no benefit to LaShanda to take a multiple vitamin. She is probably fat because she is eating too many calories and popping a Centrum or giving her kid some Flintsones will not help either of them. The idea that the American diet is lacking in vitamins is laughable. We all get plenty of vitamins along with all of the calories we eat."

How dare you. My sister is named LaShanda. She, as well as my entire family, are white. Why on Earth are you profiling the name LaShanda to be black? Talk about being racist and wrong. Then you assume LaShanda is on Welfare. My example made no statements pertaining to LaShanda's financial health or entitlement. Yet you assume (incorrectly), she is on welfare. More incorrect interpretations to stated fact. Next you state LaShanda is probably fat from eating too many calories. No where in my example is it said LaShanda is fat or consuming excessive calories. Yet again, you mistakenly assess stated information regarding LaShanda.

Wow! Not much you get right. Lots of misinterpretation and incorrect analysis of facts regarding LaShanda. You couldn't correctly make accurate statements about a simple example using LaShanda. Yet you expect people to entertain your views on the complex use analysis benefits for people using vitamins. Not in this lifetime.
 

Old Timer

10+ Year Member
May 16, 2007
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Good on ya for eating healthy though. I'm trying to do the same myself, although eating well on a student budget can prove difficult at times.
Not really, you just have to work at it. There are places that sell fresh vegies

Sadly, a lot of the correlations we have for vitamin and supplement outcomes were epidemiological studies where someone said, "oh! Cultures that eat lots of fish tend to have fewer heart attacks. Fish oil and certain fatty acids must prevent heart attacks." It's common sense that eating right and exercising is going to be the best benefit, but we live in a culture where we'd rather have a quick fix with a pill. Having trouble with weight? Get your doctor to prescribe a stimulant or try the latest diet pill. Exercise and eating right? No thanks! I'd rather just take this magic pill.

And honestly, if folks are choosing alli and the steatorrhea that goes with over cutting back a few cheeseburgers, you know we've got problems.
Sadly, there is NO PROOF that taking these items in supplement form is beneficial. In fact Fish oil capsules have been a huge giant zero in the health dept. It's eating fish that's healthy, not taking fish oil capsules....
 

Old Timer

10+ Year Member
May 16, 2007
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Old Timer says, "Next your choice of LaShanda as a name is racist. LaShanda would obviously be black. While never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, more people on welfare ware white than black. Secondly, there is no benefit to LaShanda to take a multiple vitamin. She is probably fat because she is eating too many calories and popping a Centrum or giving her kid some Flintsones will not help either of them. The idea that the American diet is lacking in vitamins is laughable. We all get plenty of vitamins along with all of the calories we eat."

How dare you. My sister is named LaShanda. She, as well as my entire family, are white. Why on Earth are you profiling the name LaShanda to be black? Talk about being racist and wrong. Then you assume LaShanda is on Welfare. My example made no statements pertaining to LaShanda's financial health or entitlement. Yet you assume (incorrectly), she is on welfare. More incorrect interpretations to stated fact. Next you state LaShanda is probably fat from eating too many calories. No where in my example is it said LaShanda is fat or consuming excessive calories. Yet again, you mistakenly assess stated information regarding LaShanda.

Wow! Not much you get right. Lots of misinterpretation and incorrect analysis of facts regarding LaShanda. You couldn't correctly make accurate statements about a simple example using LaShanda. Yet you expect people to entertain your views on the complex use analysis benefits for people using vitamins. Not in this lifetime.
With multiple baby daddies.... sure.......
 

radio frequency

5+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2012
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Old Timer says, "Next your choice of LaShanda as a name is racist. LaShanda would obviously be black. While never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, more people on welfare ware white than black. Secondly, there is no benefit to LaShanda to take a multiple vitamin. She is probably fat because she is eating too many calories and popping a Centrum or giving her kid some Flintsones will not help either of them. The idea that the American diet is lacking in vitamins is laughable. We all get plenty of vitamins along with all of the calories we eat."

How dare you. My sister is named LaShanda. She, as well as my entire family, are white. Why on Earth are you profiling the name LaShanda to be black? Talk about being racist and wrong. Then you assume LaShanda is on Welfare. My example made no statements pertaining to LaShanda's financial health or entitlement. Yet you assume (incorrectly), she is on welfare. More incorrect interpretations to stated fact. Next you state LaShanda is probably fat from eating too many calories. No where in my example is it said LaShanda is fat or consuming excessive calories. Yet again, you mistakenly assess stated information regarding LaShanda.

Wow! Not much you get right. Lots of misinterpretation and incorrect analysis of facts regarding LaShanda. You couldn't correctly make accurate statements about a simple example using LaShanda. Yet you expect people to entertain your views on the complex use analysis benefits for people using vitamins. Not in this lifetime.
Somebody profiling a hypothetical patient as having "multiple baby daddies", "eating exclusively from the drive-up window at Burger Town" and having "8 children" is probably not describing somebody in the upper class. Or even the middle class. Hence, the welfare assumption.

Who do you know who eats exclusively from drive up windows who is not overweight? Moreover, who do you (actually) know whose name begins with La- that isn't African American, Mormon, or over 75? I have a hard time believing you'd actually paint a profile of your "sister" in this manner unless you really didn't like her...or were just plain racist.
 
Apr 17, 2013
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Arguing over the intentions of an hypothetical example, with the person that created it? Really? Wow! People should really look to you for interpretations of nothing.
Let's line by line, again.

Old Timer says, "With multiple baby daddies.... sure......."

No where in my explanation, for using the name LaShanda, did I say that the rest of the person's profile was based on fact. I created the example of LaShanda (real name) with a fictitious # of children and baby daddies for the balance of the example. Again an incorrect statement, based on incorrect analysis of case presented. You are wrong. Accept it. Stop defending your mistake.

Radio frequency says,
"Somebody profiling a hypothetical patient as having "multiple baby daddies", "eating exclusively from the drive-up window at Burger Town" and having "8 children" is probably not describing somebody in the upper class. Or even the middle class. Hence, the welfare assumption.

Who do you know who eats exclusively from drive up windows who is not overweight? Moreover, who do you (actually) know whose name begins with La- that isn't African American, Mormon, or over 75? I have a hard time believing you'd actually paint a profile of your "sister" in this manner unless you really didn't like her...or were just plain racist."

So a patient with 8 children and multiple baby daddies, purchasing food from burger town, can't be from the upper or middle classes? Must be on welfare? Oh heavens, are you serious? The police can't profile people yet you should be allowed to.
So according to your statement, everyone is either upper class, middle class or welfare? You say probably. I say, WRONG. Then you go on to declare, that people who eat at drive up windows are overweight. Really. Please, I know many people that are financially distressed, and that eat from the 99cent value meals offered at most drive up restaurants. They can barely afford one burger and believe me they are rail thin. You are making broad generalizations, and assuming you are correct. Your not.
I used my actual sister's name, LaShanda. She is real and I love her. Again making incorrect statements about information presented. How on Earth can you possibly question or entertain the idea you are correct about me using my sister's name, in an hypothetical example I CREATED. It's incomprehensible. It's my example, and only my explanation of it is correct. How can you reasonably argue with the intentions of the person that created the example and possibly think you're correct. You're both wrong! Most alarming is your making statements, based upon your incorrect analysis of the example, then trying to defend your erroneous interpretations. SCAREY!!! I would question any statements, either of you make, in analysis of anything. Clearly you are wrong about mine. It begs the question how many other things are you wrong about? If the prescription is for penicillin, the doctor wants you to dispense penicillin. Not what you think it should be. Get it. Real simple.
LaShanda (my loving, white sister, unmarried and mother of zero children)), her 8 children (fictitious representation for example), and various baby daddies (yet another fictitious representation for example).
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
15+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2003
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Born: Parkersburg, WV | Now: Montgomery TWP, PA
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Old Timer says, "Next your choice of LaShanda as a name is racist. LaShanda would obviously be black. While never letting the facts get in the way of a good story, more people on welfare ware white than black. Secondly, there is no benefit to LaShanda to take a multiple vitamin. She is probably fat because she is eating too many calories and popping a Centrum or giving her kid some Flintsones will not help either of them. The idea that the American diet is lacking in vitamins is laughable. We all get plenty of vitamins along with all of the calories we eat."

How dare you. My sister is named LaShanda. She, as well as my entire family, are white. Why on Earth are you profiling the name LaShanda to be black? Talk about being racist and wrong.
You used your own sister as an example of an idiot that eats Burger Shack every day with her 8 kids?

That's sort of dickish. "Lets say there is a Nazi using slave labor at Auschwitz. We'll ca'll him Fred. My grandpa is named Fred."


Also, vitamins are a waste of time and money for a typical person consuming a balanced diet or something close to it.

[/quote]
 
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Apr 17, 2013
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Well yet another member of the senseless squad registers their confident ignorance. I used my sister's name LaShanda, as the reference identity, in a fictitious example. How on Earth you twisted that into Nazis and slave labor in Auschwitz, is really Freudian. No where in my example, using the name LaShanda, was it stated that she was an 'example of an idiot'. Can't you see that you are reading your ignorant stereotypes into the facts of the example? You are introducing, your ideas (incorrectly), onto the example. Another dangerous example of people misreading something, and declaring facts.
Then you bring it home with:
"vitamins are a waste of time and money for a typical person consuming a balanced diet or something close to it."
How much time are you estimating it takes to swallow a vitamin? One or two seconds.
How expensive are vitamins where you live? #365 Centrum are $19.95. That equals 0.05cents per day. Do you think that's going to break the bank of most American households.
Please share what parameters you are using to define the 'typical' person and 'something close to it'. Those are broad sweeping generalizations, based on your limited knowledge and experience. Try using that argument in a court room. The old "I feel' versus 'the facts' defense. Your statements are based in your ignorance and a dangerous overconfidence of your beliefs, not facts.

Learn to read what is stated. Not what you think is being stated.
We don't call my sister LaShanda, by her full name. We call her Shanda, for short. One can only imagine what mental corruption you must suffer from, to think so little of such a beautiful name. Sad.