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I did not go to New York podiatry school, but I am interested in a residency in NYC. Hopefully you guys that work in these NYC hospitals can help me a bit or those of you at the NY school who have been exposed to the hospitals. How are they with choosing students from other schools?

Do many of them only accept students from the New York school? Are there any residents at NYC hospitals that came from other schools?

Which programs are willing and not willing to accept students from outside NYC?

(When I say NYC, I also mean Brooklyn, Queens, and Bronx)

Thanks for the advice.
 

SupaYeLLowDawg

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I think that whatever state that your school is located in will Always be partial to the students from that school. In NYC, that's not different. I'm from Barry and ended up scrambling up here and discovered that a lot of NY students tend to stay in NY (I don't know why, I hate it up here!)

There seems to be this stigma that if you haven't passed your boards (I and/or II) that you will just flock to NY by default. But just a word of advice that beginning in July 2011, if you have not passed Boards I AND II, you cannot get a temporary permit to be a resident in the state of NY which means you cannot be a Podiatry Resident in NY! I'm VERY Happy that they made this rule as there are a LOT of bad apples here in NY.
 

krabmas

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Why do you want to do a residency in NY?

I would advise against this.
 

PharoPod

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diabeticfootdr

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the culture of medicine vs. podiatry is unfriendly and leads to difficulty getting educated. IMO.
I did residency in NYC. I would agree with Krabmas's comments. The scope of practice is limited. There are few podiatry-ortho friendly relationships. Medicine is highly competitive, including podiatry. The market is saturated, so that leave a lot of pods fighting to trim toenails. Many residency programs in NYC have farm out the resident to trim toenails in nursing homes.

The quality of residents (educationally speaking) is relatively low in NYC compared to that of other regions in the US. This leads to a general feeling of MDs that podiatrists are poorly trained. In my opinion, it's probably related to the school in which they come from.

Could you make it work? Sure. We did. But it took a lot of relationship building and turning the other cheek to ignorant opinions. It's hard enough to just be a resident.
 

dpmgrad

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But just a word of advice that beginning in July 2011, if you have not passed Boards I AND II, you cannot get a temporary permit to be a resident in the state of NY which means you cannot be a Podiatry Resident in NY! I'm VERY Happy that they made this rule as there are a LOT of bad apples here in NY.
Actually, when the new CPME 320 Document passes and takes effect on July 2011, the new CPME 320 Document stipulates that only students passing BOTH NBPME Part I AND II may begin residency training.

Here is the exact wording from the new CPME 320 Document (which is in the final revision stage):

3.6 The sponsoring institution shall accept only graduates of colleges of podiatric medicine accredited by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education. All applicants shall have passed the Parts I and II examinations of the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners prior to beginning the residency.

The podiatry schools have been notified of this since last year. For those students, who are planning to do residency training in a state where they have to take and pass the NBPME Part III exam, prior to the start of residency, will need to take and pass the NBPME Part II exam in March of their 4th year. Since passage of Part II is a requirement for the Part III exam in June, the May administration of the Part II exam will not allow those students to register for the Part III exam in June. For those students, who are planning to do a residency training in a state where Part III is not required, the students can take either the Part II exam either in March or May of their 4th year. Hence, if one fails the March exam, they can still retake it in May. However, if one fails the Part II exam in March and May, that student will not be able to start his/her residency training.
 

Skippygonenuts

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So are new jersey residencies considered as bad as NYC? And are there any residency programs in NYC that are not very anti-pod so to speak?

I'm a NJ resident and interested in nycpm so just looking for some opinions. Thanks.
 

Marry2Pod

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I am in NJ too - I have read on this forum that the UMDNJ residency in Newark is pretty good. NJ has a much better scope of practice for Podiatrists than NY.
 

krabmas

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NJ is a much better place to practice for a podiatrist than NY. Some NY pods have practices in NJ as well to get around the scope issues.

UMDNJ is a great program in jersey. I spent a month their as an extern. It is very structured, has a good balance between clinic and surgery, lots of trauma.

There are a few other programs in NJ that are decent.

You do not have to do residency in NY just because you went to NYCPM, nor do you need to go to NYCPM to get a NY program.
 

Skippygonenuts

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NJ is a much better place to practice for a podiatrist than NY. Some NY pods have practices in NJ as well to get around the scope issues.

UMDNJ is a great program in jersey. I spent a month their as an extern. It is very structured, has a good balance between clinic and surgery, lots of trauma.

There are a few other programs in NJ that are decent.

You do not have to do residency in NY just because you went to NYCPM, nor do you need to go to NYCPM to get a NY program.
Thanks krambas! I'm currently finishing a program in umdnj-Newark so maybe I'll pass by and take a little tour..

And regarding nycpm, I was just under the assumption that programs in the tristate area would take more students from that area.
 
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UNMorBUST

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And regarding nycpm, I was just under the assumption that programs in the tristate area would take more students from that area.
I could be wrong. I think it has to do with more students from NYCPM wanting to stay in the area. So more NYCPM students apply to the programs in the tristate area.
 
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krabmas

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Thanks krambas! Did u rotate in umdnj Newark Stratford or new Brunswick? I'm currently finishing a program in umdnj-Newark so maybe I'll pass by and take a little tour..

And regarding nycpm, I was just under the assumption that programs in the tristate area would take more students from that area.
The only UMDNJ with a podiatry residency is in Newark. You should definitely give them a call and take a tour. Call Dr. Keith Cook, his # is online on the UMDNJ website.