witzelsucht

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cardiologists will tell people to lose weight and exercise, but by the time a cardiologist is onboard theres usually already significant disease. you're talking about preventative medicine, which is really the domain of family physicians and general internists.

noninvasive cardiologists have some time in clinics, seeing patients in follow up or new referrals from primary care physicians. they also will typically admit patients or consult on inpatients with cardiovascular disease. they also see consults in the ED, something like new onset a-fib or heart block, stemi, etc.

it sounds like you want to do primary care. 6 years is a long time to train to prescribe dietary changes
 
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ssj4vinh

ssj4vinh

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Jul 19, 2013
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cardiologists will tell people to lose weight and exercise, but by the time a cardiologist is onboard theres usually already significant disease. you're talking about preventative medicine, which is really the domain of family physicians and general internists.

noninvasive cardiologists have some time in clinics, seeing patients in follow up or new referrals from primary care physicians. they also will typically admit patients or consult on inpatients with cardiovascular disease. they also see consults in the ED, something like new onset a-fib or heart block, stemi, etc.

it sounds like you want to do primary care. 6 years is a long time to train to prescribe dietary changes
this was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for taking the time
 

ROBINHO

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Dec 27, 2004
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I've been doing some internet research on different specialties I may be interested. Non-invasive cardiology appeals to me since I sort of have a belief that we are over-medicating and performing too many surgeries as opposed to preventing/making lifestyle changes. Non-invasive cardiology seems to be concerned primarily with detecting and diagnosing which I could see myself enjoying.

My question is: do non-invasive cardiologists also prescribe dietary and lifestyle changes and follow up with patients in this regard? Who prescribes the non-invasive and non-surgical approaches to treating CVD?

What is the bread-and-butter for non-invasive cardiologist? Do they mostly sit in labs and perform tests and read EKG's?

Please forgive my ignorance. I've never even shadowed a cardiologist.
You talking about preventive cardiology which any cardiologist can do and so do primary care physician.

About from consults and cards admission mentioned above, bread and butter would be reading echocardiogram, keg, nuclear, stress test and coronary ct or mri depending on practice
 

tachycore

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Nov 12, 2005
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You talking about preventive cardiology which any cardiologist can do and so do primary care physician.

About from consults and cards admission mentioned above, bread and butter would be reading echocardiogram, keg, nuclear, stress test and coronary ct or mri depending on practice
CT/MRI (aka, "advanced" cardiac imaging) would be covered only by cardiologists with at least level II training in that area. Such cases are so few, level III cardiologists wouldn't readily give up this line of income / RVU's to level II people.

Plus, at most hospitals, radiology controls the CT and MRI machines and already have enough gripes with other specialties encroaching on theirs.

Also, I disagree about every cardiologist actually knowing what they're doing with preventive measures, much less primary care physicians. See enough drug interactions or very poorly defined diet / exercise / weight loss goals from patients who saw private cardiologists, and you get the picture.

Sadly, guidelines (and possibly the principle of re-certification) can be argued to exist for these physicians.