eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
Hi,

I have to retake part 3. I was able to finish everything on time and performed every skill very well. My score report showed I did well in every skill like in 80s and 90s percent. However my scale scores for psychomotor skill and clinical observation are low. I verbalize everything and scored high in communication.
Please I need help, any tips? What am I doing wrong?
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
I'm open to any suggestions. Any input is appreciated. Has anyone been in this position before?
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
They just gave me vague answers like you need 300 to pass and what each category means. However they don't pinpoint exactly why I didn't pass. I guess they want me to figure it out on my own.....
 
Jun 7, 2019
6
0
Status
Optometry Student
I am exactly in the same situation. I thought about appealing my score, but that costs too.. I don’t know what to do at this point either. There is another forum someone just posted yesterday.
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
I think it would be a waste to appeal my score because I feel they will not do anything about it. I registered again instead.
For those who passed, how did you report findings exactly? I'm doing it the way I was taught in school and i have peers who I practiced with, doing/saying the same thing and have passed. Does NBEO strictly focuses on an individual's performance or do they compare other candidates' performances and make pass/fail decision based on that?
 
Jun 7, 2019
6
0
Status
Optometry Student
I think BIO is heavily weighted so if you forget to say what you see, that takes a huge chunk out of your score..
 

Dani91

5+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2015
66
6
Status
Pre-Optometry
I got full points on BIO and still got a low psychomotor score so I don't even know if that's the case. I really don't understand where I need to make changes
 
Jun 7, 2019
6
0
Status
Optometry Student
That’s strange.. I mean this whole process is so bizarre.. I’m so done with it.
 

Dani91

5+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2015
66
6
Status
Pre-Optometry
That’s strange.. I mean this whole process is so bizarre.. I’m so done with it.
Yeah..I legitimately do not understand my score report. Even for 78/90D and refraction etc I basically got full points. So everything where you're supposed to be communicating it's not like my scores were decreased.
 

Purkinja

2+ Year Member
Sep 21, 2017
107
53
Status
Optometrist
Raw passing scores vary per form of the test as each test is also graded internally to difficulty via common items across all forms of the test.Their is no effort to pass/fail a certain % only to measure minimum required competency to practice
 

AcademicEyes

2+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2016
171
59
Status
Optometrist
From NBEO:
“WHAT DOES EACH DISCIPLINE MEAN?
Communication Skills: providing and obtaining information in a clear and concise manner to include avoiding medical jargon and thereby providing information the patient needs to understand their condition and the procedures being performed.
Affective Skills: interacting with the SP in an organized, professional, and empathetic demeanor.
Psychomotor Skills: performing the physical tasks of the various skills in a proficient and efficient manner.
Clinical Observation & Reporting Skills: accurately reporting your obtained findings.”

If you scored low in the last two, perhaps something about the way you performed certain skills was wrong? And perhaps you communicated well, but your findings were inaccurate, thus bringing your clinical observation skill down.
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
But it doesn't make sense that one gets full points in a skill and score low in psychomotor skills
 

AcademicEyes

2+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2016
171
59
Status
Optometrist
I certainly scored full points on some sections (not all) and psychomotor was my lowest section as well. I assumed it was brought down by the sections I didn’t score as highly in.
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
Any luck from anyone who retook it?

If anyone passed part 3, please share how you were successful. Like did you follow a script? How did you report findings the way they want? How were you able to score in psychomotor skills? For BIO, did you actually went in the far periphery and how did you report findings when doing station 4? (*I know how to do all of these things btw, I just want to compare to what I'm doing). I executed all the skills pretty well but perhaps they did not get a view even though I was seeing it clearly.

Also can anyone share their experience with the new slit lamp?
 
Feb 7, 2020
2
0
Status
Optometry Student
I saw your post about Part 3 from a while back. I just learned my NBEO Part 3 score and I didn't make it either. I, too, practiced long and hard and I followed a script. I completed my skills well but I scored poorly on psychomotor skills and clinical observation for some reason. I did not score well on BIO, slit lamp, and CVF. If you have any tips on what ultimately worked for you, I'd be very grateful.
 

E_wen

2+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2015
34
3
I took part 3 in September 2019 and had to retake, so I took it and passed on my second attempt in January 2020. I believe it comes down to three key components:
1. Skills
Practice as much as you can. Make sure you practice as if you were taking the actual exam every single time. Even practice pressing the online timer each time. Follow the rubric and read all the candidate guides and online tutorials. We all know how to do the skills, but can you do them exactly as the rubric says? If you can practice in a NBEO room at an optometry school, that's even better. Try to go over each station at least 3 times, each time as polished as if you were to do it that way on the actual boards exam. Record yourself practicing (on voice) so you know how much time is left, and then you can re-listen to each attempt to see if you hit every point on the rubric.

2. Script
Know your script inside and out. Perfect your script. Double- and triple-check your script. Add to it and change it every time you practice and realize how it could be improved, or when your classmate points out how you could improve something. Record a version of your script including all stations and listen to it on long drives, flying and when you have free time. The more you do this, the more resilient you are to setbacks that will happen on the day of your boards part 3. Since you cannot control much in terms of patients, environment, or equipment, the script and your skills are one thing you can control in terms of how well you know it inside out.

3. Psychology
It's understandable to feel utterly defeated when you discover that you failed part 3. After all, we all know these skills because we've all passed multiple proficiencies and done these skills countless times on real patients. Once you get over the sadness and self-pity, realize that this is just a hoop we all have to jump through in order to become qualified eye doctors. You wouldn't want a dentist working on your teeth if he never passed his boards exams, right? As much as it may feel like we failed because of bad luck, you have to let go of that mindset and focus on doing 100% of the things you can in order to maximize your chances at passing.
Mentally, it is important to know that you have everything within you to pass this exam. It will not come without hard work. Once you've put in all that work, BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. You will know when you have done everything you can to prepare. Trust all your years of hard work and perseverance. You are so close to the finish line, and you will emerge on the other side an amazing doctor after recovering from these obstacles.
I personally had one of my patients in my fourth-year vision therapy clinic hypnotize me, as crazy as that sounds. I was willing to try anything to overcome my self-doubt after failing the first time. She painted me a beautiful picture of my future as an incredible eye doctor, after I passed my boards and achieved all my goals. Sometimes when you have to bridge the gap between lack of experience and confidence, you do have to "fake it until you make it". You have to believe that you can do it, and act like it. Do whatever it takes for you to gain that confidence in yourself. Write a list of your accomplishments, remind yourself that you've made it this far, and know that you will still be a great eye doctor even if you failed a boards exam.

Some people can get lucky and pass the first go, without doing all of these precise steps. If this is your first time, are you willing to risk precious time (months of practicing and 2 months to find out your result) and over $1.5k on luck? Do everything you can in your power, and there will be a very slim chance that you will fail. I thought I prepared as hard as I could the first time, but I was wrong. You can never over-prepare for this exam, and the more you know your script inside and out, the less prone you are to being affected by any little thing that goes wrong. And there will be things that go wrong, so help yourself the best you can to prepare for it.
 
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eye.believe

5+ Year Member
Jan 28, 2014
38
0
Do you have to finish every skill to pass? Or is there some leg room if you don't complete a skill in time?
 

E_wen

2+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2015
34
3
No you don't have to finish every skill to pass. Although it certainly helps. For heavily weighted items like BIO and slit lamp, you should definitely try to finish and do it well. Some people didn't do any contact lenses and still (allegedly) passed.
When I passed on my second try, I finished with 3-10 minutes to spare in each station. It would be in your best interest to get to that comfort level by the time you take it again.
 
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