need to vent

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by Deepa100, May 26, 2008.

  1. Deepa100

    Deepa100 Junior Member

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    I have been preparing for 4 months now, 3-4 hrs. each day. I am known to be reasonably intelligent and did extremely well in school, always.

    I am having such hard time w/ this comprehension/passage type of MCAT testing. I am taking my time to make sure that I am well prepared but I am really feeling burned out today. I am scoring mid-upper twenties still, I yet have to see a 30 in one of the sample tests.

    Will I ever get to scoring 30+ in these tests??
     
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  3. njbmd

    njbmd Guest
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    It might be a good time to stop focusing on your score by itself and start focusing on how much positive change happens with your scores. MCAT has nothing to do with how you did in school or intelligence. I am living proof of that fact.

    As soon as you stop obsessing about a particular number and start focusing on the process, you are likely to see the numbers that you seek. You are not on a quest for the "crystal skull" here.
     
  4. nu2004

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    i did better on the real deal than i had on any of my practice tests. then again, i only took 2 full-length practice tests, and my personality type is such that i thrive under the pressure to perform. the point is that these tests may not be a perfect predictor of how you will do on the actual MCAT.

    i really think "psyching yourself out" is a real phenomenon. as njbmd mentions, try not to focus on the score. if it is a constant source of anxiety for you, it will affect your ability to perform in the exam. this is a crude analogy, but for men it's sort of like performance anxiety in bed. you're worried about achieving the desired effect so much that guess what - you don't achieve the desired effect.

    try to think in terms of "beating" each test. remember - the correct answer is in front of you every single time. the correct answers are hidden in the passage or in your brain every single time. the material for the MCAT is not difficult. in fact, you probably know most of it cold. just be aware that you need your brain to be nimble and up to the challenge.

    are you simulating test-day conditions? eating some high-carb snacks at break times? i took some orange juice, a cliff bar and a banana with me on test day and ate a little of each during 2 of my breaks. if you establish a routine like this, you'll be more comfortable on test day -- it will be just like you've practiced.

    don't fret about this too much. try to change the way you think about your scores and the way you approach the test. have confidence that you will succeed when it matters.

    :luck:
     
  5. nu2004

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    just saw this tonight. enjoyed it.
     
  6. Deepa100

    Deepa100 Junior Member

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    Thanks, folks!

    I will try to be more serious about the "process" and get into the exam mode more.

    My test date is July 10th so, I am starting to get excited!
     
  7. nontrdgsbuiucmd

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    Hi, I've had similar experiences regarding having no probs with academic work at any point or sheer "processing" ability but having a tough time with the MCAT, I'm re-sitting for the 7/10 one also.

    I've had more luck with the exam krackers books than I did with audio material or Kaplan books/online classes, because I absorb info best visually. First time around I now realize that I got somewhat caught up with the "process" rather than making sure I first had a very strong grip on all material, and the test somewhat psyched me out. I'd read too many "do it this way", "take notes this way on passages" etc suggestions.

    Recently I've started personalizing the test to the way I do best.. read the passages closely, make mental rather than "on paper" notes, stop after each paragraph to determine what the paragraph said & how it fits into the whole passage, take a 5 second mental break after each passage to 'recuperate' before starting a new one, etc. I like to do the discretes first, also. Scored a balanced 30 (1st time this high) on an old Aamc test using an approach that is personlized to my style, although my previous aamc/practice grades last year had capped out around 27 or so, it can be done, best of luck!
     

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