Non-trads: Why after all these years...

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
Non-trads: What is the one thing, that finally caused you to make up your mind, and start the arduous journey of becoming a doctor, after all these years?

After all the hard work, there is no guarantee that you will matriculate and if you do, you also have the great possibility of having to pack up and relocate to an unknown or undesirable location not once, but possibly twice, because there's med school but afterwards you'll probably match somewhere completely different. Then there is no guarantee of what specialty you will match in.

Many of you have impressive careers, money, comfort, status and are consciously walking away from it all, only to start over again, and duke it out for a coveted matriculate seat. Even those of you who don't have careers or money, we're ALL older now.

What is it specifically about medicine, after all these years that have passed in our lives, that's making you do this now? Also, do tell what prevented you from starting the premed pilgrimage sooner.

Was it self doubt; bad company; finances; wrong advice; lack of exposure or guidance? Or did you always know that you wanted to practice medicine, but there were things that prevented you from doing so? There are no wrong answers here.

I have no regrets, but I see that there are a lot of med schools that matriculate high achieving high school students, through special programs such as Med Start. Where if you keep a certain grade point average through college, you're guaranteed admission. Wow! That was the furthest thing from my mind back in high school. Becoming a doctor at 25/26 years old, that's amazing. I never knew these kinds of programs existed. I would not have taken advantage of them anyway :rolleyes: .

I didn't have that mind set way back then, I just wanted to make a quick buck. Due to lack of exposure to medicine, wrong advice/guidance, and wanting to much too soon, I just wasn't there :sleep: . I'm not blaming anyone, I but I had no PASSION for anything, until I was exposed to the fascinating world of medicine. This didn't happen until I got married (26). After the births of my children (4) & (18 months), I was hooked. I really tried to escape this burning desire, after all, I'm looking at about 12 years before I can fully practice, not to mention the excessive debt to pay off, and that's if I get it right the first time. But I just couldn't fight it any longer. So here I am (31) starting all over, and I feel darn good about it.

Anyone please reflect and share.:) :) :)
 

PB2464

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2007
122
0
201
  1. Attending Physician
I agree about being misinformed and not having the correct guidance. This lack of guidance came from both my high school counselors and college academic advisers. I graduated with a 3.36 in Bio, did not take the MCAT, and totally gave up because I thought my grades were not high enough. I had never considered a DO school or getting a Masters to strengthen my grades. I got my first job after college and never looked back. Here I am, seven years later, learning about others' success stories and how they did it. What a surprise!
My stepbrother graduated salutatorian of his high school and participated in a MedStart program. He had to keep a 3.25 GPA and was guaranteed into Saint Louis Univ Med School. He is now in his first year of residency at 27 yrs old. I graduated 9th in my high school out of 450. Why was I never informed of such program?
Anyway, here I am, 29 yrs old, more mature and better prepared to take on my med school challenge.
 

Captain Fantastic

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2005
1,754
17
211
Mizzou Med
Three things:

1) Exposure
2) Courage
3) Financial

I had some exposure to medicine that convinced me I would enjoy the profession. I finally grew some stones a decided to take the risk. My wife started working so I felt had the ability to quit my engineering job to pursue the dream. (I am going into debt for this, but I didn't feel I could finance the kids' pre-school tuition, car payments, and a mortgage on student loans alone.)
 
About the Ads

Krisss17

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2007
716
2
0
In btwn here and there!
  1. Other Health Professions Student
Three things:

1) Exposure
2) Courage
3) Financial

I had some exposure to medicine that convinced me I would enjoy the profession. I finally grew some stones a decided to take the risk. My wife started working so I felt had the ability to quit my engineering job to pursue the dream. (I am going into debt for this, but I didn't feel I could finance the kids' pre-school tuition, car payments, and a mortgage on student loans alone.)

Captain Fantastic, I think you pretty much nailed it. Having worked in medical facilities for numerous years, I had originally though of pursuing nursing...but I find myself more leaning towards the medical model which deals with the diagnostic side, versus the nursing model which only deals with the patient's response to their illness. I totally respect nurses and I think that they have to put up with a lot of cr^&(p, but I'm still drawn towards medicine.

Another thing I would answer to your list is timing ... it was not my time to go to medicine straight from high school, I wasn't mature enough to understand that when people behave a certain way, it may have nothing to do with you. I do know that since I am not as young as many students pursuing medicine and won't be able to do some residencies that require more time (i.e. surgery), I still can excel at being a good primary care physician/family doctor. I think that my age will actually hep when dealing with some of my older patients, and the truth is...the majority of patients in the hospital nowadays are over 65.

Krisss17
 

OncoCaP

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 28, 2006
2,016
3
0
Houston, Texas
  1. Medical Student
I'm religious, and for me going into medicine is following a calling. On a secular level, it's an opportunity to serve in an area where there is a big and increasing need. I also enjoy the kind of work involved and the environment. I like the responsibility of being a physician and having a tangible result to my efforts. Yes, there are easier jobs that pay well, but for me life is not about finding the most leisurely path through life.
 

4theanimals

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2006
154
0
0
Fort Collins, CO
  1. Veterinary Student
Okay, again coming from the vet med side but...

I quite frankly don't remember my exact high school GPA (;) ) but it was certainly in the high 3.0 in an honors program. I was accepted into my local Cal State and UC. I chose to go to the Cal State because it cost less - nobody suggested otherwise. My first quarter I took Cell Biology and got a D. I thought that was it. I couldn't possibly make it medicine with a D in Biology. There was no advice or direction for me so I floundered on...now what and finally dropped out. Flash forward 15 years. I'm working as a paralegal in the IT industry and facing the second layoff of my career. And began to wonder why I was working so hard for "the man" when I never got anything back. Why not put that drive and determination into something that would make me happy? I decided to take one Biology course and see how it went. I got an A and the rest as they say is history. I'll be in my early 40s when I finish vet school. I should get at least a good 20 years in a job I love. Rather than 20 years doing something I'm good at but leaves me with no feeling of satisfaction.
 

soonereng

Double Trouble
10+ Year Member
Oct 13, 2006
1,286
2
201
where the wind comes sweeping down the plains
  1. Attending Physician
I'm religious, and for me going into medicine is following a calling. On a secular level, it's an opportunity to serve in an area where there is a big and increasing need. I also enjoy the kind of work involved and the environment. I like the responsibility of being a physician and having a tangible result to my efforts. Yes, there are easier jobs that pay well, but for me life is not about finding the most leisurely path through life.

My reason is similar to OncoCap's....I just woke up one morning, decided I wanted more out of my career than a paycheck, and decided to go to medical school.
 

southpawcannon

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 15, 2006
296
10
161
  1. Pre-Medical
Reasons for being held back from pursuing medicine earlier

1. No guidance, parental or academic.

2. Immaturity, not focused. Easily distracted by family problems and personal problems.

3. The worry of doing bad in the beginning possibly ruining my chances of "getting in."

Reasons for wanting to pursue medicine now

1. Experienced my field and although interesting to a degree, still very limited in what I can do. I seek more knowledge and want to make executive decisions regarding someone's care(next to the patient him/herself), rather than having to ok it with someone else all the time.

2. More mature and focused(=better decision-making) due to being older and having had real-world experience. Matured during the latter years of UG where I did much better with GPA, but nothing close to the maturity that one gains by working a full-time job and having more responsbilities than what you can gain by living in a dorm room going to class when you want.

3. Same as when I was younger: the challenge
 

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
Thank you so much, to all of you for sharing your stories with me. I guess I just wanted sort of a confirmation that I wasn't crazy to pursue this, at this point in my life. It means so much more to connect to people with similar backgrounds. There is not one of you, whose story I can't personally relate to, in one way or another. I think being older is certainly an asset for medicine. I know that I shouldn't do this, but I am guilty of looking back, and thinking of what I could've done differently, but I finally have closure in knowing that the hand that I had been dealt as far as my life and past choices, did not allow me to even fathom the thought of becoming a doctor. I will no longer look back.

PB2464: I totally agree with you, on the amount of misinformation out there that causes people to give up too soon and go down the wrong path, but you got back on the right path, and you are a better person for it, nothing can beat life experience. That's pretty awesome about your stepbrother participating in MedStart! Thanks for sharing.:luck:

Captain Fantastic: Yes indeed, it takes courage to dream and to hope. There are people that will despise you for dreaming big. I've been suffocated by small minded people, blissfully content with living mediocre lifestyles! You need courage to say, I'm not going to live this way. I've learned that people will always talk about you, no matter what you do, you WILL get talked about, so you might as well do you as you wish, because these same people will be your biggest fans when your done. Oh yes, quality preschool is so expensive, it was cheaper for me to stay home with two little ones. It's wonderful that your wife is willing to pick up the slack while you go to school, that's how you get things done, "teamwork", it's just part of the delayed gratification process. Thanks for sharing.:luck:

Kisss17: You mentioned timing, you couldn't be more right. Everything is timing, isn't it? I really had to come to terms with this very issue. I had to get rid of my gotta have it right now mentality, which has cost me even more time, in the long run. Haste makes waste. When it's your time, it's your time, period. Time is of the essence, so you when get your chance you have to grab it before it flees. Here's to Carpe' Diem (Seize the Day)! Thanks for sharing.:luck:

OncoCaP: Well said. I think medicine is a calling for me to. I am not religious but I am very spiritual. I agree with you, there are so many easier paths that you can take. My friend does PR and makes 160,000 a year with B.A. She thinks I am crazy for wanting to be a doctor, then laughed and said most doctors cant afford her fees :laugh: . She insisted that I "shadow" with her to see if it was something that I would like. Lets see, it's very glamorous, you meet a lot of celebrities, get to be part of the in crowd and wear nice designer clothes. But at the end of the day, I felt empty, I felt like my brain was mush, and there was no fulfillment in it for me, whatsoever. I hate to use the word shallow, but I can't think of a better word. Don't get me wrong, PR is important, she even does PR for some high profile Doctors, but no way. No flippin' way. Thanks for sharing.:luck:

4theanimals: There are no sides, we're all family. Here we go again, I see that you were given bad info too. I did the secretary thing for a while, I wasn't a legal secretary, where I live they make a killing. At 18, I got a "job" as a reservationist at a 5 star hotel, my folks thought I had hit the lottery with that job. Day after frickin day, stuck in a half cubicle, answering the never ending phone, and typing non-stop the same repetitive info, smoking, non smoking, etc, and not being able to move from my confines until break, I just couldn't do it. Oh my gosh, it hurts my brain at the thought of it. The woman that trained me had been there for 17 years and wouldn't have it any other way, she loved it. After a year, I got an A+ review and top tier raise of .25, then I was told to keep up the good work for there was more where that came from. You said that you'll have about 20 years to practice, that's only if you want. My Dermatologist is 83, she sold her practice and works with one of her protégé's part time, but she is the best, period. I've been seeing her since I was 12, and she still hasn't lost her Russian accent :laugh: . She has F.A.A.P. certification, I asked her what this meant, she wont tell me until I make it to med school, but she did say she almost lost her husband trying to attain it.:laugh: Thanks for sharing.:luck:

soonereng: I can totally relate. Living for a paycheck got old really quick with me too. I was happy to stay at home with my children, but when it was time for me to go back to work I found out that I could no longer do it. My doctors made a difference in my life, they truly care about me and my family, and it shows. I was forever changed by these positive experiences, so here I am. I want to help others, just as I have been helped. There is no better feeling than that. Thanks for sharing.:luck:

southpawcannon: Easily distracted by family and personal problems, was my number one issue. My entire life just seemed to be consumed with family problems. It was ALWAYS about them and their issues, and how they were going to manipulate me, whether it be time, money, etc., it was always about them, from as far back as my mind can remember. Sadly enough, nothing much has changed, but I have changed, and I had to pull away, especially now that I have my own family to care for. You are absolutely right, nothing beats real-world experience. Thanks for sharing.:luck:

I wish all of us the best, on our divine journey to becoming the best doctors the world has ever seen!
 

4theanimals

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 21, 2006
154
0
0
Fort Collins, CO
  1. Veterinary Student
?DreamsRMadeOf - I definitely know I can work longer...just being conservative. The veterinarian I admire the most "retired" and now is the full time vet at the shelter. He's in his mid-60s and is no where near slowing down. I imagine that is how I will be, but who knows?!
 

sketcham

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2006
18
0
0
  1. Pre-Medical
Off the subject, but your derm is FAAP? I thought that was a Fellow of the American Association of Pediatrics. You know...like FACOG is a Fellow of the American College of OB/GYN's? I might be wrong.....
 

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
Off the subject, but your derm is FAAP? I thought that was a Fellow of the American Association of Pediatrics. You know...like FACOG is a Fellow of the American College of OB/GYN's? I might be wrong.....

Yes, you are right! I am a complete novice where this issue is concerned. I don't know whether or not she is a dermatologist and a full pediatrician or just a pediatric derm. By the way, there are only 135 pediatric derms in the US and I think there are only 11 fellowship programs that offer this sub-specialty. But the initials behind her name are MD, F.A.A.P. She was shocked when I asked her about it, in all of her years of practice, no one has ever asked her.

I am determined to hear her story, she's a fascinating woman. She told me about some of her life, having to take care of sick family members, her husband and children, while working and going to school, and how most nights she only got 2-3 hours sleep. Her journey was a hard one, especially as a woman, but she told me that I must go to medical school, because her life was the most rewarding life she could have ever dreamed of. After all the struggle, the payoff was priceless. Before I could even ask, she said, "you are certainly not too old"; why is it that people in their 30/40's think they're old? She also told me that her friend just opened her own practice at 57 years old, she had just finished her residency at 53! That same day I went to the university and sought advise from an admissions counselor, thus starting my journey.
 

Orthodoc40

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 21, 2005
3,039
24
211
Between Michigan & Massachusetts
  1. Medical Student
I am determined to hear her story, she's a fascinating woman. She told me about some of her life, having to take care of sick family members, her husband and children, while working and going to school, and how most nights she only got 2-3 hours sleep. Her journey was a hard one, especially as a woman, but she told me that I must go to medical school, because her life was the most rewarding life she could have ever dreamed of. After all the struggle, the payoff was priceless. Before I could even ask, she said, "you are certainly not too old"; why is it that people in their 30/40's think they're old? She also told me that her friend just opened her own practice at 57 years old, she had just finished her residency at 53! That same day I went to the university and sought advise from an admissions counselor, thus starting my journey.

Oh boy - you just made my day! Maybe even my week. Thanks for that.
:D And good luck! :luck:
 
Sep 4, 2006
34,959
14,761
326
The Other Side of the Portal
  1. Attending Physician
Off the subject, but your derm is FAAP? I thought that was a Fellow of the American Association of Pediatrics. You know...like FACOG is a Fellow of the American College of OB/GYN's? I might be wrong.....

For the record, F.A.A.P. stands for American Academy of Pediatrics. It is not a certification, but rather implies dues-paying membership in an organization that one joins voluntarily. The Academy unites pediatricians throughout the Americas, dedicating its resources to professional education, advocacy for children, and public education. To qualify for membership, one must have initial Board cerification from the American Board of Pediatrics.
 

dia009

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 23, 2007
91
1
0
  1. Pre-Medical
didn't have a greencard when i first went into college at 18. chances are slim to none in getting into med school without citizenship.
believed people when they said it is soooo difficult.. well.. hell. i'm graduating summa or mag cum laude from ucla and i hardly tries at school.. which is slightly embarassing, but i spend most of my time cooking, looking at nutrition books, at my mom's acupuncture clinic.. and sleeping.
now i have a greencard, will be citizen in another year and a half.
i'm a 4th year undergrad. social science: communication studies major
decided better now than later. i just turned 22.
so i'm still young.
my mom said the other day, finally decided? i thought it's about time.
also, i absolutely HATE HATE HATE the media and hollywood.. which is my major related work.
it digusts me to the core.
i cannot spend my life doing p.r for some useless shirt that sells for 150 dollars or mel gibson.
my major is a super blond/greek major. they all DREAM of hollywood. gah!
i'm also no good with corporate politics
i'm good at doing my thing. so, i'm going to do my thing now.
 

scgirl722

New Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2007
5
0
0
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
ahahaha im in the same boat.. did entertainment all throughout college.. i just graduated but im retaking science classes at a local jc. i hate entertainment. us weekly is good enough for me!
 

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
For the record, F.A.A.P. stands for American Academy of Pediatrics. It is not a certification, but rather implies dues-paying membership in an organization that one joins voluntarily. The Academy unites pediatricians throughout the Americas, dedicating its resources to professional education, advocacy for children, and public education. To qualify for membership, one must have initial Board cerification from the American Board of Pediatrics.

Thanks for the clarification! ;) Wow! This means she's a dermatologist and a pediatrician. However, I'm really not surprised, this woman knows her stuff. :thumbup:
 

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
4theanimals: I wish you the best, your going to make an awesome vet! We need you now! I love animals too. I found a couple of cute bunnies living under my deck :love: . One morning I woke up to 4 big hawks on the railing trying to prey on them; not in my yard! I've got a whole ecosystem back there :laugh:

Orthodoc40: You have made my week! If you felt anything like I felt that day, and I got to play a small hand in that, then that makes me feel wonderful :) . I will tell you a little more of her journey. She never finished high school, married young, had 4 children, was a dedicated wife and mother for over 20 years. After all the children finished college and moved out, dear hubby, ups and leaves her. Amidst this devastation, she has never worked outside of the home and would soon have to fend for herself. This valiant woman had to go back and finish her high school diploma/GED! I'm thinking she had to have been in her early 40's, and while I don't have all of the details, the end result is her own practice at 57! Thank you and good luck to you too.:luck:

dia009: You are a pretty amazing young lady. Magna or Summa from UCLA?; at 22 years old; are you kidding me?; by which you hardly try! You are truly gifted to do something more than PR! At 22, let's see, I must be getting up there in age, lol! At 22, I was selling insurance and annuities, and believe it or not, this was worst than PR :laugh: .

I love the analogy that you use, for PR :laugh:. I couldn't agree with you more! I have my own little name, I'm sure I picked it up from somewhere, but I call them the "shiny set" . Shiny hair, shiny lip gloss, shiny nails, shiny jewelry, shiny shoes, shiny car, etc. Sadly, I am a former participant of this group, ;) . While there is nothing wrong with getting excited during Fashion Week, this is ALL these people live for! I was told that a better term to describe this lifestyle is "plastic".

Anyway, I wish I had your scruples at such a young age. At your age, I was still trying to fit in, and appease to everyone, except me. Your Mom has her own acupuncture clinic; NICE. I can see where your instinct to pursue medicine derives from. Many people prefer acupuncture treatment as opposed to traditional treatment which usually involves taking medication.
By the way, welcome to SDN, I feel funny saying this, for I have been on here for a New York minute myself.

I am flattered that you chose this thread for your first post! I hope you will continue to contribute to SDN, your story is fascinating. I'm glad that you are doing your own thing. Your going to be an amazing doctor! Thanks for sharing. :luck:

scgirl722: Welcome to SDN, I'm so flattered that you chose this thread for your first post (assuming you did the intro thread)! My congrats to you on graduating college, and then going back, to take your science pre reqs. You are also an amazing young lady. I'll be honest, standing up to that superficial lifestyle is NOT easy. It just isn't. There has to be something deeper, in your heart, mind, spirit that will not allow you to be content with this, and if you don't follow it you will have little or no peace. As for US Weekly, that's cool. I used to buy (not subscribe) every women's magazine on the rack, lol. I'm glad that phase passed. I hope you continue to contribute to SDN. You are also going to be an amazing doctor! Thanks for sharing. :luck:

Gooble: Thank you for pointing out the gross error in the title of my thread! I feel awful, I certainly was not trying to exclude anyone from contributing to this thread. I'm so happy that dia009 and scgirl722 shared their stories, yes they are young, but both of these young women are wise, well beyond their years. They both have accomplished a lot, and it was rewarding for me (and I'm sure many others) to read their stories, and identify with them, in spite of our age difference. :thumbup:
 

oldpro

MS IV
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 3, 2006
1,619
9
0
Somewhere in the Colon (Any rotation)
  1. Medical Student
Well, I took a different road then many here, I went to the Caribbean for Medschool, I was an RN for about 18 years now and just started looking at about 32 and I was having some mariatal problems and had to put it off, then a divorce and I ended up trying to get myself back together, well by 38 I did and then I looked at the possibility of going to get the MD and it seemed like would be almost 50 before I could do it so I thought long and hard and since I wanted to be an FP it seemed like if I really wanted to the Caribbean would work for that, I found that what I had already done was good enough for the Caribbean schools so I applied and was accepted and started at 41. It has been tough and I study a lot but I think in the end it's worth it. I do not recommend this route for most since there are difficulties, but as I have seen we all face different sets of hurdles I'm comfortable with mine and so is my wife and 3 children.

I finish Basic Science in 1 month so I can't wait to get this part over and look to the USMLE, if I do well I will be 45 when I graduate, really not that bad........................................:luck:
 

?DreamsRMadeOf

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2006
683
0
0
In Your Dreams
Well, I took a different road then many here, I went to the Caribbean for Medschool, I was an RN for about 18 years now and just started looking at about 32 and I was having some mariatal problems and had to put it off, then a divorce and I ended up trying to get myself back together, well by 38 I did and then I looked at the possibility of going to get the MD and it seemed like would be almost 50 before I could do it so I thought long and hard and since I wanted to be an FP it seemed like if I really wanted to the Caribbean would work for that, I found that what I had already done was good enough for the Caribbean schools so I applied and was accepted and started at 41. It has been tough and I study a lot but I think in the end it's worth it. I do not recommend this route for most since there are difficulties, but as I have seen we all face different sets of hurdles I'm comfortable with mine and so is my wife and 3 children.

I finish Basic Science in 1 month so I can't wait to get this part over and look to the USMLE, if I do well I will be 45 when I graduate, really not that bad........................................:luck:


Old Pro: What an amazing, inspiring story! You're right, your journey is unlike any other, but I certainly can relate to you on a personal level. I adore people who overcome. You know, going through something like a divorce leaves a lot of people drained and bitter. Whenever you have the ability to turn pain into progress, there is nothing that is impossible to you. You will no doubt be a world class doctor! To go through so much, and then to reinvent yourself, then going over to the Carribbean, took a lot of tenacity. I LOVE :love: the Carribean.

It's been awhile, since I've had children, vacation has been cut down to once a year, to Disney World no less. Anyway, I'm longing for - sugar apple, guava, mango, pineapple, conch, grouper, and my favorite - coconut milk right out of the coconut, sunny blue skies, clear blue water and powder white sand. I wont even start on the Barcardi :rolleyes:. Good times indeed.

I know that it can be hard sometimes, missing your wife and children, but they support you, and heck yeah :thumbup: , the payoff is priceless! What you are doing for yourself and your family is a testament to your dedication, not only to them, but to everyone, that you will come across in your profession, as a doctor.

My OB is the best, truly annoited to do what he is doing. He told me about his life. He lived over in Korea for almost ten years, he served in the Peace Corp on Koje Island, then went to medical school in Korea (Yonsei University)! When he returned to the States, he completed internship, then residency. Afterwards, he started a very lucrative and successful practice, and is also a Site Director of the OB ward at the hospital. He told me all this while I was in labor :laugh: , the early stage of course, after the epidural!

My OB was supposed to leave for vacation, but my baby was taking it's time ;) , I mean 40 weeks had passed, already! I was miserable, it was HOT that summer, 113 degrees! But anyway, I thought he was going to go ahead and leave, but he put his vacation on hold, just to deliver my baby. That meant the world to me, for he had delivered my first child. Plus I was able to address any concerns to him directly, without having to go through the nurse or triage.

Anyway, I'm so glad that you shared your fascinating story! You need to come on back, we need good doctors, like you :) .
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 14 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.