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North Shore-LIJ Neurology

Discussion in 'Neurology' started by CNSDOC, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. CNSDOC

    CNSDOC Junior Member

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    Hello all. I know that some of you will be interviewing at North Shore-LIJ for neurology. As I am currently a PGY-3 resident in the program, I would be glad to answer any questions that you have concerning the program or the interview process. Please feel free to post. :)
     
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  3. drssr

    drssr Member
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    hi there!my doubts about the program are-
    1.on the sf match site it has been refferd to as the Aecom NSLIJ program.do the residents rotate at montefiore?if so for how long?
    2.out of the two,NS and LIJ,where do the residents rotate more often during the three years?
    2.this might sound silly,but i was also wondering,when residents graduate how would their certificate read?would it say Aecom NSLIJ or just NSLIJ?I know this is a silly q and would absolutely understand it if you were unable to answer it! :) the point i am trying to make is ,how big does the affiliation with AECOM affect the program and its residents?
    i would really appreciate it if you could answer my questions.coz there arent that many who seem to know!
     
  4. CNSDOC

    CNSDOC Junior Member

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    drssr,

    In reference to your first question, yes residents do rotate through Montefiore and this may be from 1 to 2 months. You have the option of doing electives in all four years and you will have the opportunity to do them at Montefiore. Since this is primarily a North Shore-LIJ program, the number of non-elective rotations at Montefiore are being generally decreased.

    As for your second question, the responsibilities of the residents for the two hospitals will be split fairly evenly. One person may have any extra month at North Shore or LIJ, but it will all even out as the residents progresses through the residency.

    As for the third question, it would say North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System on the certificate since Albert Einstein College of Medicine has it's own program and Montefiore is their major teaching affiliate. If you were to go the Einstein program I imagine it would say "Albert Einstein College of Medicine-Montefiore Medical Center".
     
  5. drssr

    drssr Member
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    hey!thanks a lot for the input.it really helped especially since it was from the horse's mouth!again,thank you! :)
     
  6. bluegold

    bluegold Member
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    CNS DOC,

    I was wondering if you could comment on the competetiveness of the program. Specifically with regard to taking DO applicants, and whether the USMLE is required, if not what sort of COMLEX scores are you looking for? In addition I was interested in the academics of the program, are there reseach oppertunities available? Finally I was wondering if you could take me through a typical day.

    Thanks for making yourself available...
     
  7. CNSDOC

    CNSDOC Junior Member

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    Bluegold,

    North Shore-LIJ is a fairly competitive program. The program will interview approximately 150 to 200 candidates for 7 available positions. Dr. Kanner, the program director, accepts both COMLEX and USMLE scores. He has fixed cut off scores for both USMLE and COMLEX for giving out interviews. He recognizes the fact that there are inherent differences between the two exams so he sets the cutoff score for COMLEX at 60th percentile. The cutoff score for the USMLE is 80th percentile.

    However, you should realize that the COMLEX and USMLE are not the "be-all and end-all" of getting an interview. If you have done a clerkship in neurology either at North Shore or LIJ and Dr. Kanner wants to recruit you, you will get an interview as long as your scores are reasonable. Additionally if you have worked at one of the big name hospitals and you have an outstanding letter of recommendation from a neurologist, that will also put you closer to getting an interview.

    The program is also very DO friendly. We have several DOs in the program in various stages of training, all of whom are NYCOM grads. The current Chief Resident at North Shore is a DO and is a NYCOM grad. The program is also very friendly to foreign grads. As long as you're qualified it does not matter whether you have an MD or DO or whether you got your medical degree in the US or outside. The program director/chairman himself is a foreign grad (University of Madrid), the vice-chairman of neurology at North Shore is a foreign grad (MGM Medical College in India).

    A typical day at North Shore, would be something like this.

    7:00 to 8:00 - Morning Report
    8:30 to 9:30- Grand Rounds (if it's Friday)/Neuroradiology rounds (if it's Monday) or Residents go see their patients
    9:30 to 10:30- Residents work on the floor
    9:00 to 12:00- Residents with outpatient clinic on Tuesdays report to the clinic. If resident does not have clinic, resident continues to work on floor
    10:30 to 11:30- Teaching rounds with floor attending
    11:00 to 12:00- Teaching Rounds with Dr. Kanner (on Fridays only)
    12:00 to 1:00- Noon Lecture/Professor's Rounds with Dr. Kanner (every other Wednesday)/Journal Club with Dr. Murthy (alternating with Professor's Rounds on Wednesdays). If no lecture, we just go to lunch!
    12:00 to 3:00- Residents with outpatient clinic on Thursdays report to the clinic. If resident does not have clinic, then continue with floor work)
    1:00 to 2:00- Neuropathology/brain cutting (one wednesday every month)
    3:00 to 4:00- Neuromuscular Disease rounds with Dr. Murthy
    4:00 to 4:30- Sign out to person on call.

    There are usually 3 juniors and 1 senior on the floor every month. During your floor months, you may be asked to do a consult in the ER anytime during the day from 10:30 to 4:00. The consult resident (a second year neuro resident) is responsible for handling all in-house consults (i.e., from patients who are already on the floors somewhere in the hospital and need a neurology consult) as well as ER consults from 7AM to 10:30AM (this is done in order to free up the floor team to round on their patients and to write notes)

    If you're on-call, then you get to stay the night! We do not have night float. The good news is that on average the first years have 5 calls per month (i.e. you're pretty much q7 :thumbup: ). On-call days can be tough as you are responsible for all consults (ER and floor). We do not have a buddy system for the call, however your senior is only a page away should you need him/her. Additionally, all patients that you do consults on are discussed with the attending. During a typical call at North Shore, you can get an average of 5 to 6 consults per night. However it can be as good as no consults to as bad 15 consults or more. There is no cap on how many consults you do. However, if you feel like you're getting overwhelmed (yes, this can happen) you can always call your senior to come and help you out. When you're post-call, you have to leave the hospital by 10AM. Dr. Kanner is very gung ho about the Bell Commission regulations and he follows them to the letter. So..essentially you have your post-call day off! :) During your post call day, the senior on the floor will take care of your patients during the day, however you have to make sure you wrote notes on all your patients before you leave the hospital.

    Electives: First years get 2 selectives (neurorads or neuropath). Seniors obviously get more :)
    Vacation: Two 2 week segements, (may be back to back if arranged with chief resident).
    Research: Everyone must complete research project in order to finish the residency.
     
  8. bluegold

    bluegold Member
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    CNSDOC,

    Thank you so much for that reply!!
     
  9. bluegold

    bluegold Member
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    Just one (well two) more quick question if I may. Do residents have time for outside interests, family etc? Also could you comment on where graduates of the program go, do the majority choose fellowships or enter private practice?

    Thanks again for any input...
     
  10. bluegold

    bluegold Member
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    Just one (well two) more quick question if I may. Do residents have time for outside interests, family etc? Also could you comment on where graduates of the program go, do the majority choose fellowships or enter private practice?

    Thanks again for any input...
     
  11. CNSDOC

    CNSDOC Junior Member

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    Bluegold,

    Like in any residency, family life usually gets the short end of the stick. However, I've found that most of us have a fairly good family life despite the fact that we're in residency. Most of us are married, quite a few of us have kids and I think we have plenty of time to spend with our familes. Living in the on-campus housing makes having a family life that much easier (not to mention, it's dirt cheap to live in the housing because for a 2 bedroom the rent is approximately $850 and that includes everything except the phone bill). If you have kids who are older (those needing day care), there is an on-campus day care program. Additionally the salary is quite good as well (one of the highest in the country). To put it in two simple words, we're happy!

    As far as what to do after residency, most of the graduates of this program go on to fellowships to various hospitals around the country. North Shore-LIJ also has it's own fellowships (EMG and EEG). Most of the graduates from last year went on to do electrophysiology (EMG) fellowships at the following institutions:

    1. University of Washington in St. Louis
    2. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    3. University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston
    4. North Shore University Hospital

    One graduate from last year went into private practice.

    This year's class will be going to the following places, some for electrophysiology others for stroke fellowships:

    1. Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine
    2. Columbia University/ The Neurological Institute
    3. Virginia Commonwealth University
    4. North Shore University Hospital
     
  12. islander

    islander Junior Member
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    I did a few months on LIJ Neurology and have some experience w/ LIJ Medical Center. This program is worthy of serious consideration for a number of reasons - very nice residents, strong faculty, diverse patient population, hospital administration extremely supportive of residents in general, excellent support services (nursing, ancillary staff), very good pay, etc. Most of all, Dr. Kanner is an awesome chairman - not a malevolent presence as are one or two of the other NYC area chairmen. Great atmosphere - Medicine and other services similarly friendly and good to work with.
     

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