BornToBeASurgeon

RIP Greg Plitt
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After reading about many of the cons of medicine, I still want to become a physician, mainly an Orthopedic surgeon. I know I know, before, I always thought Ortho or bust if I did end up going the med school route, but know I'll be happy in any surgical field. I don't know how to explain it, but I love going to the hospital and being in that environment. It feels like home for some weird reason. I've read up on many different careers in healthcare (Dentist, Physical Therapist, Physician Assistant, Pharmacist, Nursing, Podiatry), but I always find myself coming back to medicine/surgery. I want to be the person that people come to in their time of pain after they have used up all their other options for treatment (pt, shots, etc) and need someone that will get in there and do the dirty work.

I work at a chiropractic office right now and I'm in charge of the therapy room. Even though I'm not a big fan of chiropractic care, I like what I do because I do physical therapy on the patients after their spine adjustment with the chiropractor. I like physical therapy and don't mind the work, but it's just a little too long of a process for me. I want to fix up my patients right away.

I'm 23 y/o and won't be able to start med school until I'm 27 y/o. I'm currently at a community college. I had a 3.75 gpa in high school, but went to a community college because I wasn't really motivated for more schooling and didn't know what career to pursue. All my friends were going to college so I felt like it was something I had to do too. Because I wasn't really motivated for more school, I got bad grades in the first few years and my gpa is now a 3.0. I still haven't taken any of the medical school pre-req classes and got the bad grades in the general ed classes. From what I understand, after I transfer to a university my gpa starts at 4.0 again. Then whenever I graduate from the university and apply to med school, they will average out my gpa from cc and uc. I'll most likely have to do a post-bach program to get accepted into an allopathic school. I would probably be able to get into an osteopathic school w/o the post-bach, but MD's have a higher chance of getting accepted for surgical residencies compared to DO's.

I also want to get this out of the way right now. Money isn't the only or primary reason I want to go into medicine/surgery, but I'm not going to lie, it does play a part in my decision. I won't be a practicing physician and be making real money until I'm around 36-37 y/o. Not to mention all the debt I'll have at that age. How long would it take to pay off all the debt and break even? What do you think will happen with physician salaries 10-15 years from now? Do you think medicine will be worth it for me at my age.

Sorry for the long rant. I just wanted to give you folks a clear idea of where I'm at. Please let me know if you need more information. If you can help me out in any way, I'll really appreciate it. Thank you for your time.
 

DO2015CA

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If you can do anything else that will make you happy do that. If not then go to medschool easy as that, although ortho is very competitive and any surgery is somewhat competitive so you aren't guaranteed to matching those. Surgeons don't have a hard time paying off their loans if they manage their money correctly. My suggestion is start taking the pre reqs and see how you do in those.
 
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After reading about many of the cons of medicine, I still want to become a physician, mainly an Orthopedic surgeon. I know I know, before, I always thought Ortho or bust if I did end up going the med school route, but know I'll be happy in any surgical field. I don't know how to explain it, but I love going to the hospital and being in that environment. It feels like home for some weird reason. I've read up on many different careers in healthcare (Dentist, Physical Therapist, Physician Assistant, Pharmacist, Nursing, Podiatry), but I always find myself coming back to medicine/surgery. I want to be the person that people come to in their time of pain after they have used up all their other options for treatment (pt, shots, etc) and need someone that will get in there and do the dirty work.

I work at a chiropractic office right now and I'm in charge of the therapy room. Even though I'm not a big fan of chiropractic care, I like what I do because I do physical therapy on the patients after their spine adjustment with the chiropractor. I like physical therapy and don't mind the work, but it's just a little too long of a process for me. I want to fix up my patients right away.

I'm 23 y/o and won't be able to start med school until I'm 27 y/o. I'm currently at a community college. I had a 3.75 gpa in high school, but went to a community college because I wasn't really motivated for more schooling and didn't know what career to pursue. All my friends were going to college so I felt like it was something I had to do too. Because I wasn't really motivated for more school, I got bad grades in the first few years and my gpa is now a 3.0. I still haven't taken any of the medical school pre-req classes and got the bad grades in the general ed classes. From what I understand, after I transfer to a university my gpa starts at 4.0 again. Then whenever I graduate from the university and apply to med school, they will average out my gpa from cc and uc. I'll most likely have to do a post-bach program to get accepted into an allopathic school. I would probably be able to get into an osteopathic school w/o the post-bach, but MD's have a higher chance of getting accepted for surgical residencies compared to DO's.

I also want to get this out of the way right now. Money isn't the only or primary reason I want to go into medicine/surgery, but I'm not going to lie, it does play a part in my decision. I won't be a practicing physician and be making real money until I'm around 36-37 y/o. Not to mention all the debt I'll have at that age. How long would it take to pay off all the debt and break even? What do you think will happen with physician salaries 10-15 years from now? Do you think medicine will be worth it for me at my age.

Sorry for the long rant. I just wanted to give you folks a clear idea of where I'm at. Please let me know if you need more information. If you can help me out in any way, I'll really appreciate it. Thank you for your time.
I would say keep your GPA in the above a 3.0, aim for around a 3.3, but do awesome on your MCAT and apply to DO schools, and then see where you go, Orthopedic Surgery isn't the only way to make money.
 

Dr. Death

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Also be sure to mention that you are surgery or bust in your secondaries and interviews. It is pretty hard to guess how long it will take you to pay off your loans without knowing what school you would be attending (anywhere from 25k to 55k per year tuition) Also what specialty you match in (anywhere from 180 to 400 k per year salary) You aren't significantly older than most matriculants (about 25) so there is that. And anyone who can forecast physician salaries in 10-15 years shouldn't be on this site, they should be buying powerball tickets. I would assume they will be roughly the same.
 
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you might not wanna be a doctor in 4 years. People change their minds sometimes. Pose the Q as the date comes nearer.
 
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I hope you know that most people who match ortho and such already had a strong background prior to medical school and they kept strengthening it to build their case. In other words they came in with a plan and an affinity for the field which is also backed up by a stellar CV. It is a truly competitive process. Also, it is a common occurrence for medical students to decide against surgery after their 3rd year rotations and it has little to do with intelligence or academic performance.
 

Cardboard101

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Assuming you matriculate @ 27.
Medical school = 4 years. If you have 0 cash and need to borrow you can get 4% rates, lower with a cosigner. 4 years @ 85k a year is 340k. Best case scenario and loans are deferred until after you finish residency you'd have a little over 340k debt when you're done. If you make some payments using your residency, maybe knock it down to 300k realistically. General surgeons come out making in the 210-280k range, orthopedic, more. Earmark 110k of that for loans, you're paid back within 3 years while still pulling ~50-80k salary.

27 + 4 + 5 years residency + 3 years repayment = 39 when you're debt free. On the bright side, after that and with another few years of experience you'll start pulling 300k+ salary.

If you're boning for orthopedic surgery, best chance would be MD. Its a very competitive specialty. You're actually fortunate you haven't taken the premed courses yet. Some post-baccs strictly accept people who have not. They're called career changers. Many of them have linkages to multiple med schools. Do well, 3.6+ gpa 80%+ MCAT coupled with decent ECs and you're chances of getting in somewhere are excellent.

As for physician salaries, people will always get sick, people will always need doctors.
 
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Mad Jack

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Surgery isn't exactly easy to match into. What you should ask yourself is, "If I can't become a surgeon, will I be happy having become a physician?" Lots of people are surgery or bust, and many of them bust. So ask yourself if the chance of those four years of your life going to simply becoming a physician will be enough for you if things don't pan out. This isn't to say you won't become a surgeon, but just that if you'd rather die than practice outside of surgery as a doctor, that's a serious factor you should consider with the match getting more and more competitive each year. Your age is fine- 27 is plenty young. Enjoy the years before medical school, as they'll be some of the last good ones you get for a while. The other thing is that you're so early in the process you might find that you hate the studying, you hate not being able to live your life, you hate grinding away in classrooms, and then the question will answer itself.
 
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If you're not 100% sure, then don't do it. It's as simple as that.
 
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I don't think anybody has really addressed how the need for surgeons will change over the next... 13 years.

Honestly, people (engineers and programmers, to be more specific) are working diligently to replace high-paying jobs such as medicine. This is very difficult for the parts of the interaction that involve human contact and intuition, and much more realistic for things such as surgery. In fact, many surgeries are already being done by machine. The people trained to do these things by hand will eventually become few and far between.

That said, people will be required to operate these new machines! These are likely to not always be doctors. If I were you and worried about timing, while being not the most enthusiastic student, I'd think about entering a shorter schooling program that would make me a technician or operator on these new mechanisms.

Best of luck :)
 

kinzav

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It's really hard to get ortho surg. If you feel like you know a couple people smarter than you, you might not be set for ortho surg (both confidence wise and intelligence wise lol). Exaggerating, but just echoing the sentiment that if you look at it as "I hope..." And not "I'm going to be..." You might not have the same strength of will and motivation that many ortho surg candidates do. Good luck with whatever you decide on.
 
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allantois

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I don't think anybody has really addressed how the need for surgeons will change over the next... 13 years.

Honestly, people (engineers and programmers, to be more specific) are working diligently to replace high-paying jobs such as medicine. This is very difficult for the parts of the interaction that involve human contact and intuition, and much more realistic for things such as surgery. In fact, many surgeries are already being done by machine. The people trained to do these things by hand will eventually become few and far between.

That said, people will be required to operate these new machines! These are likely to not always be doctors. If I were you and worried about timing, while being not the most enthusiastic student, I'd think about entering a shorter schooling program that would make me a technician or operator on these new mechanisms.

Best of luck :)
Too much sci-fi, anyone?

Cost of da Vinci is $2 mill. and the surgeon has to be in the room not only to operate the machine but in case he has to switch and do the surgery laparoscopically or in open.
 
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Too much sci-fi, anyone?

Cost of da Vinci is $2 mill. and the surgeon has to be in the room not only to operate the machine but in case he has to switch and do the surgery laparoscopically or in open.
I'm not saying the replacement is at hand, but in 13 years? Who knows.
 

StudyLater

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A surgeon would always operate the machines. Why the f*ck would any patient want to get operated on by a tech?
 
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A surgeon would always operate the machines. Why the f*ck would any patient want to get operated on by a tech?
I agree that a surgeon should always operate the machines. However I believe that may not always be the case, especially when cost differences become extreme.

Again, this isn't so much about right now as 5-10+ years in the future.
 
OP
BornToBeASurgeon

BornToBeASurgeon

RIP Greg Plitt
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Thanks for all the help so far guys. How much harder is it for a DO to get into a surgical field? The philosophy of osteopathic medicine appeals to me more than allopathic medicine, but more DO's go into family med from what I hear and that's not the route I want to go. I just want to say again that I would prefer ortho surgery, but I'm not ortho surgery or bust. I'll be happy to go into any surgical field, EM, PM&R, and Sports Med.
 
OP
BornToBeASurgeon

BornToBeASurgeon

RIP Greg Plitt
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Jan 3, 2015
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Pre-Medical
After reading about many of the cons of medicine, I still want to become a physician, mainly an Orthopedic surgeon. I know I know, before, I always thought Ortho or bust if I did end up going the med school route, but know I'll be happy in any surgical field. I don't know how to explain it, but I love going to the hospital and being in that environment. It feels like home for some weird reason. I've read up on many different careers in healthcare (Dentist, Physical Therapist, Physician Assistant, Pharmacist, Nursing, Podiatry), but I always find myself coming back to medicine/surgery. I want to be the person that people come to in their time of pain after they have used up all their other options for treatment (pt, shots, etc) and need someone that will get in there and do the dirty work.

I work at a chiropractic office right now and I'm in charge of the therapy room. Even though I'm not a big fan of chiropractic care, I like what I do because I do physical therapy on the patients after their spine adjustment with the chiropractor. I like physical therapy and don't mind the work, but it's just a little too long of a process for me. I want to fix up my patients right away.

I'm 23 y/o and won't be able to start med school until I'm 27 y/o. I'm currently at a community college. I had a 3.75 gpa in high school, but went to a community college because I wasn't really motivated for more schooling and didn't know what career to pursue. All my friends were going to college so I felt like it was something I had to do too. Because I wasn't really motivated for more school, I got bad grades in the first few years and my gpa is now a 3.0. I still haven't taken any of the medical school pre-req classes and got the bad grades in the general ed classes. From what I understand, after I transfer to a university my gpa starts at 4.0 again. Then whenever I graduate from the university and apply to med school, they will average out my gpa from cc and uc. I'll most likely have to do a post-bach program to get accepted into an allopathic school. I would probably be able to get into an osteopathic school w/o the post-bach, but MD's have a higher chance of getting accepted for surgical residencies compared to DO's.

I also want to get this out of the way right now. Money isn't the only or primary reason I want to go into medicine/surgery, but I'm not going to lie, it does play a part in my decision. I won't be a practicing physician and be making real money until I'm around 36-37 y/o. Not to mention all the debt I'll have at that age. How long would it take to pay off all the debt and break even? What do you think will happen with physician salaries 10-15 years from now? Do you think medicine will be worth it for me at my age.

Sorry for the long rant. I just wanted to give you folks a clear idea of where I'm at. Please let me know if you need more information. If you can help me out in any way, I'll really appreciate it. Thank you for your time.
 

Roxas

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Cutting is incredibly overrated. However, if you don't match ortho or gen surg a few people I know wanting surg have done OB/Gyn instead and seem relatively happy so far.
 
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I would say keep your GPA in the above a 3.0, aim for around a 3.3, but do awesome on your MCAT and apply to DO schools, and then see where you go, Orthopedic Surgery isn't the only way to make money.
But it's a nice way to get rich quicker in medicine ;)
 

Crayola227

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OMG, so much ignorance, so little time.

The fact that you mention having little zest for school and think going to uni will start your GPA at 4.0 or start it over?

1) if despite everything else in this post (the ones about being happy with an MD and doing family med if all goes wrong, and about the years and $340K in debt and not really starting your career until whenever) you still think you want medicine:

1) you need to learn to love school, as in, putting every ounce of energy you have into straight A's in a lot of the hardest math/science classes there are to take at university level, specifically you want A's in physics, gen chem, organic chem, calculus, statistics, plus minus certain amounts of genetics, statistics, biochem, all with associated lab time (think around 2 3hr sessions the whole school year)
2) straight A's in 2 years of foreign language
3) goal is science GPA between CC and uni (med schools will average ALL your grades) at 3.5, and GPA for all your credits around 3.7
4) you will take a cumulative test mostly on all of the physical and biological science you took in all of college, including ridiculously detailed chem questions, and a good deal of math, for which you need to do well
5) obtain good letters of rec from a hard science teacher and others
6) you already are doing some clinical related experience hours

You should be averaging school full time credits, and working part time, research, altruistic and volunteer hours, to be demonstrating averaging about 60 to 80 hrs per week while getting all A's and some B's

Getting the MD is at least 8 years total of school, a huge proportion of which will be 60-80 hrs per week of what many find the least enjoyable school situation: hardcore math/science straight A's B's at the 80 hr/wk mark

People who don't like school, studying, reading, or can't do it 60-80 hrs per week and do well on 4-8 hr tests, well, it's not for you.

7) spend 16 hours one of your free weekend days watching general and orthopedic surgery cases. There are documentaries and such where you could be watching enough 1-2 hour cases to fill the day. Not anything that's a lot of CGI or Morgan Freeman narrating, just straight body cam footage. Do it while standing the whole time. If you're not riveted, surgery is not for you. When you do this, only eat before and after this block of watching. You can only use the bathroom twice and in between cases, no pausing. If you're halway through a two hour case, you gotta hold it.
8) see if you can spend a day watching a general practitioner in clinic. If you cannot imagine managing to doing that at least 20 hours a week for the rest of your life, don't get an MD or DO.

You have to like reading about science, at the very least, like, a lot a lot a lot for this to be something to spend any time and $300K in debt towards.

School+science+A's+80-100hr workweeks×6-8yrs = medical career, which may not be in your field of choice or a surgical field as you have mentioned.

No ways around it
 

Crayola227

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Look in the MSAR but as I recall enough med schools had it as pre-req and enough unversities required it for Bachelor gen ed requirements that doing it seemed to open enough doors/not risk closing doors to just be a given

Definitely look at med school prereq's and your uni's requirements before taking my word on it

A lot of matriculated students end up with foreign language so I would recommend it
 
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Crayola227

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And aiming for A's in all your classes is just a given for all pre-meds, you can only get a 3.5-3.7 average in science/non-science by averaging more A's then B's
If you have a lot of B's and lower you have just that many A's and then some to make up for those

And not all A's in non-science classes are created equal
Upper division and foreign language definitely seen as more rigorous than psych 101
 
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1) you need to learn to love school, as in, putting every ounce of energy you have into straight A's in a lot of the hardest math/science classes there are to take at university level, specifically you want A's in physics, gen chem, organic chem, calculus, statistics, plus minus certain amounts of genetics, statistics, biochem, all with associated lab time (think around 2 3hr sessions the whole school year)
Is 6 hours/year really normal for a lab class? That seems like ridiculously little.

For Organic and BioChemistry we had 8 hours/week in lab, with similar amounts for most other lab-based classes.

Or did you mean credit hours, so 3 hours/week for each of 2 semesters? That still doesn't seem like very much.
 
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I'd also like to mention that, as much as surgery requires very good grades, it's also about being REALLY good with your hands. If you haven't taken your biology or anatomy pre-reqs yet, you probably haven't really had enough dissections to know where you stand in that regard.

If you end up with really exceptional grades/scores but without the necessary skill with your hands, you'd probably be more likely to fit in anesthesiology.
 

Crayola227

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Is 6 hours/year really normal for a lab class? That seems like ridiculously little.

For Organic and BioChemistry we had 8 hours/week in lab, with similar amounts for most other lab-based classes.

Or did you mean credit hours, so 3 hours/week for each of 2 semesters? That still doesn't seem like very much.
I was trying to be conservative in that regard.

I couldn't remember if it was 3 or 4 hour sessions, 1 or two times a week, I did so many classes with labs so many years overlapping.

It's a boatload of hours on science, a lot of people who like science in theory still don't like lab. That's really the point.

Gotta get your science and science lab on.
 
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Stephanopolous

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Assuming you matriculate @ 27.
Medical school = 4 years. If you have 0 cash and need to borrow you can get 4% rates, lower with a cosigner. 4 years @ 85k a year is 340k. Best case scenario and loans are deferred until after you finish residency you'd have a little over 340k debt when you're done. If you make some payments using your residency, maybe knock it down to 300k realistically. General surgeons come out making in the 210-280k range, orthopedic, more. Earmark 110k of that for loans, you're paid back within 3 years while still pulling ~50-80k salary.

27 + 4 + 5 years residency + 3 years repayment = 39 when you're debt free. On the bright side, after that and with another few years of experience you'll start pulling 300k+ salary.

If you're boning for orthopedic surgery, best chance would be MD. Its a very competitive specialty. You're actually fortunate you haven't taken the premed courses yet. Some post-baccs strictly accept people who have not. They're called career changers. Many of them have linkages to multiple med schools. Do well, 3.6+ gpa 80%+ MCAT coupled with decent ECs and you're chances of getting in somewhere are excellent.

As for physician salaries, people will always get sick, people will always need doctors.
Where can they get a 4% rate?
 

ChiTownBHawks

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Where can they get a 4% rate?
The federal government? I think I have a similar rate on my undergrad loans.
Oh, no the current unsubsidized fed rate is 5.84%.
Yes you're right. I have one loan at 4.66% and another at 3.4% but that's because they're both subsidized undergrad.
The current LOWEST rate a med student can get from the gov is 7.21%, which actually isn't a bad deal. But the fact that none of them are subsidized anymore is the real killer...
 

ChiTownBHawks

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After reading about many of the cons of medicine, I still want to become a physician, mainly an Orthopedic surgeon. I know I know, before, I always thought Ortho or bust if I did end up going the med school route, but know I'll be happy in any surgical field. I don't know how to explain it, but I love going to the hospital and being in that environment. It feels like home for some weird reason. I've read up on many different careers in healthcare (Dentist, Physical Therapist, Physician Assistant, Pharmacist, Nursing, Podiatry), but I always find myself coming back to medicine/surgery. I want to be the person that people come to in their time of pain after they have used up all their other options for treatment (pt, shots, etc) and need someone that will get in there and do the dirty work.

I work at a chiropractic office right now and I'm in charge of the therapy room. Even though I'm not a big fan of chiropractic care, I like what I do because I do physical therapy on the patients after their spine adjustment with the chiropractor. I like physical therapy and don't mind the work, but it's just a little too long of a process for me. I want to fix up my patients right away.

I'm 23 y/o and won't be able to start med school until I'm 27 y/o. I'm currently at a community college. I had a 3.75 gpa in high school, but went to a community college because I wasn't really motivated for more schooling and didn't know what career to pursue. All my friends were going to college so I felt like it was something I had to do too. Because I wasn't really motivated for more school, I got bad grades in the first few years and my gpa is now a 3.0. I still haven't taken any of the medical school pre-req classes and got the bad grades in the general ed classes. From what I understand, after I transfer to a university my gpa starts at 4.0 again. Then whenever I graduate from the university and apply to med school, they will average out my gpa from cc and uc. I'll most likely have to do a post-bach program to get accepted into an allopathic school. I would probably be able to get into an osteopathic school w/o the post-bach, but MD's have a higher chance of getting accepted for surgical residencies compared to DO's.

I also want to get this out of the way right now. Money isn't the only or primary reason I want to go into medicine/surgery, but I'm not going to lie, it does play a part in my decision. I won't be a practicing physician and be making real money until I'm around 36-37 y/o. Not to mention all the debt I'll have at that age. How long would it take to pay off all the debt and break even? What do you think will happen with physician salaries 10-15 years from now? Do you think medicine will be worth it for me at my age.

Sorry for the long rant. I just wanted to give you folks a clear idea of where I'm at. Please let me know if you need more information. If you can help me out in any way, I'll really appreciate it. Thank you for your time.
To answer your thread title: do NOT do it.

This is all I can see myself doing with my life and it's ****ing miserable
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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To answer your thread title: do NOT do it.

This is all I can see myself doing with my life and it's ****ing miserable
I personally always disliked when people try to claim this whole, don't do it if you can do something else or the whole do it only if you can't live without it. But after being in medical school, uprooting my life, and spending literally half of the last month nauseatingly stressed I can see why people say this. And mind you that for me the biggest hit wasn't adjusting to academics, but the fact that I'm without my boyfriend, without my friends, and without my family.

If you're complaining about trivial **** like being in your mid 30s when you start to practice then honestly go to PA school. 3 years and you can do half of what your FM doc does with a nice salary, no call, and no major oversight.

But again, go to college, see if it works out, and if you decide that you truly want to be a doctor then it's a very worthy career path.
 

IslandStyle808

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I personally always disliked when people try to claim this whole, don't do it if you can do something else or the whole do it only if you can't live without it. But after being in medical school, uprooting my life, and spending literally half of the last month nauseatingly stressed I can see why people say this. And mind you that for me the biggest hit wasn't adjusting to academics, but the fact that I'm without my boyfriend, without my friends, and without my family.

If you're complaining about trivial **** like being in your mid 30s when you start to practice then honestly go to PA school. 3 years and you can do half of what your FM doc does with a nice salary, no call, and no major oversight.

But again, go to college, see if it works out, and if you decide that you truly want to be a doctor then it's a very worthy career path.
I think there are definitely paths out there that will throw bad stuff at you, and they can be almost as bad or just as bad as med school. Even when I was in graduate school, there were moments that felt like hell because I screwed up an analysis or an experiment and had to start over. If you like something a lot, that 10% of enjoyable moments will get you through those 90% of painful moments. The main thing is to see how much you enjoy the field from speaking and shadowing physicians, get as much information as possible. Well, just take my post as conjecture.

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el_duderino

Some men play tennis, I erode the human soul
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I personally always disliked when people try to claim this whole, don't do it if you can do something else or the whole do it only if you can't live without it. But after being in medical school, uprooting my life, and spending literally half of the last month nauseatingly stressed I can see why people say this.
I'm only an MS2 and so much this. It starts hard and gets harder and stays that way for a long time. Don't try to do this if you could be happy doing something else. It's not worth it unless you simply have to do it. IMO.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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I think there are definitely paths out there that will throw bad stuff at you, and they can be almost as bad or just as bad as med school. Even when I was in graduate school, there were moments that felt like hell because I screwed up an analysis or an experiment and had to start over. If you like something a lot, that 10% of enjoyable moments will get you through those 90% of painful moments. The main thing is to see how much you enjoy the field from speaking and shadowing physicians. Well, just take my post as conjecture.

On a side note, are you a girl serenade? If so, I didn't realize this in the several years I have been on here! I apologize if I referred to you in the masculine tone.
And that's the truth. What we're going through in our schooling is manageable and certainly not the end of the world. We can and we will get through the hard parts.

And no, I'm not.
 
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IslandStyle808

Akuma residency or bust!
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And that's the truth. What we're going through in our schooling is manageable and certainly not the end of the world. We can and we will get through the hard parts.

And no, I'm not.
I apologize again
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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I'm only an MS2 and so much this. It starts hard and gets harder and stays that way for a long time. Don't try to do this if you could be happy doing something else. It's not worth it unless you simply have to do it. IMO.
Yah, I've talked to more than a few disgruntled second year students who seem like they'd much rather be fornicating a rusty saber than doing another week of Neuro.
 
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osteohack10

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Believe it, OP. S*** gets real, and fast.

On a side note, sounds like KCU has the first years in the deep end and moving fast. Best of luck @serenade and the rest of you guys - you got this.
 
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