nightowl0721

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Sep 5, 2012
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Hi guys, so today I asked my physics professor if he can write me a LOR and he said he could. But he told me that I should tell him more about myself, because at the current moment all he knows is that I go to his office hours a lot and I am doing pretty good in his class. I asked him what would help him write the letter and he said any extracurricular activities or anything that's important to me. I was wondering if you guys, especially those who has been in this situation before can tell me what kinds of stuff I should tell him to help him write a good letter. Thanks.
 

wiloghby

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I applied as a non-trad. I gave letter writers who requested such information two pieces of paper. The first was my resume / CV, so they could see what my background was like and what other skills and work experience I had before starting my post-bacc and testing my interest in medicine.

The second sheet was a list of all of the ECs and accomplishments that I managed to do during my post-bacc along with a brief (1 or 2 sentences) description where appropriate.

In one case, the professor requested these docuements and simultaneously scheduled a meeting/interview in his office to get to know me better and to ask any questions he had about my background or experience.
 

Longshot6

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Usually resumes are sufficient. Maybe even a copy of your personal statement so his letter of recommendation will incorporate some of content in the personal statement.
 
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nightowl0721

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Sep 5, 2012
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I applied as a non-trad. I gave letter writers who requested such information two pieces of paper. The first was my resume / CV, so they could see what my background was like and what other skills and work experience I had before starting my post-bacc and testing my interest in medicine.

The second sheet was a list of all of the ECs and accomplishments that I managed to do during my post-bacc along with a brief (1 or 2 sentences) description where appropriate.

In one case, the professor requested these docuements and simultaneously scheduled a meeting/interview in his office to get to know me better and to ask any questions he had about my background or experience.
Thanks for the replies so far. I have a question about the ECs and accomplishments though. Should I mention the accomplishments or scholarships from high school too or should I limit it to just college? Thanks again.
 

tantacles

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Thanks for the replies so far. I have a question about the ECs and accomplishments though. Should I mention the accomplishments or scholarships from high school too or should I limit it to just college? Thanks again.
You can mention anything. Write a resume that essentially lays out your entire professional history, including awards, jobs, and schooling. Also, write him a short paragraph that explains a little bit about you as a person, essentially a shortened personal statement. You can send these materials to him and then discuss them with him in his office if he has questions.
 
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nightowl0721

5+ Year Member
Sep 5, 2012
159
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middle of nowhere
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Pre-Medical
You can mention anything. Write a resume that essentially lays out your entire professional history, including awards, jobs, and schooling. Also, write him a short paragraph that explains a little bit about you as a person, essentially a shortened personal statement. You can send these materials to him and then discuss them with him in his office if he has questions.
Ok, awesome. Thanks for the advice.
 

Ruskithin

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Feb 20, 2013
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I agree with what others have posted but I would be careful just leaving it at that. You don't want him to just regurgitate your awards/activities (i.e what you will do on the amcas app anyway). That would be a very ineffective LOR.

For an effective LOR, get to know your professor. You mention you attend office hours frequently. Next time, take a look around. What do you see? Paintings on the walls? Ships in bottles? A globe or family pictures? Notice something and then comment on it. Start a conversation and let your professor find out about you through your informal repartee. People love to talk about themselves and they think highly of people who let them do so. In the end, you want the professor to develop a "good feeling" about you because you want him to write an emotionally-engaging letter. A good LOR is not just a list of accomplishments; it's also a character sketch. So let your professor see your personality.

Good luck!!