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Nova Southeastern University

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by AnotherCanadian, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. AnotherCanadian

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    Is there anyone here who has any advice about interviewing for the NSU Clinical PhD program? Ideas about what to expect on interview day? Thoughts about the program or the school? Basically, anything relevant to someone who thinks they might really like to go here....? Thanks!

    PS. I know this is irrelevant for most people here on SDN, and I am new to this, so I hope it is ok to make a whole thread about it. If this is some kind of forum faux pas, then I am really sorry!
     
  2. RayneeDeigh

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    I would say just study their website and try to play up to what their strengths are. Sorry I can't be more helpful, I just looked at the website now.

    But now that I have, I wish I'd applied there this year. lol. I'm definitely adding that to my list for next year.
     
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  3. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member
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    AnotherCanadian

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    Yeah, their funding sucks as far as I can tell....

    But, much to my dismay, I haven't been offered interviews at the other PhD programs I have applied to (there are a few I haven't completely ruled out yet, but I think I am out of the running for a number of them). Thus, I am giving this one very strong consideration in spite of the big financial drawback. Also, I really love the program, and think it is a pretty perfect fit for me, so perhaps I am deluding myself, but I like to think that should be weighed against financial costs too.

    I have a few interviews at back up psyd programs, but I would much prefer to do a PhD and don't think Nova would be more costly than most PsyD's. (note: nothing against PsyD's, I just happen to think a PhD would be better). If anyone feels differently, however, I'd love to hear about it. Obviously I am going to make up my own mind, but I am here to listen to what others have to say, so...do you think a PsyD would be a better choice?

    Thanks for your responses, Jon and Raynee!
     
  5. cleverclover

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    I interviewed at NOVA two years ago and received and acceptance, but declined it because I thought it would be too expensive. Many of the graduate students were taking out up to $40,000 a year in loans to cover tuition and living expenses. For me the school looked a lot better on paper than it did in person. But I know several people who received their PhD's there and loved it.
    But for the interview process. What they told us two years ago was that we were already ranked before the interview. The interview was mostly for the interviewees to learn more about the school and the area. The POI I interviewed with said that the best thing for interviewees to do is just sit there and not talk, because you could only move down on the list and not up. I don't know how true that is, but that is what he told us. For the interview itself, you meet one on one with some professors and you have group interviews with other interviewees. I think the best thing to do is just talk to students, ask about funding and what they think of your POI. If you have any more direct questions, please feel free to PM me.
     
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  6. doydoy

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    Which pharmacy school do you attend now Clever Clover?

    Also, from what you're saying from their point system, would they request an interview for someone whom already has a really low score. In other words, how good of a chance do you think someone who recieved an interview will get accepted?

    Thanks
     
  7. RayneeDeigh

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    It says they extend admission invitations to roughly 50 people from less than 200 applicants.

    I'd say that gives everybody with relatively good credentials a very good chance.

    But I guess it depends on how many of those they interview. I'd imagine they don't have time to interview very many people than those they accept since it's such a big number.
     
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  8. cleverclover

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    I think you may be looking at the wrong posts. I was talking about the PhD program at NOVA, not pharmacy. I am not sure what the chance is that a person they interview will get accepted. I was just letting people know what a professor told me when I interviewed there two years ago. Sorry couldn't be more help.
     
  9. psych13

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    I haven't gone on the interview yet and I'm kind of eager to hear what people think of this program?
    If you are currently in the PsyD program please share your experiences.
    From the research I have done it sounds like this is a great program and I'm very excited at the prospect of attending, but I would like some real life experiences.
    Anyone????
     
  10. Therapist4Chnge

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    I'm finishing my 3rd year at Nova, and overall it has been a very good experience. I was accepted into a number of other programs (funded and unfunded) that were rated higher on those posted rankings, but they weren't as good of a fit for what I wanted. I think fit is really important. Everyone has their own criteria....I was concerned with some of the average completion rates of some of the PhD and PsyD programs, as well as having access to solid training in my areas of interest (in addition to another 5-6 things).

    I just missed out on a couple of my top choices, but the year-long wait to re-apply to those programs wasn't worth the funding difference (which is definitely a consideration for most, but I'm going back into consulting, so the $ wasn't a big deal for me; I should have it paid off in ~5-7 years.)

    I think the Nova training is excellent, and I think overall it produces very good clinicians. We do well overall with placement %, with most of the misses due to the stragglers that should have been weeded out. I'd like to see more consistency from top to bottom, but as someone in the top %, I'm happy with my training.

    The biggest knock (besides poor funding) is the size....which in some areas really helps, but in others it hinders. They are cutting the incoming classes each year (as of last year), which is a step in the right direction. If I had my druthers, I'd cut the bottom 20% of the class now, and reduce each year. I've utilized the larger faculty, and have already setup some opportunities down the road (both research and professionally)...so the size helped me in that regard.

    There is a large base of research here (both PsyD and PhD), and you can get access to some great projects. I've done research in a couple of areas, and have been able to present at major conferences and publish. Because there are PhDs and PsyDs in the program, I think it encourages research across the board. For the PsyD, there is a required directed study (that functions like a dissertation) that all students are required to complete, so if you want to avoid doing research as a PsyD (which I think is a HUGE mistake), I'd look elsewhere.

    Nova also has an on-site clinic that hosts a range of faculty run programs, and it provides a major source of research and practicum placements for our students; on and off site practicum experiences are available. The on-site clinic allows for students to more easily balance classes and seeing patients. Off-site experiences (what i've done) offer a range of placements in the field which include mental health centers, hospitals, prisons, etc.

    With the Vail model (PsyD), there are very few fully funded programs, so cost should be considered. PhD programs get most of the funding because of the research grants, though while pursuing your PsyD there are still opportunities for TA, grad assistant, and scholarships.

    I'm taking a less traditional path, so I'm not limited to just clinical or academic work. I had a career in business, so I'm going back into the business world and will be doing mostly business consulting and executive coaching. My clinical interests will still be pursued, just not as my primary focus.

    In retrospect, I wish I would have found SDN sooner. ;)...since I have found out about some great PhD programs that I didn't even consider when I initially applied to clinical programs back in '03.

    -t
     
  11. RayneeDeigh

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    This was REALLY helpful. I'll definitely be applying there next year and as an added bonus, my best friend from grade 7 moved there so it would be a nice reunion. It seems like a really great program if you ignore the funding issues, which I can do. lol
     
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  12. Member878812

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    Hi all,

    Can any recent PhD graduates provide me with perspective on the program, both academically and financially? Are there no funding options for PhD students?
     
  13. PHD12

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    I don't go to this program, but I think you should check-out the APA accredited internship rates. They are at about 50% for the PhD program. It would be helpful to read about the consequences of not completing an APA internship (barred from several employment settings for psychologists including VA and military as well as many post-docs). Do a search on this forum and you can find out more information specific to this program.
     
  14. Therapist4Chnge

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    Here is my 6yr update.

    I think fit is really important. Everyone has their own criteria....I was concerned with some of the average completion rates of some of the PhD and PsyD programs, as well as having access to solid training in my areas of interest (in addition to another 5-6 things).
    Fit is still very important. I think their average completion rates are about the same, so not really an issue bc the length of completion is what it should be for a program.

    I just missed out on a couple of my top choices, but the year-long wait to re-apply to those programs wasn't worth the funding difference (which is definitely a consideration for most, but I'm going back into consulting, so the $ wasn't a big deal for me; I should have it paid off in ~5-7 years.)
    This was short-sighted on my part. I ended up really enjoying working in academic medicine, but I'm not pulling in $200k+ like I would as a consultant, so I am very much stuck with my student loans. See below....

    I think the Nova training is excellent, and I think overall it produces very good clinicians.
    The training can be excellent, but it is very much dependent on your mentor and practica placements. I sought out mentors and it worked out in the end, but there were some frustrations along the way, mostly what I'd expect from a larger program. Others in my cohort ran into more difficulties and had a really rough time with their practica options. If the program was smaller then I think the practica opportunities would be more consistent, but during my time there the practica experiences were a complete crapshoot.

    We do well overall with [internship] placement %,
    Not so anymore. When I started I think the program was right at the APPIC match average (76% or so). That was the lowest of the programs I considered, but it was high enough that I didn't think it was a problem. Since then the numbers have trended down....significantly. Knowing what I know now about the importance of securing an APA-acred internship, I would never consider any program that didn't match at least 80-85%. Almost all of the good jobs require an APA-acred internship these days, so not having one is a HUGE problem. Matching anything less than 75% should be a big red flag for any program.

    The biggest knock (besides poor funding) is the size....which in some areas really helps, but in others it hinders. They are cutting the incoming classes each year (as of last year), which is a step in the right direction.
    They restructured how they tracked the Ph.D. and Psy.D. classes, but they did not reduce the Psy.D.cohort size in any meaningful way. Every year I was there they said they would cut down on the cohort size so the current students would have more resources, but it never happened. I had to fight for all of the good research opportunities, far more than colleagues of mine did at their programs. I was floored to hear friends got handed data and opportunities to write a manuscript from it.

    My clinical practica experience wasn't horrible, but it was still less than ideal now that I know how other programs function. The NYC programs have turned practica placements into a bloodsport over the past 6-8 years, so they are generally a bad comparison. However, the vast majority of other university programs should not have any problems placing their students into high quality placements. It was my experience the NSU struggled with finding quality sites for everyone. Maybe that has changed in the years since I graduated, but the cohort size and poor economy make me think that would be very difficult to do.

    There is a large base of research here (both PsyD and PhD), and you can get access to some great projects. I've done research in a couple of areas, and have been able to present at major conferences and publish.
    This was still true while I was there, however the required research and statistics training is not sufficient on the Psy.D. side of training. I was actively participating in research throughout my time there, so I had the opportunity to receive additional research and stats mentorship. If I didn't do that extra work I'd really be lacking in some of the fundamental training that I use on a weekly basis now. I have had to put in a significant amount of work in the years since to broaden my training and feel more confident with handling larger projects.

    Nova also has an on-site clinic that hosts a range of faculty run programs, and it provides a major source of research and practicum placements for our students; on and off site practicum experiences are available.
    I believe this is still true, though I don't know anywhere there now so YMMV. My off-site practica experiences were generally good, but I know some people who were not happy with the quality of their sites. It is probably a bit of a Hit and Miss scenario.

    With the Vail model (PsyD), there are very few fully funded programs, so cost should be considered. PhD programs get most of the funding because of the research grants, though while pursuing your PsyD there are still opportunities for TA, grad assistant, and scholarships.
    Yes and no. I was able to secure RA and TA positions during my time at NSU, but they were not sufficiently funded (lacked a true tuition waiver....so I still had to pay for most of my credits). The lack of true funding is a HUGE issue at NSU. I believe I paid around $615/credit hour when I started, and now it is $915/credit hour, which represents a 30%+ in the past 9ish years. The increase translate to roughly $35k MORE just in tuition, which is ridiculous.

    In retrospect, I wish I would have found SDN sooner...since I have found out about some great PhD programs that I didn't even consider when I initially applied to clinical programs back in '03.
    Knowing what I know now (and being almost 4 years into repaying my loans)....there is no way I can recommend NSU. The debt back then wasn't worth it, and it is definitely not worth it to me at the current cost. The faculty are definitely a strength of the program and some of the mentorship is still excellent, but the cost and cohort size are just ridiculous.
     
    #14 Therapist4Chnge, Feb 4, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  15. Member878812

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    4change, I can't thank you enough for your input, my initial impressions looking at the numbers were similar to what you describe but it's always comforting to hear my impressions confirmed via a former student.
     
  16. Member6523

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    I've heard the neuropsych students do well but the faculty leave something to be desired.
     
  17. AcronymAllergy

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    In my experience with Nova neuropsych students, I'd say that they're highly variable; I've seen a couple who were solid, and a few who were much less-solid. Nonetheless, they do have a few very well-known faculty in the area, although I have no idea how hard it might be to get substantive attention and training from one of them.
     
  18. MBellows

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    +1
     
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  19. NeuroTrope

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    The two main neuropsychologists who take students are both difficult to work with, for different reasons. Some of their students do become quite accomplished (I'm thinking of one who is staffed at Harvard, and another who is successful at SUNY) but many, especially those in the PsyD program, do not do well. If you are smart and motivated, you'd shine there but you could probably get a better experience for less debt elsewhere.
     
  20. jerray07

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    I was emailed yesterday with an invitation to Interview day (Clinical Psych - PsyD) on March 18th. I'm in Chicago, so as you can imagine that would be a ridiculous drive (something like 21 hours). Does anyone know if they will cover transportation costs (flights, etc). It's somewhat short notice and I don't know if I can come up with a $500 plane ticket in two weeks.

    (My first post!) I've been lurking here a while and decided it was high time to register.
     
  21. futureapppsy2

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    In general, most clinical (and counseling and school) psych programs to do not cover transportation expenses for interviewees, although it never hurts to ask. Also, about 2-3 weeks lead time for an interview is pretty standard.
     
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  22. klehrie

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    Glad I found this thread. I was recently offered admission here, but I have yet to commit because of the HUGE issue of tuition/debt. I do realize funding is an issue here. I had the chance to speak with current students and when debt was mentioned, they would always seem to drift into a far off land, and a dark cloud seemed to roll over (not kidding).

    How does one go about asking their POI about funding, RA, GA/TA opportunities, without sounding like it is the only thing that matters?

    Thanks in advance for the help!
     
  23. AcronymAllergy

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    Good question, and current/former Nova students may be able to chime in on this one. I'd say just asking in a no-nonsense manner would be fine, and if this puts the POI in a huff, then that'd be a red flag for me.

    Then again, despite Nova generally having good outcomes and seemingly training at least a handful of solid students each year, based on the class sizes and cost, I don't know that I'd recommend it to anyone. My other qualm (just based on personal experience) would be that for neuropsych specifically, many of the trainees seem to be overly-focused on the specialty, possibly at the expense of obtaining experience in other areas. This could be a product of the students themselves, though, rather than the program.
     
  24. Doctor Eliza

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    They gave you an offer, so now it is their turn to impress you and convince you that you should go there. The shoe is now on the other foot. Don't be hesitant to be direct.

    Congrats,
    Dr. E
     
  25. KW58D

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    This is a very enlightening post. Thanks!
     
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  26. hillies

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    Saw this just got bumped back up from the abyss and thought I'd chime in that starting with the 2013-14 class, Nova started funding (tuition waivers) most incoming Ph.D. students. Much to the dismay of current Ph.D. students. But...if you're applying in the future, it's probably a fact worth knowing.
     
  27. KW58D

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    Thanks for the update. I will look into the tuition waiver. I am applying for 1 program this year, and numerous programs if it comes to it next year. I am active duty military, so my options this year are very limited, where as when my contract ends I can apply where ever. I have looked at Nova, but this is the first I'm hearing of a tuition waiver. Not that I am affected too much since I still have my GI Bill, but it's more the principal.
     
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  28. MCParent

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    http://www.cps.nova.edu/programs/phd/trainingoutcomes_phd.html

    It looks like they take nearly a hundred PsyDs students each year, and about 10 PhDs. Looks to me like the PsyD students fund the PhD students. I don't think that's a good model for a program.
     
  29. KW58D

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    Is there any evidence to back this up or is this purely conjecture? I know that Nova does conduct research but am not sure exactly of grants or where the funding would be coming from. Also, what kind of funding are we talking about? Full tuition remission with stipend, tuition remission full or partial? Saying in a broad stroke that a program has funding can mean different things.

    I don't think that we can just assume that the PsyD students are funding the PhD students.
     
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  30. MCParent

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    That would be why I said "looks to me like."
     
  31. LivingOffLoans

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    I cannot find any mention on their website of funding for Ph.D. students, other than that some aid may be provided through assistanship at the school. Where are we getting information from that Ph.D. students are getting funded at Nova? And is it full tuition remission, stipend, etc... ? I would be very interested to hear about this. I think their program looks interesting, but the costs seem insane and I personally wouldn't go the PsyD route.
     
  32. lauri89

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    Congratulations! I will also be attending Nova's Clinical Interview day on Feb. 17th and I am extremely nervous. I had applied to only two other clinical PhD programs and haven't heard back. This will be my first time ever attending an interview for graduate school and have the same questions you do. Good luck!
     
  33. LivingOffLoans

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    Lauri, do you know what the deal is with funding for the PhD program? I have heard rumors that things have recently changed for the better. Could you share with me what you know for certain?
     
  34. lauri89

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    Hello LivingOffLoans,

    From what I know so far is that Nova does not offer funding for sure for their PsyD program but I don't know about their PhD. I plan on asking next week after my interview.
     
  35. LivingOffLoans

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    Thanks Lauri. Will you please let us know what you find out? And good luck on your interview!
     
  36. lauri89

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    Thanks! I was avoiding coming back here after my disastrous interview day at Nova for their Clinical PhD. I did receive an email from them the next day saying I had been accepted to their PsyD program already, although I've yet to receive any formal rejection for the PhD so maybe its a good sign?? We are already halfway through March though :scared:. To answer your question, yes this year they are expecting to offer 8 to 10 spots with 100% funding ( tuition only I think). Dr.Lewis (director)told all of us during the last meeting of the day that it was the second year Nova had ever offered funded spots for their Phds. If I would've known this few months prior to submitting my app I would've worked a lot harder towards reaching out to faculty, especially some of which I had already met during my MS program. I guess hindsight is 20/20 though and now I should really just accept it, move on and do some soul searching to see if their PsyD program is a good option for me.
     
  37. hillies

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    The funding is in the form of a full tuition waiver for three years (all coursework is done in first 3 years), although some faculty have funded GA positions. The dean reassured us the funding is coming from the general scholarship fund for the university and research/training grants.

    I believe all PhD offers have been made, or if they haven't, very few remain outstanding. I did hear a rumor about the department potentially offering funding of the same sort to a few of the most qualified/competitive PsyD applicants, though I don't know when/if this will be implemented. Good luck!
     
  38. LivingOffLoans

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    Sorry to hear, Lauri. Congratulations on the PsyD offer though. If you really want their PhD, would you consider rejecting their offer and taking up some assistance work with their faculty? You could consider working with faculty from other university programs as well, if you are applying to several.

    Too bad they don't offer a stipend though, huh? Tuition remission is a good step, but doctoral programs are lengthy, and I would not want to take on any significant additional debt. As my screen name implies, my master's program was expensive.
     
  39. WisNeuro

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    The PhD's tend to fare better than the PsyD's in this program on a variety of indicators fyi. We get a lot of apps from both, and due to teh large student body, it's very hard for applicants to distinguish themselves. In the end we just see what amounts to the same application over and over. Also, Golden writes pretty much the exact same letter for every applicant, so it's not really taken into account when judging LOR's.
     
  40. hillies

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    Why doesn't this surprise me. Oh right, how could I forget his projectives class...

    I would say though, that who you choose to work and what you do with that relationship is probably more predictive of success in our program than which program you are in. PsyD's that get excellent internships (e.g., competitive VA's) tend to have worked closely with at least one interested, involved advisor on research. But, there are also PhD's whose advisors do not hold them accountable for research productivity and they fare far worse. It depends. Personal motivation pays big dividends in our program as there are numerous opportunities regardless of your interest but you have to make the time to take advantage of them and set yourself apart.

    That said, if you are considering either program I would ask current students--either at interview day or afterwards, if possible--about the particular professor(s) are you interested in working with. Most students will have an idea of how involved the usual suspects are in their students' training.
     
    #40 hillies, Mar 12, 2014
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2014
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  41. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Ugh, projectives. What a huge waste of time. So much time spent on very little clinical utility.
     
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  42. hillies

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    But, dammit, after all that administration, scoring, and report writing practice, you will also write a 10 page lit review paper on a random index of the Rorschach you will never think about again, only to receive a check mark on the paper and hate your life for a couple really boring days. So clinically useful.
     
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  43. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Hey now, that check mark is more informative than any Rorschach index. Got to find the silver lining, at least the administration was over.
     
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  44. lauri89

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    Any professors that you would recommend? I'm strongly considering doing the Psy D but only if I can comit to getting heavily involved with a research lab and mentor. I would like the opportunity to publish to make up for my lack of dissertation. When I interviewed with Dr.Lewis I told him I wanted to do researcher and would prefer phd to psyd and he said the Psy D would not limit me. He said that both himself and several of other faculty members worked closely with both psyds along with phd students. I guess those opportunities wont be handed to me lie they are for phd students, but I have to seek them out. Any advise from past psyd students who've been successful in obtaining research opportunities at Nova?
     
  45. AcronymAllergy

    AcronymAllergy Neuropsychologist
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    I (hypothetically) wonder--even if a student is in the Psy.D. program, if they're able to find a willing chair, would they be able to get the school to allow them to complete a formal dissertation?

    Regardless, it sounds like you're approaching this with an appropriate mindset of being proactive and with a plan of going "above and beyond." Given the relatively large recent Psy.D. class sizes, I'd imagine this will be important in obtaining your desired training outcomes.
     
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  46. lauri89

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    Good point! Thanks for your advice :)
     
  47. Rorshocked

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    Yikes...based on the talk here, should I be concerned that I matched at the same internship site as several Nova students? (I'm coming from a top 30 PhD program). Y'all don't make Nova sound that great...
     
  48. AcronymAllergy

    AcronymAllergy Neuropsychologist
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    I've personally just noticed that there's a lot of variability. A Nova Ph.D. student attended internship with me and was great; conversely, I've seen applications from Nova Psy.D. students that've run the gamut from seemingly solid to fairly weak (although not egregious).
     
  49. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    There are usually some gems in the rough.

    Also, what do you mean by top 30? USNWR?
     
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  50. hillies

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    Private message me your interests and I might be able to make a few recommendations. The degree itself doesn't limit your research opportunities while in the program per se, but you will have to take more initiative to get what it sounds like you want. I guess that isn't a bad thing in itself, because a few of the PsyD's that are heavily involved in research ended up with what I'm sure are very very strong recommendation letters from great professors that speak to their initiative and motivation to seek those things out...and they got great internships.

    Just with any other program or group of people it's not all good or all bad, but I'm guessing if it's a solid site, that person worked their butt off just as you did to get there and deserves to be there just as much as you do.
     

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