BigBear123

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I'm just wondering what the chance is that I'll receive need-based financial aid. I've gotten into some schools that I really like but they're privates and some of the most expensive schools in country. I haven't gotten into any state (public) schools. My parents are in the ~$150k (maybe a little over) income bracket, but I still have a sibling in college. They live in an area with a high cost of living and have many expenses including a mortgage and they will not able to support me at all in med school. The budget for the schools I've been accepted to exceeds $70k/year. I want to do primary care (esp FM), but I feel like I'll be in debt for the rest of my life!
 

darkjedi

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It will be extremely variable depending on the school. Some schools with larger endowments will be capable of handing out more merit and need based aid to their students. That said, the 150,000$ income bracket is firmly in the middle class (if not upper-middle), and you may be competing with students who's parents earn significantly less.
 

darklabel

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It will be extremely variable depending on the school. Some schools with larger endowments will be capable of handing out more merit and need based aid to their students. That said, the 150,000$ income bracket is firmly in the middle class (if not upper-middle), and you may be competing with students who's parents earn significantly less.
You should define "financial aid".

If you mean grants then most likely no, those are notoriously difficult in medical school and usually based on merit.

If you mean loans to cover medical school than you should be fine. I believe after a certain age you can apply as an independent person and you have Strafford until around 220k (this includes any loans you took out in undergrad) and GradPlus should fill in the rest.

Here is some invaluable information:

https://www.aamc.org/services/first/first_factsheets/183294/afford_med_school.html
 

gyngyn

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Primary care loan forgiveness programs are abundant at both the federal and state level (at least in CA). A need based grant with your parent's income is not likely at all.
 
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Doctor Strange

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My parents make $70k and both of my younger siblings are in college. Get in line.

From my personal experience and from talking to financial aid offices, it seems that need-based aid (grants in particular) vary widely from school to school. I think most schools do offer some modest grants for needy students, though. Your parents' income would bar you from most of these, however.
 
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MedPR

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Your parents are in the $150k bracket and you think you qualify for need based aid? Lol talk about privilege and entitlement.


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Yorick

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Your parents are in the $150k bracket and you think you qualify for need based aid? Lol talk about privilege and entitlement.


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Why are you hounding him/her? While that income is more and much more than what many families make, it's not that different when you're talking about college expenses, much less for medical school expenses. My parents make a bit more but we live modestly and they could only send me off to college on largely merit money and maybe taking on a small loan in the future. You think parent's in the $150k area bracket can comfortably afford to pay $50,000-70,000 a year for medical school? Think again. Especially when you consider, as bigbear123 said, cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings etc. My family, as I'm sure others with similar income, would GLADLY take reasonable grants from schools.
 

darkjedi

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Why are you hounding him/her? While that income is more and much more than what many families make, it's not that different when you're talking about college expenses, much less for medical school expenses. My parents make a bit more but we live modestly and they could only send me off to college on largely merit money and maybe taking on a small loan in the future. You think parent's in the $150k area bracket can comfortably afford to pay $50,000-70,000 a year for medical school? Think again. Especially when you consider, as bigbear123 said, cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings etc. My family, as I'm sure others with similar income, would GLADLY take reasonable grants from schools.
That's perfectly fair and a reasonable point to make, however I also think it's critical to keep in mind that at that income level, a family making ~150k is more affluent than ~95% of the population. While medical school students are certainly skewed towards the more affluent, there are still many many underprivileged students who could use the money more. Need-based aid is already scarce enough as is, it might as well go to those who most desperately need it.

Unfortunately this means the middle class gets shafted as far as financial aid goes, but life could be worse.
 
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IlDestriero

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Expect none, unless your a total bad as$ and they're trying to get you to come there instead of one of the top schools, who have plenty of merit based money to hands out as well btw. But even at the enormously endowed ivory towers, a family income over $150k isn't going to get you very far.
Your best bet at a "free" ride is the military. I'm guessing that forgiveness programs, etc will decline in the future as the medical reimbursement pie contracts.
 

EarthtoneJon

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OP,

As an adult child, your parents' $150,000+ income (depending on your level of financial independence and their willingness to contribute) may be completely worthless to you. You may not see a dime of it in medical school. On your FAFSA, you do not have to provide any information about your parents. I would suggest taking advantage of this, because $150,000 (even with a sibling in college) is a hell of a lot more than other applicants can claim. For example, my parents make a combined salary of less than $50,000. My mom is in college, my younger brother is in college, and I will be starting medical school in the fall. I consider myself an extremely lucky guy because I have everything I need, but let's face it, my family has NO money. And just think- there are so many others like me who are starting medical school this year, and some with even less money. If you're over 18 years of age, you are not legally obligated to provide information about your parents' income-- don't!
 
Feb 23, 2011
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Why are you hounding him/her? While that income is more and much more than what many families make, it's not that different when you're talking about college expenses, much less for medical school expenses. My parents make a bit more but we live modestly and they could only send me off to college on largely merit money and maybe taking on a small loan in the future. You think parent's in the $150k area bracket can comfortably afford to pay $50,000-70,000 a year for medical school? Think again. Especially when you consider, as bigbear123 said, cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings etc. My family, as I'm sure others with similar income, would GLADLY take reasonable grants from schools.
Because the person whose family only makes $40,000 also has cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings, etc, but much less room for discretionary funds.

I'm also curious as to your definition of "living modestly". Living more modestly than some doesn't make you poor.
 

Yorick

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darkjedi said:
Unfortunately this means the middle class gets shafted as far as financial aid goes, but life could be worse.
Indeed, usually the very rich or the dirt poor don't need to worry so much about finances, but even the poor get hit with loans in full or near full aid packages.


Because the person whose family only makes $40,000 also has cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings, etc, but much less room for discretionary funds.

I'm also curious as to your definition of "living modestly". Living more modestly than some doesn't make you poor.
Sure but $150k isn't "privileged and entitled" although it's true everyone has their own definition and view of such terms like middle class. By 'modestly' I mean my family doesn't really take vacations, having a decent, simple home, and eating at home nearly all the time and I made my personal savings through working all throughout high school and none from my parents. But like I said, everyone will have their own definition.
 

MedPR

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Why are you hounding him/her? While that income is more and much more than what many families make, it's not that different when you're talking about college expenses, much less for medical school expenses. My parents make a bit more but we live modestly and they could only send me off to college on largely merit money and maybe taking on a small loan in the future. You think parent's in the $150k area bracket can comfortably afford to pay $50,000-70,000 a year for medical school? Think again. Especially when you consider, as bigbear123 said, cost of living for the family, income tax, mortgage payments, siblings etc. My family, as I'm sure others with similar income, would GLADLY take reasonable grants from schools.
The point is not what $150k can buy or pay for. It's how much more $150k can pay for compared to the majority of people who make much less. Again, privilege and entitlement.

The fact that you even consider living comfortably and trying to pay out of pocket for med school in the same sentence is enough to show how ignorant you are about money.

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Sure but $150k isn't "privileged and entitled" although it's true everyone has their own definition and view of such terms like middle class. By 'modestly' I mean my family doesn't really take vacations, having a decent, simple home, and eating at home nearly all the time and I made my personal savings through working all throughout high school and none from my parents. But like I said, everyone will have their own definition.
$150k is top 5% and priveleged. You have more than 95% of the country! I'm not saying its an excessive amount of money, but with that much, you have choices about where your money is spent. If the choice is to spend the money on a large house and nice cars, or private school, or vacations, it's all still a choice. Sure, you may not be able to afford all of them, but you can afford some of them.

You don't get that the people who make much less don't have those choices. They don't get large houses, private school, college tuition OR vacations.
 

MedPR

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Indeed, usually the very rich or the dirt poor don't need to worry so much about finances, but even the poor get hit with loans in full or near full aid packages.




Sure but $150k isn't "privileged and entitled" although it's true everyone has their own definition and view of such terms like middle class. By 'modestly' I mean my family doesn't really take vacations, having a decent, simple home, and eating at home nearly all the time and I made my personal savings through working all throughout high school and none from my parents. But like I said, everyone will have their own definition.
You think a $150k+ HH income isn't privileged? Bro that's higher than 90%+ of households in the US. The entitlement stems from personality due to privilege and misunderstanding how much money you are privileged with.

Most families don't vacation, eat at home regularly, and still live paycheck to paycheck barely being able to save anything. That's the reality of most middle class people.

Your family simply chooses that lifestyle. There's a difference.
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Actually, unless someone's parents are very affluent $300k+, or the person is an only child, it's not likely that families in the $100k-200k range are paying anything towards med school. Many have the "we'll pay for undergrad" policy and many can't even do that.

If you have 10 med students whose parents are earning between $40k-200k and none of the parents are contributing towards med school, then it could be argued that they all either need the same aid or that they all can afford the same loans. Once they're all earning doctors' salaries, why should the new doctors with $150k parents have HUGE loans, while those with $50k parents have little or no loans?
 
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It would be nice if they gave financial aid according to how much school debt you've already incurred.... If parents aren't helping you pay for your education, there income really shouldn't be considered at all.
 

MedPR

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You think parent's in the $150k area bracket can comfortably afford to pay $50,000-70,000 a year for medical school? Think again. .
Btw, this sentence is particularly interesting. You're essentially saying that since your $150k+ HH income can't comfortably afford to pay for medical school that you deserve need-based aid. So for the first time in your life mommy and daddy can't comfortably afford to give you what you want. I guess that means you are needy now.
 

MedPR

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It would be nice if they gave financial aid according to how much school debt you've already incurred.... If parents aren't helping you pay for your education, there income really shouldn't be considered at all.
As someone who went to a private undergrad mainly on scholarship and no aid from parents I would like this. However, it was my decision not to go to state school for free. I shouldn't be entitled to more aid just because I made a (dumb) decision to put myself in unnecessary debt.
 

MedPR

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OP,

As an adult child, your parents' $150,000+ income (depending on your level of financial independence and their willingness to contribute) may be completely worthless to you. You may not see a dime of it in medical school. On your FAFSA, you do not have to provide any information about your parents. I would suggest taking advantage of this, because $150,000 (even with a sibling in college) is a hell of a lot more than other applicants can claim. For example, my parents make a combined salary of less than $50,000. My mom is in college, my younger brother is in college, and I will be starting medical school in the fall. I consider myself an extremely lucky guy because I have everything I need, but let's face it, my family has NO money. And just think- there are so many others like me who are starting medical school this year, and some with even less money. If you're over 18 years of age, you are not legally obligated to provide information about your parents' income-- don't!
Your parents' income doesn't matter on FAFSA. All medical school students are independents. And you are obligated to input your parents' income if you are going to try and get anything out of your school.
 

darkjedi

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If you have 10 med students whose parents are earning between $40k-200k and none of the parents are contributing towards med school, then it could be argued that they all either need the same aid or that they all can afford the same loans. Once they're all earning doctors' salaries, why should the new doctors with $150k parents have HUGE loans, while those with $50k parents have little or no loans?
I'm sorry, but I have a very difficult time believing that reasoning. I don't see how you can justify giving equal amounts of money to a family earning 150k who is used to living in a two story 3 bedroom house in an area with good school districts over a family earning 40k who lives in single bedroom apartment an underserved neighborhood and troubled schools.

I'm not saying that is every family who earns 150k or every family who earns 40k, but cases such as these will inevitably happen. The degree to which a family earning 150k a year is 'unable' to contribute to their child's education is vastly different than a family earning 40k a year being 'unable' to contribute to their child's education.

As other posters have mentioned, those who have been raised in a middle to upper class family, while may feel like they are living life modestly, do not truly understand what it means to be from a lower-income family.
 

MedPR

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Actually, unless someone's parents are very affluent $300k+, or the person is an only child, it's not likely that families in the $100k-200k range are paying anything towards med school. Many have the "we'll pay for undergrad" policy and many can't even do that.

If you have 10 med students whose parents are earning between $40k-200k and none of the parents are contributing towards med school, then it could be argued that they all either need the same aid or that they all can afford the same loans. Once they're all earning doctors' salaries, why should the new doctors with $150k parents have HUGE loans, while those with $50k parents have little or no loans?

Except for the part where a $40k HH income and a $200k HH income aren't contributing to medical education for vastly different reasons.

There is no argument for treating those two households the same. It is not anyone's responsibility to cover for cheap parents (the parents who choose not to contribute) at the expense of the kid(s) with the middle/lower-middle class (the parents who cannot contribute) parents.
 

sazerac

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I'm just wondering what the chance is that I'll receive need-based financial aid. I've gotten into some schools that I really like but they're privates and some of the most expensive schools in country. I haven't gotten into any state (public) schools. My parents are in the ~$150k (maybe a little over) income bracket, but I still have a sibling in college. They live in an area with a high cost of living and have many expenses including a mortgage and they will not able to support me at all in med school. The budget for the schools I've been accepted to exceeds $70k/year. I want to do primary care (esp FM), but I feel like I'll be in debt for the rest of my life!
The scholarship process is even more mysterious than the application process. While it would be difficult to assign a "chance" of getting need-based grants, there are students whose parents make more than $150K who qualified for need based grants. Hell there are medical students who made more than $150K and qualify for need-based grants. Anything can happen, and none of it makes much sense.

Keep in mind that schools have many named, endowed scholarships set up by private parties, and each scholarship has its own rules, qualifications, and definition of "need".
 
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I'm sorry, but I have a very difficult time believing that reasoning. I don't see how you can justify giving equal amounts of money to a family earning 150k who is used to living in a two story 3 bedroom house in an area with good school districts over a family earning 40k who lives in single bedroom apartment an underserved neighborhood and troubled schools.

I'm not saying that is every family who earns 150k or every family who earns 40k, but cases such as these will inevitably happen. The degree to which a family earning 150k a year is 'unable' to contribute to their child's education is vastly different than a family earning 40k a year being 'unable' to contribute to their child's education.

As other posters have mentioned, those who have been raised in a middle to upper class family, while may feel like they are living life modestly, do not truly understand what it means to be from a lower-income family.
You wouldn't be giving equal amounts to the FAMILY it would be to the individual. My family is hovering close to the $100k mark (partly due to the fact that we keep pulling from savings), but I'm not going to see a penny for Medical school, housing, clothing, food, etc.... You can't make broad statements about what a family can and can't afford based on a number. My dad is an unemployed electrician the majority of the year, so we pay for a second household (a trailer) as he travels all over the country finding jobs where he can. I really don't understand your reasoning. If I have the same amount of undergrad debt as a student whose family makes $40k, I should receive the same amount of financial aid. Both students would be receiving nothing from their family.
 

MedPR

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You wouldn't be giving equal amounts to the FAMILY it would be to the individual. My family is hovering close to the $100k mark (partly due to the fact that we keep pulling from savings), but I'm not going to see a penny for Medical school, housing, clothing, food, etc.... You can't make broad statements about what a family can and can't afford based on a number. My dad is an unemployed electrician the majority of the year, so we pay for a second household (a trailer) as he travels all over the country finding jobs where he can. I really don't understand your reasoning. If I have the same amount of undergrad debt as a student whose family makes $40k, I should receive the same amount of financial aid. Both students would be receiving nothing from their family.
Why should you receive the same amount of financial aid as someone just because you have the same amount of undergrad debt? That doesn't make any sense.
 

darkjedi

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My family is hovering close to the $100k mark (partly due to the fact that we keep pulling from savings)
I'm not sure I understand this part, income is income, regardless of equity. Even if you draw down equity that is not considered income.
 

MedPR

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Oh and PS, the family who makes $40k isn't going to have the money to send one of the breadwinners around the country searching for jobs.
 
Aug 11, 2012
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Why should you receive the same amount of financial aid as someone just because you have the same amount of undergrad debt? That doesn't make any sense.
Because if they had more undergrad debt (or school debt in general) due to their family situation, the individual would obviously need the money more. I meant it as a conditional statement.
 
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I'm not sure I understand this part, income is income, regardless of equity. Even if you draw down equity that is not considered income.
could be retirement savings... if you take from a tax deferred account, its income
 
Aug 11, 2012
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Oh and PS, the family who makes $40k isn't going to have the money to send one of the breadwinners around the country searching for jobs.
This only works BECAUSE my Dad makes more money going around the country looking for jobs than was spent in order for him to do so. It's not like we send him on a vacation. Also my Mom's the breadwinner. Either way-- it doesn't take away from the fact that when it comes to family contribution, I'm still getting nothing from my family.
 

MedPR

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Because if they had more undergrad debt (or school debt in general) due to their family situation, the individual would obviously need the money more. I meant it as a conditional statement.
But you don't know that the amount of undergrad debt is due to family situation. Maybe the family was once really poor, but suddenly became wealthy and decided it's better to spend money on houses/cars/vacations than it is on repaying student loans.

You are telling us not to make generalizations, yet you are making generalizations of your own. Can't have your cake and eat it too.
 

DrCaliBoy

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Wow, I am really surprised that people are actually arguing that students whose family income is 150k should get the same NEED based aid as students whose families are making <40k. So the prior student has been most likely living a wealthier life style than the latter his/her whole life but suddenly its not fair that the wealthier student would have accrued more debt. Secondly, if the parents making 150k are not willing to help out a little bit for medical school, I feel like that is somewhat selfish unless they have 1+ children in college.
 
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MedPR

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This only works BECAUSE my Dad makes more money going around the country looking for jobs than was spent in order for him to do so. It's not like we send him on a vacation. Also my Mom's the breadwinner.
The initial investment had to come from somewhere.

The $40k family cannot afford to make that investment hoping one parent will make more money than initially spent because the risk of losing it (and whatever income could've been made by not traveling around) is too great.
 

MedPR

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It is my parent's retirement savings.
Why does your family need $100k to support itself? How many people are in your family?

It is irresponsible to touch your retirement savings unless you absolutely need it and I can't think of many reasons why any family pulling in anywhere near $100k would need it.
 
Aug 11, 2012
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The initial investment had to come from somewhere.

The $40k family cannot afford to make that investment hoping one parent will make more money than initially spent because the risk of losing it (and whatever income could've been made by not traveling around) is too great.
I can explain and continue this sidetrack, but I'd rather remind you of my initial statement.
The point is if both students receive NOTHING from their parents, they should be on equal ground financial aid wise. There's a different income number for each family that determines how much that family can contribute. It's not the same across the board.
 
Aug 11, 2012
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Why does your family need $100k to support itself? How many people are in your family?

It is irresponsible to touch your retirement savings unless you absolutely need it and I can't think of many reasons why any family pulling in anywhere near $100k would need it.
1) This is extremely off topic.
2) We only reach the $100k mark after the amount pulled from retirement is included.
3) Medical Bills, 2 kids in college, the trailer/second household, and we help provide food for the family on my mom's side. I was literally raised with my cousins. If your Aunts & Uncles with children all make less than 30k a year, you help them out. So yeah my Parents make more than average, but it doesn't mean they're giving the money to ME.
 

MedPR

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I can explain and continue this sidetrack, but I'd rather remind you of my initial statement.
The point is if both students receive NOTHING from their parents, they should be on equal ground financial aid wise. There's a different income number for each family that determines how much that family can contribute. It's not the same across the board.
There's no way to determine how much money students are receiving from their parents. For example, just because a student takes out the maximum amount does not mean that their parents aren't giving them money too. The student could be (irresponsibly) taking out more loans so that s/he can spend more on alcohol. You just never know. And there's no way to know.

Edit: another example.

Student A goes to a super expensive UG that costs 75k per year. Their parents contribute 25k per year and the student takes out 50k per year in loans. That's 200k in loans before any interest.

Student B goes to a less-expensive UG that costs 50k per year. Their parents contribute nothing. So Student B also has 200k in loans before interest.

They have the same amount in loans, but studnt A got support. Your initial opinion was that you should get the same amount of need based aid as someone with the same amount of UG debt. Makes no sense.
 
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Offering financial aid to students with lower income is also the way to attract low-income applicants to enroll in med school. For people with higher incomes, a large debt sounds scary, but it is manageable. For someone from a lower income family, it sounds impossible.

Schools also save money for people with families or who have other people they need to support.
 
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1) This is extremely off topic.
2) We only reach the $100k mark after the amount pulled from retirement is included.
3) Medical Bills, 2 kids in college, the trailer/second household, and we help provide food for the family on my mom's side. I was literally raised with my cousins. If your Aunts & Uncles with children all make less than 30k a year, you help them out. So yeah my Parents make more than average, but it doesn't mean they're giving the money to ME.
Just to put this in perspective, a family making $100,000 a year would be expected to contribute approximately $20,000 a year towards college tuition for all children. This isn't an unreasonable amount, so if you have a sibling, then $10,000 for you personally. So, your "loan burden" due to this would be an extra $10,000 compared to the person whos family had no EFC. So over four years, you have to take out $40,000 extra in loans. Was it worth it to not have to worry about money growing up? to have a stable roof over your head? food in your mouth? tuba lessons? soccer games? girl scouts? get it? If you end up down on your luck, car accident, mental breakdown, etc, your parents would help you out right?

Need based aid generally isn't "all or nothing" someone with no EFC generally doesn't get 100% of tuition payed for. Schools that have need based aid generally try to contribute some percentage of calculated aid for everyone with need
 
Aug 11, 2012
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There's no way to determine how much money students are receiving from their parents. For example, just because a student takes out the maximum amount does not mean that their parents aren't giving them money too. The student could be (irresponsibly) taking out more loans so that s/he can spend more on alcohol. You just never know. And there's no way to know.

Edit: another example.

Student A goes to a super expensive UG that costs 75k per year. Their parents contribute 25k per year and the student takes out 50k per year in loans. That's 200k in loans before any interest.

Student B goes to a less-expensive UG that costs 50k per year. Their parents contribute nothing. So Student B also has 200k in loans before interest.

They have the same amount in loans, but studnt A got support. Your initial opinion was that you should get the same amount of need based aid as someone with the same amount of UG debt. Makes no sense.
That wouldn't be the ONLY factor. I meant it should be A factor. (also I think it's ironic how the less expensive UG is 50k per year)
 

MedPR

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That wouldn't be the ONLY factor. I meant it should be A factor. (also I think it's ironic how the less expensive UG is 50k per year)
I picked 50k for simplicity, but that's not the point. Having UG debt factor into how much need-based aid someone is eligible for just doesn't make sense to me unless every college had the same COA. In most cases, students who go to expensive private schools could have chosen to go to a cheaper school. If you choose to go to a school that will leave you with a ton of debt, that's your problem. Not the government or any other aid-giving organization.

I know many people who have lower HH income than my parents that have less UG debt than me because they went to a state college. If they were to go to medical school, they'd have less debt, but their parents would also be less able (mine aren't able to contribute either) to contribute than mine. My choice to go to a more expensive college should not be used (even as just one criteria) to take money away from more needy students.
 

MedPR

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Dec 1, 2011
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Pre-Podiatry
So your altruistic parents that help out feeding your mother's extended family wouldn't take you and your two broken legs in and feed you for the 6-8 weeks it takes you to recover?
This is the key right here. Your parents choose to distribute their funds to other people. That's different than not having the funds to take care of you in an emergency situation. A very important point that many people in this thread are missing.
 

EarthtoneJon

7+ Year Member
Aug 14, 2011
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Medical Student
Your parents' income doesn't matter on FAFSA. All medical school students are independents. And you are obligated to input your parents' income if you are going to try and get anything out of your school.
Red text, gotcha.

Blue text...so, if I choose the "skip" (or whatever) option for parent's information, I can get need-based financial aid from the government, but X School of Medicine will not give me money? I thought the latter was merit based?

Sorry to hijack the thread, but I think this is a good question.
 

MedPR

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Pre-Podiatry
Red text, gotcha.

Blue text...so, if I choose the "skip" (or whatever) option for parent's information, I can get need-based financial aid from the government, but X School of Medicine will not give me money? I thought the latter was merit based?

Sorry to hijack the thread, but I think this is a good question.
They briefly mentioned it in all of my financial aid talks (during interview days) and it just stuck in my head that I need to give my parents info to maximize my opportunities for aid. I don't know if it's need or merit based and frankly (not trying to be rude) I don't care because aid is aid :).
From the AAMC
Parent information is typically required by medical schools for students who wish to be considered for institutional financial aid (aid given by the medical school)&#8211;even though an applicant is considered independent for purposes of federal loans. Don't forget to list your medical school's federal ID code to ensure the results of your FAFSA are sent to your medical school's financial aid office.
https://www.aamc.org/services/first/first_factsheets/112328/financial_aid_application_process.html
 
Aug 11, 2012
132
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Medical Student
So your altruistic parents that help out feeding your mother's extended family wouldn't take you and your two broken legs in and feed you for the 6-8 weeks it takes you to recover?
Not really sure why they would need to if I get an apartment building with an elevator. Would they buy my groceries? Unlikely. My mom works all day and my dad works out of the state. I could just dig more into loans and have the food delivered if I really couldn't rely on food nearby campus. My mom sometimes can do extreme couponing though so she might give me the coupons in her file cabinet that she can't use.


Anyway, I'm calling this a night and giving hw the priority.
 
Last edited:
Feb 23, 2011
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Not really sure why they would need to if I get an apartment building with an elevator. Would they buy my groceries? Unlikely. My mom works all day and my dad works out of the state. I could just dig more into loans and have the food delivered if I really couldn't rely on food nearby campus. My mom sometimes can do extreme couponing though so she might give me the coupons in her file cabinet that she can't use.
Well at least the image of someone trying to get in and out of an elevator with a half body cast and two sacks of groceries is pretty amusing... :bang:

But you're missing the point here... If your family has the money to help out extended family, they have the money to help you out.
 

MedPR

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Pre-Podiatry
Well at least the image of someone trying to get in and out of an elevator with a half body cast and two sacks of groceries is pretty amusing... :bang:

But you're missing the point here... If your family has the money to help out extended family, they have the money to help you out.
:thumbup: