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JMD

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I just took Dr. Doan's "Who's browsing" poll and felt guilty that I never actually post in the optho forum, so I have a few quick questions.


I am interested in both neuro and optho. When it comes time to apply through SF match, are you able to apply to programs in 2 specialties if you are still contemplating where you would like to end up?

I have heard that neuro residents can do neuro-opthalmology fellowships. Where would they fall in terms of practicing after completing such a fellowship?

That's all for now. I am sure I will have plenty more questions in about 2 years. :cool:
 

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JMD said:
I am interested in both neuro and optho. When it comes time to apply through SF match, are you able to apply to programs in 2 specialties if you are still contemplating where you would like to end up?
There is nothing to prevent you from doing so; however, I would advise against it. Applying to any 2 specialties could be potentially damaging to your chances of matching in either. For purposes of application and interview, you need to come across as having a strong, resolute interest in the field. As there is no way (that I know of) to submit multiple personal statements through SFMatch, you really need to pick a single path and stick to it. If you are unsure, do rotations (or at least shadow) in each to clarify things for yourself.

JMD said:
I have heard that neuro residents can do neuro-opthalmology fellowships. Where would they fall in terms of practicing after completing such a fellowship?
True, there are both neurology- and ophthalmology-trained neuro-ophthalmologists out there, and as far as their subspecialization goes, they are essentially the same. From what I understand, neuro-ophthalmology is a rather low-volume subspecialty. You'll find that the majority are affiliated with academic institutions and tend to be half-time clinicians and half-time researchers or administrators. The choice of path depends on what you want to do when you aren't practicing neuro-ophthalmology. As an ophthalmologist, you can perform surgeries (e.g., muscles, cataracts) and/or practice as a general clinical ophthalmologist. As a neurologist, you can practice as a general clinical neurologist, but surgery is obviously out.

Hope this helps. :D
 
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