Non trad friendly/unfriendly MD schools?

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I'm a 37 y/o premed student and will be applying for schools this summer for 2008 matriculation.
I'm aware that most DO schools are open to non traditional student like myself. However, does anyone know which MD schools are particularly known to be open to applicants like us or not open to applicants like us?
Thanks!
 

spicedmanna

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I'm a 37 y/o premed student and will be applying for schools this summer for 2008 matriculation.
I'm aware that most DO schools are open to non traditional student like myself. However, does anyone know which MD schools are particularly known to be open to applicants like us or not open to applicants like us?
Thanks!

I suppose you could use the MSAR and/or the USNWR data to do some research to find out which school appear to accept older students in greater proportion. I don't necessary think it's useful information, however. You should apply according to your desire, the program, and your stats. The schools that tend to have fewer non-trads, in my assessment, are likely to be the more competitive schools, because non-trads tend to have lower numbers to begin with and have had to overcome a possibly spotted academic past. Schools are not supposed to discriminate based on age, and I think that this is mostly true. They do judge applicants based on numbers, though. If your numbers are competitive, you'll be competitive, I'd say.

DO schools appear more forgiving and friendlier to non-trads because their baseline averages tend to be lower, the primary application has grade replacement, and their application process stresses achievements outside of academics with significant weight.
 
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QofQuimica

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I suppose you could use the MSAR and/or the USNWR data to do some research to find out which school appear to accept older students in greater proportion. I don't necessary think it's useful information, however. You should apply according to your desire, the program, and your stats. The schools that tend to have fewer non-trads, in my assessment, are likely to be the more competitive schools, because non-trads tend to have lower numbers to begin with and have had to overcome a possibly spotted academic past. Schools are not supposed to discriminate based on age, and I think that this is mostly true. They do judge applicants based on numbers, though. If your numbers are competitive, you'll be competitive, I'd say.

DO schools appear more forgiving and friendlier to non-trads because their baseline averages tend to be lower, the primary application has grade replacement, and their application process stresses achievements outside of academics with significant weight.
Agree with the above.
 

Law2Doc

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Agree with the above.

Agree as well. If you have the stats, you will get looked at by pretty much any allo school. This question gets posed a couple of times a year, and while there are a handful of schools that get mentioned periodically, these days pretty much every allo school has at least a nontrad or two among its ranks. Apply broadly to schools that interest you.
Don't fall for the XYZ loves nontrads lore, because frankly, if every nontrad thinks this and applies, it becomes more of a competition to get in as a nontrad at such schools, not less, because no school is going to fill their class with nontrads. (A few is diversity, a lot is a bold experiment).
 

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I'm a 37 y/o premed student and will be applying for schools this summer for 2008 matriculation.
I'm aware that most DO schools are open to non traditional student like myself. However, does anyone know which MD schools are particularly known to be open to applicants like us or not open to applicants like us?
Thanks!

Don't fall for the non-trad friendly / non-friendly junk. People make a big deal out of it, and it turned out to be the biggest wasted worry in my case (I'm older than you as well). Just apply to where you want to go and make sure you have a good mix of "reach", within range, and "below range" schools. Keep in mind that the quality of the school you go to (including whether it is DO or not) can affect your residency options. (Don't flame me, I actually like DO).

Make sure your scores, GPA, EC's etc. are excellent and, if at all possible, get advice from a health-professions office at your UG school (I would even enroll in a few classes just to have this access). If necessary, I would even wait a year to make sure everything is as perfect as possible on your application (not everyone has that luxury). Having the help of a health professions office and taking a great MCAT review course (I liked Kaplan online but pick one that matches your learning style) are the two things that should get serious consideration in my mind. Non-trad friendly vs non-friendly shouldn't even be on the radar in my opinion.

The above being said, all the Texas schools I interviewed at (Baylor, UTSW, TxA&M, TTech, TCOM) were all extremely non-trad friendly. I chose not to interview at UTMB (my guess is they would be great as well) and withdrew my TMDSAS app as soon as I got my Baylor acceptance (rather early in the season) so UT-H (heard lots of great things about that school as well) and UTSA (seems great as well) may not have had a chance to invite me (I'm not sure).
 

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Of the schools I interviewed at Mayo, Brown, and OHSU stick out in my mind. Most schools want to have a diverse student body (though all with high MCAT/GPA), so being non-trad is usually a good thing.
 

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To add to my previous post:

The friendliest school(s) for most of us are our state schools no matter what age we are. You should apply to your state schools for sure.

Now, Law2Doc and I have sparred about this in the past, and I don't want to start another argument with the honorable counselor. ;) But I do think there are some schools that tend to attract nontrads and have a social atmosphere that is more amenable to older students. For example, I'm from FL, and although I was accepted to both UF and USF, I can tell you that USF has a *lot* more nontrads than UF does. So if you're wanting to have more nontrad classmates, there is definitely a difference among schools. However, even schools without many nontrads will consider you if your app is competitive. I would agree with L2D that no schools are UNfriendly to nontrads if you have great stats, ECs, LORs, etc. Consider too that it's impossible to know if schools with very young classes accepted nontrads but the nontrads just decided not to attend. Using myself as an example again, I decided not to attend one school because I'd likely be the only person over age 30 there. But they did accept me and offer me a scholarship, so they were hardly unfriendly.
 

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Now, Law2Doc and I have sparred about this in the past, and I don't want to start another argument with the honorable counselor. ;) But I do think there are some schools that tend to attract nontrads and have a social atmosphere that is more amenable to older students.

Agree not to rehash our long bitter war on this.:D I respect your opinion, and understand your valid points, but still think social atmospheres are what you make of them. You won't be excluded from friendships or any of the happy hours or other social events because you are a nontrad.

No reason to fear being the lone nontrad -- someone has to be first, and get that toe-hold, plant that non-trad flag. Apply broadly and find a school that suits you, not one that just caters to your age.
 

QofQuimica

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Agree not to rehash our long bitter war on this.:D I respect your opinion, and understand your valid points, but still think social atmospheres are what you make of them. You won't be excluded from friendships or any of the happy hours or other social events because you are a nontrad.
Sigh. That's the problem. I'm not wanting my social life to revolve around happy hours. :p But yes, it's true that the trads do invite me to their events. I rarely go, but it's not because they don't ask me to go or they're unfriendly. It's more that I'm not into doing keg stands. ;)
 

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Now, Law2Doc and I have sparred about this in the past, and I don't want to start another argument with the honorable counselor. ;) But I do think there are some schools that tend to attract nontrads and have a social atmosphere that is more amenable to older students. For example, I'm from FL, and although I was accepted to both UF and USF, I can tell you that USF has a *lot* more nontrads than UF does. So if you're wanting to have more nontrad classmates, there is definitely a difference among schools.
UF is just "unfriendly" all the way around, nontrad friendly, URM unfriendly, you name it. Not to meniton LIVING in Gainesville? What the HELL was I thinking in 1984?:laugh:
 

QofQuimica

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UF is just "unfriendly" all the way around, nontrad friendly, URM unfriendly, you name it. Not to meniton LIVING in Gainesville? What the HELL was I thinking in 1984?:laugh:
The point I was trying to make though is that as young and stat-driven as UF is, they still interviewed and accepted me. My interviews at UF were the best I had anywhere, even better than at the other schools that have a lot more nontrads. This is in spite of the fact that I definitely went to my UF interview with a bit of a chip on my shoulder and expecting it to be a huge turn-off after USF. I agree with you wholeheartedly about Gainesville, but I was very impressed with the UF med school. I would advise any nontrad who is a FL resident and has competitive stats to give UF a chance.

BTW, did you know that USF has started an MD/PhD program? If you're interested in coming back to FL, you might consider looking into that.
 
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Just want to add a little note here, which is to research schools well and look for those that seem like a good fit for you. Even if they are a state school this can be true, to a degree (I found out by being surprised with an interview to a state school other than my own...) Whether they have a reputation of being nontrad friendly or not, if your activities and interests are in line with theirs, AND you have the test scores & grades to be competitive, AND you get your application in early, they will probably show some interest in you! :luck:
 

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Sigh. That's the problem. I'm not wanting my social life to revolve around happy hours. :p But yes, it's true that the trads do invite me to their events. I rarely go, but it's not because they don't ask me to go or they're unfriendly. It's more that I'm not into doing keg stands. ;)

That's a point, and that's something I've hit with my school. I'm just not interested in most of the socializing that occurs. I had this problem at work, too, though, and have noticed that lots of my friends from college feel similarly about wherever they're at. I think it's hard (especially in the south) to be a 30 some-odd year old person without kids. All the "adult" socializing seems to focus around families and kids, and all the "young people" socializing seems to be about getting wasted at big parties.
 

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All the "adult" socializing seems to focus around families and kids, and all the "young people" socializing seems to be about getting wasted at big parties.

I agree with you. My point was just that there's a world of difference in not being invited to a party in the first place and not wanting to go. The former (being invited), in my mind, constitutes nontrad friendly. The latter is just not wanting to get that friendly back.:)
 

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I'll jump on the bandwagon and say that what matters is how well the schools fit with you as an individual. I am at a very traditional medical school that I feared would not be nontrad friendly. It turns out that while I was the oldest person in my class at 34, earlier and later classes have had students in their 40's. I was one of several moms in the class and many of the students were married or engaged.

It really does boil down to which school is best for you. Don't apply only according to some imagined list of "friendly" schools. Also, don't decline to apply to schools without the "friendly" reputation. If I had done that, I wouldn't be at the school I'm at now and I'm very happy to be here.
 

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It's more that I'm not into doing keg stands. ;)

I loved this QUOTE!!! Given some of your other posts, I have this vision of Einstein in a tiger striped shirt doing a keg stand. Too funny!! :laugh: :love:

To add to my previous post:

The friendliest school(s) for most of us are our state schools no matter what age we are. You should apply to your state schools for sure.

100% agree with this. I think as non-trads we need to keep in mind that as most things, school is alot what you make of it and state schools shouldn't be brushed aside for the "non-trad" friendly OOS school with the 3-4X tuition. Part of being non-trad friendly, IMHO, is understanding that we non-trad typically have a few other financial concerns, like putting food on the table and paying for shoes that get outgrown long before they get used up. So applying widely and including in state schools is best.
 
I'm a 37 y/o premed student and will be applying for schools this summer for 2008 matriculation.
I'm aware that most DO schools are open to non traditional student like myself. However, does anyone know which MD schools are particularly known to be open to applicants like us or not open to applicants like us?
Thanks!

You have gotten some good replies from folks above but I am going to issue a challenge to you to "change your thinking" about application to medical school. Specifically, what I propose to you (and others) is to consider the process of application to medical school FOR what it is, an application. This application is not unlike a job application.

When you apply for a job, my assumption is that you walk into the recruiter/office with your resume in hand and lay out your qualifications for said position. I am fairly certain that you don't look around to see if the job is "friendly" towards "applicants like us" as you put it above. Why should medical school be any different? The process is actually no different except for the financial part. Instead of getting paid, you are going to be the one doing the paying. :eek:

Choose the schools that make the most sense for you to apply to based on whatever criteria you feel is necessary. I promise you that "friendly" or "non-friendly" makes little difference in your choices. Things like curriculum, parking, affordability and location, should be the criteria by which you chose a medical school. This is not a "dangle a toe in the water process" where you meekly pray that a school will take you. You are not asking for a "hand-out" from these places, you are choosing a professional school that will enhance your career.

What do you bring to medicine? Why would you be a good student for said school? What's on your resume? How can THIS school enhance YOUR career? You are choosing to spend thousands of dollars in your tuition money along with your precious time and energy to consume a product here. You are going to accentuate them in the process here because they are in the business of turning out good physicians and you want to be a part of that process.

Back in 1997, when I applied to medical school (and believe me, I was much older than you), not once did the thought of "friendliness" or "unfriendliness" wind up on my list of things to consider. Location was of paramount interest for me. My next factor was curriculum (at that time, I preferred a classical curriculum). Other factors were location in an urban environment (I am not interested in being in the middle of nowhere for any reason) and ease of commute. (If you have to struggle in traffic 2 hours each day with classes starting at 8AM and ending at 5pm, you are NOT going to have much time to digest your lecture materials). I wanted urban for public transportation or small city, with no more than a 15-minute commute if I was going to be driving).

You are offering your money and you bring your talents (as outlined in your application) to the schools that you will apply to. Things like "friendliness" really don't matter too much in the equation because the major "friend" that you will become acquainted with is that huge volume of material that you are going to have to master. Your main focus should be "what does this school have in place that will promote my success in navigating the curriculum?"

What difference does it make if you become the oldest person that they graduate (as long as you do well and graduate)? In short, don't rule any school out or in because of age alone because that material in medical school doesn't care about your age, sex, race, ethnicity, marital status, children, income etc. It's the same material and you are going to have to master it to become a physician.

If I could do it at age 45 back in the dark ages of 1997, then anyone can do the same in 2007. Figure out what you want and then figure out what you need to do to get it.

Now, break over and back to studing for my surgical boards!
 

QofQuimica

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I loved this QUOTE!!! Given some of your other posts, I have this vision of Einstein in a tiger striped shirt doing a keg stand. Too funny!! :laugh: :love:
:laugh: I look nothing like Einstein, but thanks anyway....I think. :p

njbmd said:
Now, break over and back to studing for my surgical boards!
njbmd! I'm so glad you're back. We missed you! When do you take the boards? Good luck. :)
 

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That's a point, and that's something I've hit with my school. I'm just not interested in most of the socializing that occurs. I had this problem at work, too, though, and have noticed that lots of my friends from college feel similarly about wherever they're at. I think it's hard (especially in the south) to be a 30 some-odd year old person without kids. All the "adult" socializing seems to focus around families and kids, and all the "young people" socializing seems to be about getting wasted at big parties.

In MED school even traditional students are still getting wasted at big parties? :hardy: I find that surprising!

I'd think they would be too busy keeping their heads above water academically.:wow:

Cheers,

Scrubs Junkie
 

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In MED school even traditional students are still getting wasted at big parties? :hardy: I find that surprising!

I'd think they would be too busy keeping their heads above water academically.:wow:

Cheers,

Scrubs Junkie
You might think that, but you'd think wrong, at least during M1 and M2. I can't speak yet for the clinical years. :p
 

Law2Doc

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In MED school even traditional students are still getting wasted at big parties? :hardy: I find that surprising!

The parties are far less frequent -- often relegated to post-exam blasts, or perhaps the first weekend after an exam. Nothing like undergrad. But then again the student body in med school is largely not the hardcore partiers you knew in undergrad anyhow.
 
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