Mar 22, 2010
1
0
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
Hey Everyone, I need some advice.

Here's my situation:

I am 26 years old, and I have a family. After high school, I spent six years in the US Navy. Now, as I am nearing completion of my BS, I am eager to begin planning further education in Optometry.

However, due to the small number of Optometry schools, pushing forth would involve moving my family and coordinating my husband's simultaneous career move. As supportive as he is of my pursuit of optometry, he won't immediately be ready to move when I am done with my BS.

Would waiting a few years after finishing my BS negatively impact my prospects of entering Optometry school? Or perhaps a better question is: How long is it 'safe' to wait to apply, after finishing school?

If I were to apply, interview, and be accepted-- is that approval only good for the upcoming term? Should I do it, just to have the assurance that I am a good candidate, even if I need to redo it later? Or is that not worth my time/money? Or perhaps would that somehow reflect poorly on my candidacy?

I really am trying to be as flexible as possible for my family. However, if I determine that it is truly NOT in my best interest to delay immediate pursuit of optometry school, my husband will understand. It will basically translate to an enormous pay cut.

Thank you Everyone, in advance.

Cheers!
:D
 

NorthernStar13

OSU c/o 2014
Feb 8, 2010
19
0
0
Status
Optometry Student
Between all the supplemental fees, airplane tickets, and "save my spot" fees, you can easily spend thousands on the application process; wait to apply until you are ready!

Also, schools only allow you to fulfill their pre-req requirements within a certain amount of years. Check with schools that are of particular interest to you. It would be best to enter optometry school as soon as you graduate, however several people take a year off as well.
 
Jul 30, 2009
115
1
41
Status
Optometry Student
Waiting a few years wouldn't hurt, but you might be asked why didn't you apply during your undergrad years during interview. And you will probably need to retake OAT if you wait for too long. I believe the acceptance is only good for the incoming year, and most schools keep a record of your application history, and are likely to ask you why did you re-apply during interview or in essay form. So I wouldn't recommend you to apply if you are not planning to attend to the school the coming year.
 
Oct 1, 2009
54
0
0
Status
Pre-Optometry
Is there a school near where you are now? If there is, then maybe apply to just that one first and see if you get in.
 

zyg0te

10+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2007
310
23
251
Status
Optometrist
Waiting a few years wouldn't hurt, but you might be asked why didn't you apply during your undergrad years during interview. And you will probably need to retake OAT if you wait for too long. I believe the acceptance is only good for the incoming year, and most schools keep a record of your application history, and are likely to ask you why did you re-apply during interview or in essay form. So I wouldn't recommend you to apply if you are not planning to attend to the school the coming year.
I think schools allow you to to defer acceptance for the following year, but check on the schools you're interested in.

Also, consider the monetary aspects of waiting a few years. That's a few years of salary you're losing as well as a few years of increased tuition.
 

Absolute Vision

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 1, 2008
140
0
141
California
Status
Optometrist
I don't think it would be a problem waiting a couple of years after you've obtained you undergrad degree to apply. Most schools will accept your undergrad transcripts up to 10 yrs. I wouldn't apply to any school unless I was planning to attend. For me, I was career changer, and my undergrad transcripts were older than 10 yrs, so I could only apply to certain optometry schools. I didn't want to take over my pre-reqs. Like the previous posters, all you have to do is take the OAT. Fortunately, I was able to attend a school not too far from my spouse's practice/office. If you decide to take the leap forward and apply, be sure to talk it over with your spouse and make sure you both understand each others needs. IF you have children, then you're going to have to develop daily routines that will work for you. You will have to develop more efficient study skills than your classmates who don't have families. As you may or may not know, optometry school will be fast paced and challenging, but it is possible to balance school life and family life with good time management skills. Good luck.