WiredEntropy

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There needs to be mandatory hospital disclosure of doctors/nurses/PA/NP salaries. The Dodd-Frank Act took a step in this direction in instructing SEC to require public corporations to disclose the ratio between the pay of the CEO and the avg employee; unfortunately, the SEC has not yet followed through with this. Greater knowledge about wage inequalities within hospitals and between hospitals can generate needed pressure on the hospitals (or at least those where disparities are greatest) to improve wages at the bottom (and perhaps to hold down salaries at the top)
 

NTF

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1st post-fellowship job (2 years in). Child neurologist with subspecialty fellowship training.

Multi-disciplinary not-profit health group, hybrid private/academic model (mostly private sensibilities), joint appointment at the local medical school
Medium size neurology group
Base salary (guaranteed, not RVU based) - 300k, chance for production/quality measure bonus of 1-5% of base salary/yr
Mostly clinic based, 4 days clinic + 1 day admin is typical week for me.
60m for new visits, 30m follow ups, typically 10-13 patients per day.
Night call ~2-3x/month
Inpatient consult weeks (includes the weekend) ~ 1x every 2 months
Generous retirement, disability and life insurance packages
$1500/yr for CME/travel. Additional funds can be applied for if you are presenting at a meeting.
We have 2 child neuro residents per year (doesn't always fill)

About 70-80% of my practice is within the fellowship subspecialty, 20-30% is general child neurology
My patient numbers are probably slightly lower than some of my colleagues but I run several multidisciplinary clinics that are considered "flagship clinics" that raise the profile of my hospital. I'm not sure what my RVUs are but I imagine they are typical or slightly above average for my subspecialty. I also help with the residency program, resident/medical student education and educational outreach to local pediatricians/schools.


Addendum: The health group made all of us take a pay cut during COVID in 2020 and froze retirement contributions. Salaries and retirement contributions were returned to pre-COVID level after the new year and they maxed all our 2020 bonuses.
 
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xenotype

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1st post-fellowship job (2 years in). Child neurologist with subspecialty fellowship training.

Multi-disciplinary not-profit health group, hybrid private/academic model (mostly private sensibilities), joint appointment at the local medical school
Medium size neurology group
Base salary (guaranteed, not RVU based) - 300k, chance for production/quality measure bonus of 1-5% of base salary/yr
Mostly clinic based, 4 days clinic + 1 day admin is typical week for me.
60m for new visits, 30m follow ups, typically 10-13 patients per day.
Night call ~2-3x/month
Inpatient consult weeks (includes the weekend) ~ 1x every 2 months
Generous retirement, disability and life insurance packages
$1500/yr for CME/travel. Additional funds can be applied for if you are presenting at a meeting.
We have 2 child neuro residents per year (doesn't always fill)

About 70-80% of my practice is within the fellowship subspecialty, 20-30% is general child neurology
My patient numbers are probably slightly lower than some of my colleagues but I run several multidisciplinary clinics that are considered "flagship clinics" that raise the profile of my hospital. I'm not sure what my RVUs are but I imagine they are typical or slightly above average for my subspecialty. I also help with the residency program, resident/medical student education and educational outreach to local pediatricians/schools.


Addendum: The health group made all of us take a pay cut during COVID in 2020 and froze retirement contributions. Salaries and retirement contributions were returned to pre-COVID level after the new year and they maxed all our 2020 bonuses.

Not bad at all, especially for peds. Region? Desirable city?
 
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I have a unique practice set-up so worth sharing I think.

Employed income: $30,000/year from full-time M-F 8-5 research gig from grants, employed at Top 20 U.S. News major research university. I have full health insurance, dental, vision. But I use these from my wife's insurance more than my own (better health system). No retirement matching. This is an 8-5 gig but given it is research it occupies much more of my time and mental capacity than that. I am more or less always "working".

Non-employed / 1099 / Independent-Contractor income: I work with two different TeleHealth companies, one being a very large national company and another being a smaller regional group. The pay structure is different for the two, but the overall hourly rates are similar. I take around 180 hrs of "call" a month, where much of those hours I am sleeping, and some of those hours I am getting a consult every 10 minutes. I really only do nights/weekends because of my day job, and I pick my own hours liberally. I only provide acute/emergency consult services, no follow-ups, no scheduled patients. It is eat-what-you-kill. No health insurance, no retirement. Some gentle CME money and tech reimbursement. This was approximately $370,000 this past year.

Total income comes to around 400k a year. I will likely be scaling back clinical work to transition full-time to industry and other non-clinical consulting/research gigs, which pay less but I find more interesting.
 
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sloh

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I have a unique practice set-up so worth sharing I think.

Employed income: $30,000/year from full-time M-F 8-5 research gig from grants, employed at Top 20 U.S. News major research university. I have full health insurance, dental, vision. But I use these from my wife's insurance more than my own (better health system). No retirement matching. This is an 8-5 gig but given it is research it occupies much more of my time and mental capacity than that. I am more or less always "working".

Non-employed / 1099 / Independent-Contractor income: I work with two different TeleHealth companies, one being a very large national company and another being a smaller regional group. The pay structure is different for the two, but the overall hourly rates are similar. I take around 180 hrs of "call" a month, where much of those hours I am sleeping, and some of those hours I am getting a consult every 10 minutes. I really only do nights/weekends because of my day job, and I pick my own hours liberally. I only provide acute/emergency consult services, no follow-ups, no scheduled patients. It is eat-what-you-kill. No health insurance, no retirement. Some gentle CME money and tech reimbursement. This was approximately $370,000 this past year.

Total income comes to around 400k a year. I will likely be scaling back clinical work to transition full-time to industry and other non-clinical consulting/research gigs, which pay less but I find more interesting.
Wow that's impressive. 370k just doing Telehealth
 

xenotype

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Wow that's impressive. 370k just doing Telehealth

I've seen similar numbers. Teleneurology for around 15 12hr shifts a month or 180hrs per month- no benefits, Range seems to be $300-450k depending on how fast you can see consults. Involves nights and weekends obviously, and a lot of acute stroke. Granted this is indepedent contractor for these companies- much higher taxes.
 
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I've seen similar numbers. Teleneurology for around 15 12hr shifts a month or 180hrs per month- no benefits, Range seems to be $300-450k depending on how fast you can see consults. Involves nights and weekends obviously, and a lot of acute stroke. Granted this is indepedent contractor for these companies- much higher taxes.
Yes, more recently (over the last 4-6 months) it averages around 200/hr, which works out to around 430k a year. That said, you are not "working" 180 hours a month. I usually only get woken-up once overnight where my sleep is disrupted, so the hourly rate for the hours where I am actually seeing patients is much higher than 200/hr. The taxes are heavily dependent on which state you live in, but I pay no more in taxes vs if I made the same income via W2s, since my joint-filing AGI is so high anyway. There are many legal tricks (LLC, S-Corp) that I do not personally exploit to shelter the 1099 income, but that many other ICs do. The set-up works for me since I have a very atypical job set-up. I live in a major metro area where pay is lower for employed gigs than the national average. I am not aware of any local job in my area where I would be able to make as much as I do as an IC doing Tele, even with the tax structure. I could easily clear 600k a year if I did it full-time and had open hours M-F 8-5.
 
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9732doc

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Feb 3, 2019
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I have a unique practice set-up so worth sharing I think.

Employed income: $30,000/year from full-time M-F 8-5 research gig from grants, employed at Top 20 U.S. News major research university. I have full health insurance, dental, vision. But I use these from my wife's insurance more than my own (better health system). No retirement matching. This is an 8-5 gig but given it is research it occupies much more of my time and mental capacity than that. I am more or less always "working".

Non-employed / 1099 / Independent-Contractor income: I work with two different TeleHealth companies, one being a very large national company and another being a smaller regional group. The pay structure is different for the two, but the overall hourly rates are similar. I take around 180 hrs of "call" a month, where much of those hours I am sleeping, and some of those hours I am getting a consult every 10 minutes. I really only do nights/weekends because of my day job, and I pick my own hours liberally. I only provide acute/emergency consult services, no follow-ups, no scheduled patients. It is eat-what-you-kill. No health insurance, no retirement. Some gentle CME money and tech reimbursement. This was approximately $370,000 this past year.

Total income comes to around 400k a year. I will likely be scaling back clinical work to transition full-time to industry and other non-clinical consulting/research gigs, which pay less but I find more interesting.
This is fascinating. Thanks for sharing. So day job is research? Basic, translational, clinical? Running a lab or working as part of a research team? The telehealth salary is phenomenal. Did you have to find the telehealth options on your own or did your institution help you? This is unconventional but in a really good way.
 

sharkbaitwhohaha

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Mar 25, 2014
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I have a unique practice set-up so worth sharing I think.

Employed income: $30,000/year from full-time M-F 8-5 research gig from grants, employed at Top 20 U.S. News major research university. I have full health insurance, dental, vision. But I use these from my wife's insurance more than my own (better health system). No retirement matching. This is an 8-5 gig but given it is research it occupies much more of my time and mental capacity than that. I am more or less always "working".

Non-employed / 1099 / Independent-Contractor income: I work with two different TeleHealth companies, one being a very large national company and another being a smaller regional group. The pay structure is different for the two, but the overall hourly rates are similar. I take around 180 hrs of "call" a month, where much of those hours I am sleeping, and some of those hours I am getting a consult every 10 minutes. I really only do nights/weekends because of my day job, and I pick my own hours liberally. I only provide acute/emergency consult services, no follow-ups, no scheduled patients. It is eat-what-you-kill. No health insurance, no retirement. Some gentle CME money and tech reimbursement. This was approximately $370,000 this past year.

Total income comes to around 400k a year. I will likely be scaling back clinical work to transition full-time to industry and other non-clinical consulting/research gigs, which pay less but I find more interesting.
I enjoy seeing the variety of income for neurologists. However, I'm disappointed that you need to support yourself outside of your 9-5 reseach time. You seem like a very passionate researcher. If only to would be appropriately compensated for it....
 

Neurologo

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I work in a Midwest city for a large health system. Non-academic position. I do pretty much everything (outpatient, inpatient, EMG, and EEG) on a daily basis. Hospital call is q2. I make about $330,000/yr (excluding benefits, CME, etc).
That seems unfairly low unless your volume is also very low.
 

Neurologo

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Another friend mentioned that NC outpatient job with q4 call— 18-20 patients a day.. above 450k.

Sounds reasonable for the first 1-2 years if in private practice. After that, you could ask for more production % share. Being on call for your clinic is built-in the that pay and unavoidable in most cases. Being on call for inpatient should always be extra pay.
 
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This is fascinating. Thanks for sharing. So day job is research? Basic, translational, clinical? Running a lab or working as part of a research team? The telehealth salary is phenomenal. Did you have to find the telehealth options on your own or did your institution help you? This is unconventional but in a really good way.
Very basic. All in silico modeling work, really more applied EECS than Neuroscience. I am a research fellow, hence the low salary. Tele work all on my own.
 
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WiredEntropy

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Does anyone have any insight into the salary of a neuro-oncologist?
varies widely by practice setting; many neuro-oncologists work within academic medical centers, and most academic medical centers are known to collude to massively suppress salaries of their neurologists who often don't know that they could be making 3x+ more outside of the ivory tower.
 

kazill

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varies widely by practice setting; many neuro-oncologists work within academic medical centers, and most academic medical centers are known to collude to massively suppress salaries of their neurologists who often don't know that they could be making 3x+ more outside of the ivory tower.
Fair point! Then again can you really put a price on getting to call yourself "assistant professor"?

Is it fair to assume that in a private practice setting (if such a thing exists for neuro-onc) the salaries would be commiserate with traditional heme/onc trained physicians?
 

Chibucks15

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Fair point! Then again can you really put a price on getting to call yourself "assistant professor"?

Is it fair to assume that in a private practice setting (if such a thing exists for neuro-onc) the salaries would be commiserate with traditional heme/onc trained physicians?
To a degree...but at the same time volume of “regular” cancer far outweighs volume of brain cancer or brain mets
 

xenotype

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Doubtful you'll do much better in neuro-onc than just doing general neurology. Many onc settings seem like they need someone doing EEG, EMG, and managing AEDs much more than someone to hand out temodar and avastin all day. The actual day to day practice is more morbid than ALS clinic personally- crushingly depressing. You tend to only see neuro-onc in big centers because a local heme-onc can easily manage first line therapy themselves.

Heme-onc has had some major advances in the past decade that have genuinely extended what they are able to do for patients. There really hasn't been anything for glioblastoma, which is still the majority of neuro-onc clinic, and still a complete and terrible death sentence after immunotherapies really failed to add anything in recent trials.
 
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