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Anyone familiar with this program? I hear they just recently merged, and will become a teaching hospital affiliated with the new Hofstra School of Medicine. They have 20 categorical + 20 prelim spots per yr. Surprisingly there were almost no FMGs even in the categorical program. Undergoing a lot of curriculum changes too
 

jbz24

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From what I've heard, NS/LIJ is the strongest IM program outside of Columbia, MSSM, Cornell, NYU, Montefiore, although they may lose some applicants to the Manhattan community programs due to its location being on Long Island. Not sure about the FMG part, but they certainly do take DO students. Like you said, it seems they're making a push to become more of an academic institution, but it remains to be seen how their recent merger plus their affiliation with Hofstra will play out in terms of their reputation.
 
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Do you know how "intense" their IM program is? From what I heard it wasn't too bad at all, and residents seemed happy, and not burned out/bitter.
 

jbz24

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Sorry I don't, hopefully a resident can comment.
 

Doc Martins

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Bumping because I'm interested in hearing about what current residents think about the program. Thanks!
 
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would love to hear more about the NSLIJ program. anyone know if they have a nightfloat system or if they are q4 overnight?
 

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At this point on both Frieda and ERAS (2010-2011 cycle), this program is still listed as a university-affiliated program with Albert Einstein. Has anyone heard of whether or not this status will change with their merger with Hofstra SOM?
 

Doc Martins

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At this point on both Frieda and ERAS (2010-2011 cycle), this program is still listed as a university-affiliated program with Albert Einstein. Has anyone heard of whether or not this status will change with their merger with Hofstra SOM?
Frieda and ERAS haven't updated yet, it should be changed to Hofstra affiliation. I remember getting an email regarding this change sent to my class a few weeks ago.
 
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Yes, I got the same message from my Dean. They are the official teaching hospital for Hofstra School of Medicine, so I guess that means they are an official university program now. I've heard some good things about their schedule which supposedly got creative and is more resident friendly than other places. the program and the school are both trying to be new and innovative. But other than that I don't know. If I get an offered an interview then i guess i'll find out more. i think eras and frieda aren't updated yet so it's still listed as aecom.
 
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I'm not quite sure what North Shore - LIJ is getting out of the deal with Hofstra to be honest. I think there used to be a law in effect in NYS that a medical school needed to be part of a university. I think this is the reason why there are no stand-alone medical schools in NYS, but I could be wrong.

But Hofstra is a more regionally focused university, and not even for the entire NY metropolitan area at that. I suppose that the 50/50 deal means that the hospital system will control what happens. But I don't think the Hofstra affiliation for its medical school will offer any advantage, and for people that (stupidly) only look at things like ranking, may hurt them. Even though nothing has changed with the hospital!

I guess we'll all see.
 

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hello all, I am a 3rd year med resident at NSLIJ and i wanted to give you guys my thoughts on the program. I really do thinks it is an excellent program in terms of teaching, experience, training, independence, research, and in obtaining fellowship. when i started as an intern this program was two different programs (north shore and LIJ) and now it is one program so i am able to give my thoughts and compare the differences.

the merger in my opinion has only strengthened the program in positive ways. it took the two strong points of both programs and eliminated the negatives. this was mostly done with residents inputs. we had lots of meetings as residents, during the merger and the faculty asked us what we wanted to do and they were very receptive with our opinions.

The schedule is hands down much better than any of the programs in the city (having rotated at most of them as a med student and having colleges from med school doing residency there) there is almost no overnight call, even in the MICU (nightfloat) call days on the floor you almost always leave at 9 (later early on in the year when interns are new) the faculty is very academic and teaches a lot, very friendly and accessible, there is always someone to help if you are unsure about something (something that i thought lacks in city programs).

You rotate at both North Shore University hospital and LIJ. the facilities are renovated, there is a new wing being built at north shore and a new building being built at LIJ. fellowships are available in every specialty of medicine and they are LARGE and over half of them are in house candidates (cardiology - 9 spots / yr, GI - 4 spots/yr, heme/onc, 4-5 spots, ID 3-4, pulm/cc 4 spots, allergy/immunology, rheum, palliative care, endo, geri, nephrology) however many people did not go into fellowship not because they did not get it but because they CHOSE to go into mostly hospitalist medicine (in my class) however the class applying this year is very specialty oriented and very strong and will all match very well. North Shore LIJ just bought out Lenox Hill and those fellowship spots may also be favored (but dont hold me to that)

There are currently about 50 r2's and r3's and about 65 interns (prelim + cat) from the last match of the 65 interns there were no FMG's and 3-4 DO's (all VERY strong); the intern class is very strong and will only get stronger in my opinion given how great the program is.

If you are interested in going to a great medicine residency that will prepare you to be a great attending or get the fellowship of your choice, without the congestion and the scut you will find in NYC, its a great great great program. only 30 mins to NYC, its the HIGHEST paying residency in the country plus you get subsidized housing and a meal allowance!

I would suggest you apply and find out yourself how great the program is on interview day.. it sells itself...
 

pakijiga

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btw i am not a future chief i have nothing to gain by putting up the prior post, i have already matched in fellowship.. i just wanted potential applicants to have a first hand view on my experience during the application process.
 

tictaq

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thank you for the info!
 

PeachyKeen22

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Thanks pakijiga!! Your perspective was really helpful! I am really interested! =) I do have another question- you mentioned subsidized housing in your post, but I actually live in Queens and would prefer just living in my house. Are there people who commute and do they find it convenient?
 

theneh

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Queens is no nig deal. The hospital is just off I-495 exit 34 New Hyde Park. If you live in the most western part of Queens, like Astoria, it may take you up to 30-45 min to get home at night (traffic). Geting in will be a breeze, early in the morning.
 

pakijiga

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we have residents who live all over including manhattan, brooklyn, queens, and suffolk. its right off the LIE so its not so bad, by the time you have to come in the morning (usually around 7am) there isnt much traffic.
 

Cirrus83

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Thanks pakijiga!! Your perspective was really helpful! I am really interested! =) I do have another question- you mentioned subsidized housing in your post, but I actually live in Queens and would prefer just living in my house. Are there people who commute and do they find it convenient?
The reverse commute into LI from Queens is usually a breeze. I used to do this commute regularly and traffic was always great in the mornings. I actually think it was worse coming back in the evenings. What will probably be more annoying than the highway commute is just getting to the highway-so your commute will usually be very short and predictable if you're near the highways in Queens since driving stoplight to stoplight to get to the highway can take up your time. If you live close to a highway though it's a great commute, particularly if you live in the eastern portion of Queens. Flushing, Whitestone, Bayside, etc.
The only time it'd probably be an issue is if you're on some kind of schedule where you're synced up with the commute into NYC.
 
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I interviewed at NSLIJ or Hofstra NSLIJ or whatever its called. Loved it and will rank it #1 - happy residents, very reasonable and creative schedule, new medical school and recent merger makes it definately appealing. the interview day was the best i've been to by far and i've interviewed at almost 20 places. the PD gave a very thorough and sincere overview that had me sold from the get go. the rest of the day with meeting residents just confirmed what she said. i think it will only get more competitive with time and i hope i get in now. that being said, i'm a pretty solid student and have done quite well in school. i just don't want to be at some ivy malignant place in the city where i'll be miserable. the program in long island seems like a great mix of solid academics, up and coming curriculum, and friendly atmosphere. good luck to all:)
 
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I interviewed at NSLIJ or Hofstra NSLIJ or whatever its called. Loved it and will rank it #1 - happy residents, very reasonable and creative schedule, new medical school and recent merger makes it definately appealing. the interview day was the best i've been to by far and i've interviewed at almost 20 places. the PD gave a very thorough and sincere overview that had me sold from the get go. the rest of the day with meeting residents just confirmed what she said. i think it will only get more competitive with time and i hope i get in now. that being said, i'm a pretty solid student and have done quite well in school. i just don't want to be at some ivy malignant place in the city where i'll be miserable. the program in long island seems like a great mix of solid academics, up and coming curriculum, and friendly atmosphere. good luck to all:)
 
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hi pakijiga
i m an IMG from Pakistan .I am very much interested to apply for the NSLIJ IM residency program .in order to strengthen my cv i m also doing a research at NSUH .i just want to know realistically what are my chances in this program .my scores are 87 and 99,step1 and step2,flunked cs first time and took it the second time,awaiting result,graduated back in 2005.i really like this program .how can i get in ?PLzzzz do reply .thanks a bunch
 

DocInProgress

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There are currently about 50 r2's and r3's and about 65 interns (prelim + cat) from the last match of the 65 interns there were no FMG's and 3-4 DO's (all VERY strong); the intern class is very strong and will only get stronger in my opinion given how great the program is.
.
do they accept COMLEX?
 
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fuzzywuz

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Can anyone comment on the competitiveness of getting into this program?
 
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Bump. I would like to know more about this program please!

The general info is located on their website, and I've spoken to a few residents who are placed there, but they gave generic answers for the most part. They seemed very happy as well.

Is it a competitive match? Is it well perceived among NY residencies? I know they are vying to be 'on par' with NYU, Cornell, Columbia, and Monte (the big guns) but how realistic is this goal?

THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR ANY INSIGHT SDU CAN OFFER!
 

gutonc

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Not realistic at all!
It's realistic that they could be at the (clinical) level of Monte but not the others. And they will likely never be at the same level as those other programs in terms of research...Hofstra is not a research university.
 
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infarct

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Is it a competitive match? Is it well perceived among NY residencies? I know they are vying to be 'on par' with NYU, Cornell, Columbia, and Monte (the big guns) but how realistic is this goal?

THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR ANY INSIGHT SDU CAN OFFER!
well perceived? sorta
on par w/ the aforementioned "big guns": no
on par in the future?: maybe, probably not
 
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does anyone know where to report and where to park?

i only received the confirmation that says to report at 7:30am to LIJ

thanks!
 

d1ony5u5

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Hey, I'm reviving this thread because I just matched here and would like to get some info from residents or anyone knowledgeable.
In particular, I'm interested in:

1. Do most residents have a car?

2. How does the on-campus housing work? Is it very popular with interns? Do you get the stipend for off-campus housing only if you go through the lottery and fail to get a spot?

3. What are some recommended areas to live? (My personal preference would be to have easy access to the city to enjoy as much of the social life there as possible, but any recs are welcome!)
 

anbuitachi

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I think most people have a car... unless you are willing to commute by bus. Since i believe sometimes you go to LIJ, sometimes NS, and the distance between them is significant.


I'm also interested in the status of NS LIJ IM program. This thread is pretty outdated now so if anyone currently in the program has anything to say about it that'd be great. Reason I'm wondering is i've talked to several attendings, and their views on the program are mixed. The director of cardiology at my school still believes that NS is a weak IM program and is below programs like NYMC, ds, stony, since NS is still only a 'university program' by name, but in reality it's more like a community program... And from what I heard, NS treats their Hofstra students extremely well, but not as well to their IM residents. I had a couple of students rotate thru NS IM, and said it wasn't pleasant. So can any residents in the program provide more info? Thanks
 

d1ony5u5

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Thanks Anbuitachi! any other info would be very appreciated...


Since I haven't worked there yet, I have no real footing to give you any updates about the status of the program.
I do have some information I used in making my rank list, which might give an idea:

Placement:
For 2013 out of 31 graduating residents (excluding chiefs), 10 went into practice (7 in NYC area, with 5 staying at NS-LIJ).
The rest matched into fellowships. 3 in P/CCM (NYU, 2 at NS/LIJ), 5 in cardio (4 at NS/LIJ, NYH of Queens), 1 in GI at NS/LIJ, 1 in Heme/Onc at NS/LIJ, 4 in nephrology (2 at NS/LIJ, NYU and Yale), 1 in endocrine at MSSM, 2 in allergy/immuno at NS/LIJ, 1 in ID at NS/LIJ, 1 in palliative at NS/LIJ, 1 in occupational at Yale. 90% matched in their first 2 choices, what ever that may mean.

For 2012, out of 35 graduating residents (excluding chiefs), 11 went into practice (6 in NYC area, with 5 staying at NS-LIJ).
The rest matched into fellowships except for 1 who went to do research at Cleveland Clinic. 3 in P/CCM (NYU, Monte, NS/LIJ), 6 in cardio (2 at NS/LIJ, 1 at NYH of Queens, 3 at random programs), 1 in GI at NS/LIJ, 3 in Heme/Onc (at Hopkins, Columbia and MSSM), 2 in nephrology at NS/LIJ, 1 in endocrine at NS/LIJ, 1 in ID at NS/LIJ, 2 in palliative at NS/LIJ, 1 in geriatrics at NS/LIJ, 1 in hepatology at NIH. 100% matched in their first 2 choices.

For 2011, out of 34 graduating residents (excluding chiefs), 12 went into practice (9 in NYC area, with 6 staying at NS-LIJ).
The rest matched into fellowships except for 1 who went to do a pathology residency at MSSM. 4 in cardio (1 at NS/LIJ, Columbia, Brown and University of Buffalo), 1 in GI at NS/LIJ, 3 in Heme/Onc (at MD Anderson, UCSD, Yale), 2 in nephrology (at NS/LIJ, and U of Chicago), 2 in endocrine (at NS/LIJ and Beth Israel Deaconess), 1 in rheum at Stony Brook, 3 in palliative at NS/LIJ, 3 in Allergy and Immuno at NS/LIJ, Cincinanati Children's Hospital and MSSM. 90% matched in their first 2 choices.

In 2011 there were 7 chiefs, in 2012 there were 6 and in 2013 there were 5. In 2011 they matched into P/CCM at MSSM, Allergy and Immuno at NS/LIJ, endocrine at NYU, and cardio (2 at NS/LIJ and Brown). In 2012 they matched into P/CCM at NS/LIJ, heme/onc at NS/LIJ and Tufts, Geriatrics at Cornell, Endocrine at NS/LIJ, one became a hospitatlist at NS/LIJ. I don't have data for 2013.

People interpret these differently, but in my view it shows it's a solid program, with ~2/3 of the classes sub specializing. This is on par with most non-elite university programs. There is a clear preference to stay within the system for most sub specialties, which I'm guessing has to do with preference of the PDs to reserve the spots for internal applicants (I've been told ~1/2 of the spots are reserved). Whether that is good depends on the sub specialty in question, as the strength will vary by program. Of those that go outside the system, it seems they go to programs in reputed institutions for the most part. A little less than 1/2 of the class goes into competitive specialties (Cardio, GI, P/CCM) which is somewhat reassuring. My assessment is that in terms of outcomes as seen in placement, NS/LIJ does a pretty decent job. I guess one thing that I don't have the data to look at, is how many of these graduates go on to more academic careers after fellowship. That's a measure that can be used to determine the status of a program. I think that while NS/LIJ might not be considered a heavy academic program, it does quite well in practical terms (placement). What an individual graduate does after fellowship, seems to me, is a lot more dependent on the individual, less on the program where he/she trained. So NS/LIJ is pretty good at getting you to a point where you can decide what you want to do.
 

anbuitachi

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not bad! though im interested in GI at the moment, and 1 per year.. ouch.
 

d1ony5u5

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Yeah, I forgot to mention that, but GI is very weak in the placement. Cardio and P/CCM seem a lot better by comparison. It's kind of strange. You should definitely consider that when ranking.
I don't think I would have ranked the program as high if I had the slightest interest in GI.

Hopefully some other people will give their perspectives on the program
 

sylvanthus

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Hey, I'm reviving this thread because I just matched here and would like to get some info from residents or anyone knowledgeable.
In particular, I'm interested in:

1. Do most residents have a car?

2. How does the on-campus housing work? Is it very popular with interns? Do you get the stipend for off-campus housing only if you go through the lottery and fail to get a spot?

3. What are some recommended areas to live? (My personal preference would be to have easy access to the city to enjoy as much of the social life there as possible, but any recs are welcome!)
1) Yes
2) Apply to the lottery system, seems about 30-50% or so get a spot. No idea on the 2nd part.
3) People live all over the place, some in the city, some closeby, some further east on long island.
 

Cirrus83

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I'm too lazy to go look through the other stuff but the fellowship match info for 2013 is definitely not correct for heme-onc since well more than 1 person went into it, the numbers are a little funny for last year because a chief went into heme onc here, along with 2 residents and I forget who went elsewhere-either way it's definitely not just one person. With the latest match we had 6 people total go into heme-onc, with 4 people staying here (one a chief resident), one person going to NYU, and one going to Yale. In all fairness the 2012 class where the 3 applicants went to Hopkins, Columbia and MSSM was kind of a weird year since 2 of the applicants had PhDs so the match list doesn't usually look that amazing. I think I've learned over the years that the match list just as much reflects who the people applying that year happen to be, some years just by coincidence you get all superstars applying with tons of research and PhDs and some years you get people who just decided to go into a field applying. And I've seen pretty average residents get lucky and scramble into really great programs at random too, so you never know what will happen.
 
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good things and bad things about the program:
Good: ancillary staff, icu attendings at LIJ are very good very cutting edge, there's an international elective now where you can go to uganda as a third year. Most people are chill, residents get along very well. Call schedule used to be good but has changed recently.
Con: all notes are handwritten, even senior residents write chart review notes on every pt every day, this wastes hours of time and is horrendously frustrating, to the point where people I know have dropped out of the program after 1st year. Lots of private attendings-too many privates-no learning value taking care of their pt, they don't round or teach and they call their own private subspecialists to manage pts. Faculty-very very few like to teach, the major focus is on getting notes done properly to maximize billing, very little emphasis on learning, a lot of them are not up to date with evidence based medicine, practice very defensive medicine and not only won't they teach but they'll teach outdated or inaccurate medicine.
 

NYUyankeezfan

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Does anybody know if all of the Northwell (the new name for North Shore-LIJ) internal medicine programs are connected? Do the programs require an audition rotation during 4th year??
 

Cirrus83

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good things and bad things about the program:
Good: ancillary staff, icu attendings at LIJ are very good very cutting edge, there's an international elective now where you can go to uganda as a third year. Most people are chill, residents get along very well. Call schedule used to be good but has changed recently.
Con: all notes are handwritten, even senior residents write chart review notes on every pt every day, this wastes hours of time and is horrendously frustrating, to the point where people I know have dropped out of the program after 1st year. Lots of private attendings-too many privates-no learning value taking care of their pt, they don't round or teach and they call their own private subspecialists to manage pts. Faculty-very very few like to teach, the major focus is on getting notes done properly to maximize billing, very little emphasis on learning, a lot of them are not up to date with evidence based medicine, practice very defensive medicine and not only won't they teach but they'll teach outdated or inaccurate medicine.
Honestly I trained there and originally the chart review notes were only at the NS site and not at LIJ but IIRC some chief residents came up with the idea of making it required at all sites. To be fair this was because of a couple bad apple senior residents who were plain not seeing patients and making the interns do all the work. But honestly the chart review notes are not required to be full notes anyway, just a small paragraph with updates and corrections to the intern's note and frankly making sure that someone is chart checking late in the day actually does improve care. I don't think it really added much more than a minute or two per chart check to write a little paragraph with updates labs and plans. It would be nice if electronic notes were possible but the current EMR setup can't yet handle that kind of workload as I'm sure you know.

Also, the LIJ ICU attendings and the NS attendings are now combined into one big pool so they cross over between the sites.

Honestly I wouldn't let chart check notes decide where you do residency. I'm not saying you should do residency at Northwell but honestly you're not always on inpatient floors. I also don't recall having an excessive amount of private attendings but this can be dependent on your team assignment so some people might end up with more patients with community staff than others but this is still a minority of the time and there is the benefit that you tend to have more independence on admissions with these physicians early on.

Teaching can be pretty variable though depending on the attending and part of the problem is that the attendings are saddled with administrative overhead that means they be at a meeting the times that residents are free. That said the program does seem to try to improve things all the time, and there's a new program director now.
 

Cirrus83

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Does anybody know if all of the Northwell (the new name for North Shore-LIJ) internal medicine programs are connected? Do the programs require an audition rotation during 4th year??
An audition is not required at all, but obviously if you kick ass during a rotation it will factor in because the attendings will tell them that you're awesome. Of course if you do the rotation and you are a ****ty person that can work against you as well so don't be a terrible person if you do a 4th year rotation.

Also, the North Shore Manhasset and LIJ sites are one large program but they are not connected significantly to the other sites like Forest Hills or Lenox Hill, etc which are run independently. There is some slight crossover because the residents at those sites will sometimes do their specialty electives at the main campus if it's not available in their hospital but this is very rare.

I have no idea what the name of the residency is anymore with all these name changes lol.
 
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Anyone familiar with this program? I hear they just recently merged, and will become a teaching hospital affiliated with the new Hofstra School of Medicine. They have 20 categorical + 20 prelim spots per yr. Surprisingly there were almost no FMGs even in the categorical program. Undergoing a lot of curriculum changes too
Hi, sorry for my ignorance, but what are FMGs?
 

MeatTornado

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What Step 1 score is competitive for a DO?
I had heard that this program was trying to phase out DOs and looking at their list of residents confirms that no DOs have matched there in the last two years.

Also I stand corrected that this program's official name is now in fact 'Hofstra Northwell'.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile app
 

TripleOpIMXD

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I did not know this thread existed. Just had some earlier questions I posted elsewhere that didn't get answered, so I'll post it here:

1) How likely are you match there with below average board scores (STEP 1 210-220, STEP 2 230-240)? Or do you have to have average or above average to have a chance?

2) Do you feel the number of private patients there hindered your learning experience?

3) For those going into hospitalist after graduation, how were the hospitalist job opportunities to stay at Northshore or nearby in Long Island?

Thanks!
 

NewYorkDoctors

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I did not know this thread existed. Just had some earlier questions I posted elsewhere that didn't get answered, so I'll post it here:

1) How likely are you match there with below average board scores (STEP 1 210-220, STEP 2 230-240)? Or do you have to have average or above average to have a chance?

2) Do you feel the number of private patients there hindered your learning experience?

3) For those going into hospitalist after graduation, how were the hospitalist job opportunities to stay at Northshore or nearby in Long Island?

Thanks!
The usual categorical interns who enter are from Downstate, Einstein with a smaller representation from Zucker SOM (their own med school), NYU, and maybe NYPHWCMC, and then smattering from a variety of other out of state med schools that are mid tier and above average tiered.

The majority of residents seem to do 230s average step 1 and 250s average step 2. Dont have official stats. Though some less than reputable chief residents in the past had had borderline failing Step 1s and eventually became chief resident and is now an interventional cardiology fellow.

Just beware, the nepotism and cronyism is strong in this program.

Otherwise it's a up and coming top academic program. It is still in that transition phase from community-affiliated program to being a full fledged university program. With their med school up since 2008 now and improving quaternary services (ECMO controlled by pulmonary, renal transplant available, cardiac transplant/TAVR/midCAB etc all up and coming, just to name a few), this place will be a force to be reckoned with in the coming years.

In Internal Medicine privates are part of the deal. The hospital's medicine service is way too large for the medicine residents to cover it all (especially since it is two hospitals). Further without a true step down unit, med-tele with the sick CHF, COPD, sepsis, CKD patients all go to residents who are the "higher level of care."

Often many sick patients end up on the NP/PA medicine service with the private internist. It's "great learning" for the ICU rotation because you will be consulted to evaluate the deteriorating patient! Somewhat tongue in cheek, I will say this is great education!

The program recently made changes such that if housestaff cover the private internists, only a PGY3 can lead the team. This allows the PGY2 to work with hospitalist first to hone skills and then have a chance as PGY3 to act as de-facto hospitalist for the private internist. The benefits of the private internist is that they tend to text/cell phone call their own buddies for consultation so fewer phone calls for you.

They use full EMR now btw.

And the hospitalist/nocturnist program is expanding in all of Northwell. All graduates who have wanted a hospitalist job have gotten one with the desired accomodations within Northwell. The need to phase out the PMD/hospitalist private model is what has led to the impetus to hiring more home grown hospitalists from within the health system.

But don't expect a big salary.
$175K for day hospitalist
$220K maybe for night hospitalist
When starting off.

And it's not 14 on 14 off. It's more like work 20 days or so for it.
But great ancillary services so you can find a side PMD gig if you'd like. And if youre not on the teaching service, you can really get some bread and butter IM cases that the resident service seldom gets.


For anyone who matches here: it is a great program. But to be most successful (get the top fellowship you want and then enter academia with them or elsewhere or to get a ridiculously high paying private practice job), it's more than being a top resident. Also you need to brown-nose and play politics like never before. It's not a malignant program at all. It's just the sign of the times in that IM residency teaches you to be a hospitalist, not an internist. Therefore, you need to be all in with all of the hospital/government policies and administrative tasks that promote maximal RVU growth and quick discharges... that stuff comes first. To get top learning, do a fellowship.




Source: insider.
 
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TripleOpIMXD

2+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2017
22
4
1
Status
Medical Student
The usual categorical interns who enter are from Downstate, Einstein with a smaller representation from Zucker SOM (their own med school), NYU, and maybe NYPHWCMC, and then smattering from a variety of other out of state med schools that are mid tier and above average tiered.

The majority of residents seem to do 230s average step 1 and 250s average step 2. Dont have official stats. Though some less than reputable chief residents in the past had had borderline failing Step 1s and eventually became chief resident and is now an interventional cardiology fellow.

Just beware, the nepotism and cronyism is strong in this program.

Otherwise it's a up and coming top academic program. It is still in that transition phase from community-affiliated program to being a full fledged university program. With their med school up since 2008 now and improving quaternary services (ECMO controlled by pulmonary, renal transplant available, cardiac transplant/TAVR/midCAB etc all up and coming, just to name a few), this place will be a force to be reckoned with in the coming years.

In Internal Medicine privates are part of the deal. The hospital's medicine service is way too large for the medicine residents to cover it all (especially since it is two hospitals). Further without a true step down unit, med-tele with the sick CHF, COPD, sepsis, CKD patients all go to residents who are the "higher level of care."

Often many sick patients end up on the NP/PA medicine service with the private internist. It's "great learning" for the ICU rotation because you will be consulted to evaluate the deteriorating patient! Somewhat tongue in cheek, I will say this is great education!

The program recently made changes such that if housestaff cover the private internists, only a PGY3 can lead the team. This allows the PGY2 to work with hospitalist first to hone skills and then have a chance as PGY3 to act as de-facto hospitalist for the private internist. The benefits of the private internist is that they tend to text/cell phone call their own buddies for consultation so fewer phone calls for you.

They use full EMR now btw.

And the hospitalist/nocturnist program is expanding in all of Northwell. All graduates who have wanted a hospitalist job have gotten one with the desired accomodations within Northwell. The need to phase out the PMD/hospitalist private model is what has led to the impetus to hiring more home grown hospitalists from within the health system.

But don't expect a big salary.
$175K for day hospitalist
$220K maybe for night hospitalist
When starting off.

And it's not 14 on 14 off. It's more like work 20 days or so for it.
But great ancillary services so you can find a side PMD gig if you'd like. And if youre not on the teaching service, you can really get some bread and butter IM cases that the resident service seldom gets.


For anyone who matches here: it is a great program. But to be most successful (get the top fellowship you want and then enter academia with them or elsewhere or to get a ridiculously high paying private practice job), it's more than being a top resident. Also you need to brown-nose and play politics like never before. It's not a malignant program at all. It's just the sign of the times in that IM residency teaches you to be a hospitalist, not an internist. Therefore, you need to be all in with all of the hospital/government policies and administrative tasks that promote maximal RVU growth and quick discharges... that stuff comes first. To get top learning, do a fellowship.




Source: insider.
Definitely appreciate this post. Did not know about the political nature of this program. Thank you for explaining and giving realistic post graduate opportunities for fellowship/hospitalist.
 

NewYorkDoctors

5+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2012
486
115
131
Thanks for this super informative post. May I ask you to elaborate on "nepotism" and "cronyism"? Do they discourage people from going for competitive specialties like GI?
Cardiology there is quite guilty of nepotism and brown nosing over quality doctoring and publications .

GI is very selective as any place but usually the chief residents get the two internal slots and then they get the two others from other academic programs with great pedigree and research .

So essentially if you are going to be a resident there and want to get GI internally either but pray no chief residents from the class above you want to do GI or prepare to go elsewhere. Or become a chief resident . How to become a chief resident ? Throw out board scores or letters or anything of academic merit . Become the biggest cheerleader of the program , attend as many administrative meetings as you can , Brown nose , demonstrate good leadership (early discharged and not being too buddy buddy with your coresidents and show a bossy side to yourself) and go to all social events after hours . Being smart? That’s a cherry on top . Let’s just say not all chief residents on the last few years have been stellar to the point the AI , GI and cards departments have overtly told the chief Reaident they’ve accepted they are only there because the chief of medicine wants them there

But back to the IM program , it’s scut light (notes and social work activity are ubiquitous even as an attending so cannot call that scut) . Plus the outpatient general IM program is top notch in many respects . It’s a true ptient centered medical home and have the resources to take Care of most GIM issues yourself . Fellows clinic referrals are also easy to get .
 
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