Other OT-Related Information New Mandate from ACOTE: Entry-level doctorate by 2027

Bokonomy

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https://www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Accreditation/acote-doctoral-mandate-2027.aspx

For those applying to OT school, ACOTE is the accrediting board that deals with changing in standards. In 2015(?), AOTA (our professional organization) had recommended switching to entry level OTD, but ACOTE had decided at the time it was not necessary. However, they have reversed their decision. This will not affect incoming students for the next few years, as they will continue to be grandfathered in at the master's level, but something to consider.

Entry level COTAs will be at the bachelor level, which is something to consider for those of you in high school/not yet in college.
 

MrTL

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Read about this in the OT4OT fb group. So many people current and future OT's are upset about it. I'm not sure how I feel about it yet...

OT is not so impacted like PT is, so it could be a step in the right direction for notoriety and respect. But it could prevent a lot of talent from getting into wanting to do OT, especially since pay scales currently don't match the amount of debt students will have to go through to get an OTD. It could also change how OT's get into academia. Will they need a PhD to teach after that?! That would be pretty crazy.
 
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https://www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Accreditation/acote-doctoral-mandate-2027.aspx

For those applying to OT school, ACOTE is the accrediting board that deals with changing in standards. In 2015(?), AOTA (our professional organization) had recommended switching to entry level OTD, but ACOTE had decided at the time it was not necessary. However, they have reversed their decision. This will not affect incoming students for the next few years, as they will continue to be grandfathered in at the master's level, but something to consider.

Entry level COTAs will be at the bachelor level, which is something to consider for those of you in high school/not yet in college.
This is the worst decision I can possibly imagine for your field. PT is already backtracking to a two year and then paid internship. Medical is backing to three year models. Literally read in the med forum about the debate of how useless our education system is and how completely unsustainable this is. Pharmacy is going to the integrated six from undergrad. We have over 1.5 trillion in student debt. All this will do is make universities more money.
 
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Bokonomy

Bokonomy

2+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2015
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Read about this in the OT4OT fb group. So many people current and future OT's are upset about it. I'm not sure how I feel about it yet...

OT is not so impacted like PT is, so it could be a step in the right direction for notoriety and respect. But it could prevent a lot of talent from getting into wanting to do OT, especially since pay scales currently don't match the amount of debt students will have to go through to get an OTD. It could also change how OT's get into academia. Will they need a PhD to teach after that?! That would be pretty crazy.
Well, there are currently master's level instructors, and the OTD is terminal, so I just think it means that the majority of the faculty will need either a clinical or academic doctorate.
 
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Bokonomy

Bokonomy

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This is the worst decision I can possibly imagine for your field. PT is already backtracking to a two year and then paid internship. Medical is backing to three year models. Literally read in the med forum about the debate of how useless our education system is and how completely unsustainable this is. Pharmacy is going to the integrated six from undergrad. We have over 1.5 trillion in student debt. All this will do is make universities more money.
I'm assuming you're not from the US (given your UN), but I think it's particularly concerning, given that public service loan forgiveness will no longer exist, and the general proposed cuts to education. I just feel like the environment is unstable with our current presidential adminstration, and healthcare/education could be in a bad spot in 10 years.
 
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I'm assuming you're not from the US (given your UN), but I think it's particularly concerning, given that public service loan forgiveness will no longer exist, and the general proposed cuts to education. I just feel like the environment is unstable with our current presidential adminstration, and healthcare/education could be in a bad spot in 10 years.
US

This is just another drop in the bucket steadily overflowing that is leading to an unsustainable system though.

I'm assuming that this will make the administration a heavy amount of money, and when the students will be forced to fend for themselves when they can't find repayment options coupled with the demographic in power wanting to increasingly cut healthcare costs in the future, it doesn't work systematically.

I can't tell if the professional associations know what's going on, and what they are creating for the future. All of this degree inflation seems to be to match what MDs did decades ago largely due to science increasing, supply and demand restriction and screen out for intelligent students to work in healthcare, however, now it is just unnecessary.....med schools are now downsizing the timelength because it is completely unsustainable.

We need to return to apprenticeships. Stop increasing "education timelengths"

Simply have a prerequisite curriculum or content specific to the field of two years like an associates, with a proposed credit count to screen if students can handle heavy coursework which increases in intensity....that will reflect in gpa. Provide an examination like the gre and a personal statement as well and factor that in with interview skills.

There doesn't need to be a bachelors degree requirement. Others can matriculate in after a bachelors degree as a career change if they want to change fields later.

Then, create two year, yearround curriculums to matriculate into with two week breaks in between each semester that follows disbursement of federal funding from the government.

Sit for boards and work under a temporary license for a salary that allows you to pay off accumulated debt for the preboards portion as your apprenticeship.

Heck OT coursework isn't even long enough to be two years. That's not to be rude....it just isnt. Medical coursework is actually about 19 months. You need the foundational sciences and then the ability to think critically with a behavior to adapt scientific inquiry to application for patients.

You could have maybe a 1.5 year curriculum. Take OT boards, then match to a hospital on an apprentice license in january, paid a salary. Work underneath a clinician, pay off NECESSARY loans, which is not what schools are charging by the way.....it's well above all inflation....which is why it needs to be capped.......and if there is more content to work with and study while completing paid clinicals, then do so at the end of the apprenticeship with a full boards licensure exam. You can study at night after working during the day.

I am ASTOUNDED leadership isn't doing this for ALL health professions. Rehab, dentistry, pharmacy, medical. We don't need inflationary degrees. We need a base knowledge set for safety that is cost effective, then supervised apprenticeship with patient cases, and then full licensure and employment....all the while, living on a stipend that will allow debt payoff that makes the full system work.

I'm also under the belief that OT and PT shouldn't be separate professional designations. It should all be just physiotherapy.....with subspecialization to patient populations and environments occurring during an apprenticeship postgrad.
 
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beestrng

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Dec 10, 2010
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Run for AOTA president. You'll win :)

US

This is just another drop in the bucket steadily overflowing that is leading to a possible future collapse of the system.

I'm assuming that this will make the professors and administration a heavy amount of money and when the students will be forced to fend for themselves when they can't find repayment options and the demographic in power wants to increasingly cut healthcare costs in the future.

This is scary. I can't tell if the professional associations know what's going on, and what they are creating for the future. All of this degree inflation seems to be to match what MDs did decades ago largely due to science increasing.....yet med schools are now downsizing the timelength because it is completely unsustainable.

We need to return to apprenticeships. Stop increasing "education timelengths"

Simply have a prerequisite curriculum or content specific to the field of two years like an associates, with a proposed credit count to screen if students can handle heavy coursework which increases in intensity....that will reflect in gpa. Provide an examination like the gre and a personal statement as well and factor that in with interview skills.

There doesn't need to be a bachelors degree requirement. Others can matriculate in after a bachelors degree as a career change if they want to change fields later.

Then, create two year, yearround curriculums to matriculate into with two week breaks in between each semester that follows disbursement of federal funding from the government.

Sit for boards and work under a temporary license for a salary that allows you to pay off accumulated debt for the preboards portion as your apprenticeship.

Heck OT coursework isn't even long enough to be be two years. That's not to be rude....it just isnt. Medical coursework is actually about 19 months.

You could have maybe a 1.5 year curriculum. Take OT boards, then match to a hospital on an apprentice license in january, paid a salary. Work underneath a clinician, pay off NECESSARY loans, which is not what schools are charging by the way.....it's well above all inflation....and if there is more content to work with and study while completing paid clinicals, then do so at the end of the apprenticeship with a full boards licensure exam.

I am ASTOUNDED leadership isn't doing this for ALL health professions. Rehab, dentistry, pharmacy, medical. We don't need inflationary degrees. We need a base knowledge set for safety that is cost effective, then supervised apprenticeship with patient cases, and then full licensure and employment....all the while, living on a stipend that will allow debt payoff.

I'm also under the belief that OT and PT shouldn't be separate professional designations. It should all be just physiotherapy.....with subspecialization to patient populations and environments occurring during an apprenticeship
 
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Krazi4Sugar

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Apr 3, 2016
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This is the worst decision I can possibly imagine for your field. PT is already backtracking to a two year and then paid internship. Medical is backing to three year models. Literally read in the med forum about the debate of how useless our education system is and how completely unsustainable this is. Pharmacy is going to the integrated six from undergrad. We have over 1.5 trillion in student debt. All this will do is make universities more money.
Where are the two year PT programs with a paid internship? I've been looking up info for OT/PT schools since quite honestly, either of them would interest me. I am leaning towards OT because of it is shorter length of schooling and because it is cheaper overall. Please let me know where you see the 2 year PT program with paid internship?
 
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Where are the two year PT programs with a paid internship? I've been looking up info for OT/PT schools since quite honestly, either of them would interest me. I am leaning towards OT because of it is shorter length of schooling and because it is cheaper overall. Please let me know where you see the 2 year PT program with paid internship?
The two year models don't have required residency yet, although they encourage it.

I made a video about it if y'all wanna check it out:
It isn't equal to physical therapy education. They are different disciplines with overlap. Acute care, cht, and HH are all essentially the same job but there are large differences when looking at how the fields define themselves and function in the rehabilitation process.

There needs to be professional rights protection discussions among disciplines with a mass transition downward in which the basic sciences are taught in the same classrooms in preclinical years. Then, match outs to mentorships for each discipline as I've mentioned up above on temporary licensure.
 
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mangoslush

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Aug 18, 2012
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I also think this is an awful idea. On top of a master's degree requiring 2+ years of school, it often takes people at least a year to complete all the pre-requisites, shadowing hours, testing and other requirements required for admission. It took me a total of five years after undergrad to prepare for OT school, complete the program (my fieldwork II was also delayed 6 months due to a lack of internships), take the boards and at long last, find a job. Increasing the requirements, length and cost of schooling is not the answer. I was honestly not impressed by the academic portion of my grad school curriculum (too much focus on theory and community, less on fundamental skills that 90% of us use in our jobs) and learned the majority of what I know through internships and actual on-the-job training. As other have said, increasing the degree requirements will be a barrier for those wishing to enter the field. I feel like I jumped through a million hoops just to get where I am now, and can only imagine how many hoops future OTs will have to jump through...
 

dobber

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It isn't equal to physical therapy education. They are different disciplines with overlap. Acute care, cht, and HH are all essentially the same job but there are large differences when looking at how the fields define themselves and function in the rehabilitation process.
I never said that... what I said was that one of the driving forces to push OT to an entry-level doctorate is that PT is there already (in addition to legitimizing the field, improved research, direct access push, etc). I apologize if it wasn't clear. Now that we have clarified that, I do want to ask you - if you had the choice to do it your way, how would you go about the MOT vs. OTD thing? Would you leave it as is right now? Or would you make the change?
 
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I never said that... what I said was that one of the driving forces to push OT to an entry-level doctorate is that PT is there already (in addition to legitimizing the field, improved research, direct access push, etc). I apologize if it wasn't clear. Now that we have clarified that, I do want to ask you - if you had the choice to do it your way, how would you go about the MOT vs. OTD thing? Would you leave it as is right now? Or would you make the change?
Leave as is and have a preOT track for school that's completed in five years. Also decrease the number of schools so students stay within the geographic area for clinicals.

A five year program hits the prerequisites as well as the schooling for practice. You need more time? Hit paid residency. Same with my field. Different treatments and approaches, all with contributions to patient wants, values, and needs.

Decreased debt and more overlapping coursework leads to more collaboration.
 
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prodigiousflame

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I'm actually happy about this. Yes sucks for people wanting to apply in ten years but higher barrier to entry=less of a flooded market=more job security for us. There's already enough programs popping up and with potential reimbursement changes around the corner we need something like this (and a bachelors to get a cota)
 
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FINGERS_CROSSED

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I guess I'm not too thrilled about this from a socio-economic standpoint. I don't know how someone without financial resources can prepare for applying for OT school (volunteering, taking prereqs), apply to schools (fees), and support themselves while they are in school. What if this is a second career for some who may already have children? I am lucky to still be living with my parents but not everyone has this cost-saving ability. Adding on now requiring a doctorate on top of all of this can increase this burden for many. I bet there are plenty of people who would fit well in the OT profession but cannot financially make it happen.

(I guess this is more of my concern with the higher education system in this country; not just OT school.)
 
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