May 3, 2010
84
4
Status
Medical Student
seriously its easy. Just apply, don't stop yourself from applying based on what someone heard. I know RNs who say they like Doctors who've been in their position before. What does that tell you? Those MDs have been Nurses before.
I have a number of classmates who were nurses before applying to medical school (plus many other allied health fields).

I have no idea where this whole med schools don't take former nurses crap started....Sure, if you don't have a decent MCAT score or good grades you're less likely to get in, but really beyond that there is no anti-nursing sentiment from medical school faculty.
 
May 2, 2010
449
2
somewhere down south
Status
Other Health Professions Student
I have a number of classmates who were nurses before applying to medical school (plus many other allied health fields).

I have no idea where this whole med schools don't take former nurses crap started....Sure, if you don't have a decent MCAT score or good grades you're less likely to get in, but really beyond that there is no anti-nursing sentiment from medical school faculty.
I have not seen that being a nurse is a negative on a med school application either. I can see it being brought up in an interview as to why someone would make the jump from nursing to medicine vs NP, and as long as they have a clear answer along with competitive MCAT scores and grades, I don't think it will really matter.
 

Dwindlin

ASA Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jan 31, 2009
2,533
205
Status
Attending Physician
I have not seen that being a nurse is a negative on a med school application either. I can see it being brought up in an interview as to why someone would make the jump from nursing to medicine vs NP, and as long as they have a clear answer along with competitive MCAT scores and grades, I don't think it will really matter.
I wouldn't call it a negative, but I wouldn't be surprised if it doesn't get brought up at all. Medical schools aren't nearly as impressed with clinical experience of applicants as one would think. Of 5 interviews only one asked about my experience as a fire/medic (which is fairly extensive, including a deployment with a FEMA team to Katrina). It's been stated ad nauseum on this board but it seems most ad coms put healthcare experience in the same category as spending several years doing habitat for humanity, or volunteering at a homeless shelter. It shows you have some interest in humanity. It DEFINITELY won't make up for sub-par academic performance, no matter how much experience you have.
 
About the Ads
May 2, 2010
449
2
somewhere down south
Status
Other Health Professions Student
I wouldn't call it a negative, but I wouldn't be surprised if it doesn't get brought up at all. Medical schools aren't nearly as impressed with clinical experience of applicants as one would think. Of 5 interviews only one asked about my experience as a fire/medic (which is fairly extensive, including a deployment with a FEMA team to Katrina). It's been stated ad nauseum on this board but it seems most ad coms put healthcare experience in the same category as spending several years doing habitat for humanity, or volunteering at a homeless shelter. It shows you have some interest in humanity. It DEFINITELY won't make up for sub-par academic performance, no matter how much experience you have.
Anyone who thinks it will make up for bad grades or low MCAT scores are fooling themselves, but it's not the same thing as volunteering as a candy striper. If someone has extensive hospital based experience such as RN, PA, RT, you can say that because you work side by side with doctors every day for 10 years that you are aware of the sacrifice and hard work it takes to be a doctor, you know what you are getting into, and you understand the role. Most of the people on this board have never sat on an adcom, or have ever spoken to people on them. They are assuming this, but don't know. When you work in a teaching hospital, most of those residents have sat on adcoms for their med schools, and they all tell me that nursing is a plus, as long as you have the grades to back it up.
 
May 18, 2011
1
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I am a pre-nursing student, who has gotten it in my head, that what if Nursing is not ENOUGH for me? What if I want to go farther? I'm a take charge kind of person, and think maybe the autonomy of being an MD would fit me better. But then, I haven't had the opp to do any shadowing, so technically, on a day-to-day basis, I don't know which I would like better.

Out of all the RN-TO-MD threads, I haven't heard too many people express the actual underlying reason why they want to do it.

I would love to hear what it is about the actual work that you desire to be different and think you would enjoy better as a doc. I too, have heard that if I want to go MD, just do it. That getting my RN and going right to Med School would not be looked upon very well (probably as opposed to at least working as an RN before switching, I don't know). I am open to hear what everyone has to say about this. It's really hard to make a comparison without the first-hand knowledge.

Thanks.:)
 

The right Path

Goodbye Cherry Ames
Dec 10, 2009
540
2
Nor-Cal
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm an RN with almost 7 years of experience and I plan to change careers. The reason I went into nursing is because I wanted to provide direct care to my patients. For years I have really enjoyed being the person that is always accessible to the patient, directly providing their therapies, constantly assessing their progress, teaching them about their pathophys, treatments, etc. and just being there to listen to what is on their mind, treating them like a person deserving of dignity and care.

I had always planned on continuing my education, but I didn't really make any concrete plans as graduate degree programs in nursing didn't quite appeal strongly to me. So anyways, to try to sum up what could be a long story, I had some experiences/opportunities that illuminated a different career path. I decided I would like to be involved in the diagnostic aspect of medicine and I would really enjoy the coursework required. Designing and monitoring appropriate therapy isn't relevant to the career that I am envisioning. However, that aspect would also interest me should I change my mind about the particular field of medicine I am interested in.

That's it, in a nutshell.
Edit: It's not that nursing's not enough, believe me, far from it... I'm just pulled toward a different facet of healthcare.
 
Last edited:
Nov 1, 2009
35
1
Status
Medical Student
Honestly...there is no real difference between an RN applying to med school and a biology major applying. Good grades and a good MCAT score is key for both. The only real difference is in the nurses favor since you'll have clinical experience. I don't think there is any school that is 'nurse-friendly' but it may help to look at the class composition of the school you want to attend and see how many non-science majors/non-trads make up the previous first year class. I was accepted to 3 of the 5 schools I applied to and I went to nursing school in a tiny school in puerto rico! You all will do fine!
 
Jun 16, 2011
12
1
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hi everyone!

I'd really appreciate getting some input from all of you about my plans to become a nurse and then a doctor. I've heard of a lot of nurses who became doctors later on so I know that it is possible. However, most of them do it as a career change. I already am fairly certain that I want to be a doctor, a D.O. specifically, but feel as though I need to be financially secure before going for the long-haul studies in the event that life doesn't go as planned. So my plan is to do an ADN at my community college first, then transfer to a 4-yr university to continue with a BSN while working part-time as an RN and taking the necessary prerequisites for medical school at the same time. I believe that by doing nursing first I will gain a much better understanding of what it takes to be a doctor since I will essentially be shadowing doctors on the job while gaining real-world experience simultaneously. I am concerned about the basic prerequisites required for medical school and my training in nursing may not be enough for medical school? Or perhaps rather than continue on to a BSN, I could still work as an RN but do a BS in Biology/Pre-med instead? Would that be better? What do all of you think? Any advice or suggestion would be greatly appreciated. :)

I posted this in another thread. I think it's better to join the discussion there since more has been said.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=11142172#post11142172
 
Last edited:
Jul 11, 2009
54
1
Southern CT
Status
Podiatry Student
I would do a BS in Biology right from the get go. It is the traditional path for a student interested in becoming a MD/DO/DDS/DPM/PA etc. I went to a university with a nursing program and they had a completely watered down curriculum geared towards their profession. As a bio major you are going to be taking all of the biology, gen chem, o chem and physics that will be required for both entrance into medschool as well as the MCAT.
 
May 3, 2010
84
4
Status
Medical Student
I would do a BS in Biology right from the get go. It is the traditional path for a student interested in becoming a MD/DO/DDS/DPM/PA etc. I went to a university with a nursing program and they had a completely watered down curriculum geared towards their profession. As a bio major you are going to be taking all of the biology, gen chem, o chem and physics that will be required for both entrance into medschool as well as the MCAT.
I disagree. It's pretty tough to find a job with just a BS in biology. You're better off getting a degree that gives you a "back up" career if you don't get into medical school. There is no reason why you can't take higher level biology, chemistry and physics while your in nursing school, psych, social work, etc..; it might take a little more work and possibly an extra semester, but its better than trying to find a job in a field that your not particularly interested in (biology).
 
Jun 16, 2011
12
1
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I disagree. It's pretty tough to find a job with just a BS in biology. You're better off getting a degree that gives you a "back up" career if you don't get into medical school. There is no reason why you can't take higher level biology, chemistry and physics while your in nursing school, psych, social work, etc..; it might take a little more work and possibly an extra semester, but its better than trying to find a job in a field that your not particularly interested in (biology).
Hmm... I don't know yet. I have a list of questions to ask my advisor Thursday. The main thing I'm worried about is that the nursing will reflect poorly on me when I go to medical school. Some say it won't and that they may even be impressed, other's say it's a waste of time and money.

I posted this on another thread and it seems to be getting more responses, so if you'd like to join the discussion. Go here: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=11142172#post11142172

I wanted to add that I am interested in biology. I love the sciences in general, but then again I love a lot of things. If the amount of work I'd have to put in wasn't so off-putting and over-whelming I'd want to triple major in say psychology/anthropology/microbiology while pre-med. But I'm quite aware at how unrealistic that is. Nursing is exciting for me as well, don't get me wrong, but I also know that I will grow tired of the lack of autonomy it allows. The scope of practice is limiting, but I do believe it can be a step to medical school just as any other bachelor's degree is. I just don't know if it's the best step to take or not because I don't think I have all the information yet to form a clear decision. It's hard to know what the process will be like if you haven't been through it which is why I'm hoping some people on the forum can share their experience and advice on the subject.
 
Last edited:
Jun 16, 2011
12
1
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I would do a BS in Biology right from the get go. It is the traditional path for a student interested in becoming a MD/DO/DDS/DPM/PA etc. I went to a university with a nursing program and they had a completely watered down curriculum geared towards their profession. As a bio major you are going to be taking all of the biology, gen chem, o chem and physics that will be required for both entrance into medschool as well as the MCAT.
If I became a nurse I still plan on taking the necessary premed requirements - 2 yrs biology, 1 yr gen chemistry, 1 yr org chemistry, 1 yr physics, 1 yr englsh, and calc or stats. Those are the requirements for most medical schools I believe. That and a bachelor's degree which I've been informed doesn't have to be in the sciences. Do you still think that if I were to take those pre-med classes alongside of nursing that I still would find myself behind in medical school?

More has been mentioned in regards to my question in this thread. Go here: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=11142172#post11142172
 

The right Path

Goodbye Cherry Ames
Dec 10, 2009
540
2
Nor-Cal
Status
Pre-Medical
It may be difficult to squeeze in all the med school pre-reqs into a nursing major schedule (as nursing labs and clinicals, not to mention nursing coursework as well as other gen ed requirements) are very time consuming. And nursing class scheduling is typically not flexible.

It's been said before, but I'll say it again. If your ultimate aim is med school, majoring in nursing is not the best way to go about it. If you are intelligent, compassionate and want to be a kickass nurse, then please, by all means, go into nursing and be that rockstar. If not, then don't.... Just don't.
 
About the Ads
Dec 3, 2010
34
0
Status
Medical Student
I'm an RN and I start medical school this fall. It's totally possible! I initially had no interest in medicine until my last year of my ADN program, but by then I was already working on some BSN classes. After I graduated with my ADN, I got a full-time job working on a med-surg floor that summer but I really wanted to get into medical school asap. I went back to school that fall to finish my BSN classes. It was crazy doing full-time school and work. I only did that for one year and the next year I did part-time work and full-time school b/c labs took too much out of my schedule. It was overwhelming at times, but prayer and support from family and friends went a long way for me. If you're contemplating on going to MD from RN, more power to you! Just make sure this is going to make you happier b/c it is a big sacrifice!
 
Dec 3, 2010
34
0
Status
Medical Student
It may be difficult to squeeze in all the med school pre-reqs into a nursing major schedule (as nursing labs and clinicals, not to mention nursing coursework as well as other gen ed requirements) are very time consuming. And nursing class scheduling is typically not flexible.

It's been said before, but I'll say it again. If your ultimate aim is med school, majoring in nursing is not the best way to go about it. If you are intelligent, compassionate and want to be a kickass nurse, then please, by all means, go into nursing and be that rockstar. If not, then don't.... Just don't.
Agree. Nursing programs are competitive. If you don't want to be an RN, you are taking the place of someone that does really want to be an RN. Business would be a good major + pre-reqs for medical school.
 
Jan 16, 2012
1
0
Puerto Rico
Status
Other Health Professions Student
Hi, everyone I'm so glad i came across this thread, great stuff and very encouraging!!!
Well a little about me; I'm 26 a freshman at UMET in Puerto Rico pursuing my BSN. I was a surgical tech in the Air Force for 4 years Loved it! I actually wanted medical school as my first option after high school when i was 17 long time ago!! That obviously didn't happen got married got divorced and now I'm back in college. So far i have been able to maintain a 4.00 GPA will see this semester :xf:. I'm very interested in actually pursuing medical school right after my BSN since i already have health care experience i don't think that i would need to do volunteer work but definitely open to it :love:. I'm more so interested in gathering information in regards to the education steps to take immediately right afther my BSN (pre-requisites for Med school) also any helpful tips on when would be a good time to begin studying for MCAT.... and any other helpful advice :D

P.S.
my greatest fear or actually challenge is that i keep make my age a obstacle ( I hate been the oldest in class, but to my defense i fill that it is because of my age I'm a more responsible, determined and successful student :idea: )
- Ina
 

The right Path

Goodbye Cherry Ames
Dec 10, 2009
540
2
Nor-Cal
Status
Pre-Medical
First thing, good luck on your journey.

Re: pre-reqs-

Most schools require 1 year of English, General Chemistry I and II with labs, Organic Chemistry I and (usually also II) with labs, General Biology I and II with labs, and Physics I and II with labs. There is some variation among schools regarding Statistics, Biochem, Calc, etc., in which case the MSAR will be the most valuable resource for you.

You can try to get some (or all) of these done while you're in your undergrad program, but it may be difficult fit some of these classes into your schedule with the inflexible and time-consuming nursing curriculum. If that's the case, don't sweat it- it is better to finish your pre-reqs as a formal or informal post-bacc than to have your GPA suffer from trying to cram too many classes/activities into your schedule.

Re: MCAT

There are some timelines and info about resources on the MCAT forum. You don't have to wait until a certain time to start studying, but you should save the practice exams until you are no more than 3 months away from taking the real deal. This is a test you should be prepared for and aim to do only once.

Re: Extracurricular activities

Do what you are passionate about, and start today and do it regularly. Yes, nursing school will provide clinical exposure, but it won't necessarily help you learn a lot about the medical education process or the physician's day-to-day responsibilities from the physician's perspective. And that doesn't really count as volunteering. That doesn't mean you have to volunteer at the hospital to greet visitors or run lab specimens, but it is a good idea to find some way of giving your time and talents to your community that is meaningful to you. If it is healthcare related, cool, if not, still cool. I personally think it's a good idea to shadow a few different physicians in a few different fields- hell, it's not a bad idea to shadow healthcare professionals in other disciplines as well (ex. PT/OT, etc.), but I doubt that doing just that on a weekly basis for hundreds of hours is a good use of your time. It is also a good idea to get involved in research of some kind. Your school should be able to help you hook up with someone that needs some research assistants or volunteers.

These forums are a great resource for information, just be aware that anyone can post just about anything, and you may have to do some fact-checking for yourself. And opinions are like- well, you know, right? We all have 'em.
 
Jan 24, 2012
2
0
Los Angeles, County
Status
Non-Student
Hi Meeko1452! I think you're the one who can answer my question. Or questions, for that matter. Okay, here's the story. I'm a nurse and i have been working as one for 3 years now. I want to become an MD, but I don't know how or where to begin. I immigrated to the United States with my parents when I was 20. All my schooling were done in Asia. My BS Nursing I got it there too. I applied for eligibility to take the RN boards here that's why I'm able to work as one. When you say premed/ prereqs, do i need to get another BS degree? Like BS BIology? Or do i go to a college/ university and just enroll the required subjects/ prereqs? Is it possible to apply for medical school with just the degree i took from the foreign country? I don't kow how the school system works here that's why i have so many questions. If i needed to talk to an academic counselor, where do i find one if I'm not in school yet?Please help.
 
Jan 24, 2012
2
0
Los Angeles, County
Status
Non-Student
Hi everyone! I read all the posts and I am greatly encouraged by your stories! here's my story. I'm a nurse and i have been working as one for 3 years now. I want to become an MD, but I don't know how or where to begin. I immigrated to the United States with my parents when I was 20. All my schooling were done in Asia. My BS Nursing I got it there too. I applied for eligibility to take the RN boards here that's why I'm able to work as one. When you say premed/ prereqs, do i need to get another BS degree? Like BS BIology? Or do i go to a college/ university and just enroll the required subjects/ prereqs? Is it possible to apply for medical school with just the degree i took from the foreign country? I don't kow how the school system works here that's why i have so many questions. If i needed to talk to an academic counselor, where do i find one if I'm not in school yet?Please help.
 
Jul 13, 2011
18
0
Covington, LA
www.facebook.com
Status
Attending Physician
I've been in clinical practice as an LPN, RN and now NP for 34 years, and am still working on the MD. While it's not impossible, it is very difficult, time-consuming and expensive.

That said, these days an NP can do almost anything a general practice MD can do, so while not technically an MD, from a functionality standpoint there isn't a whole lot of difference between the two trades.
 

ghost dog

10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2008
830
5
Kazakhstan
Status
Attending Physician
I've been in clinical practice as an LPN, RN and now NP for 34 years, and am still working on the MD. While it's not impossible, it is very difficult, time-consuming and expensive.

That said, these days an NP can do almost anything a general practice MD can do, so while not technically an MD, from a functionality standpoint there isn't a whole lot of difference between the two trades.
Upon reviewing this poster's blog, it becomes apparent that this NP sells bioidentical hormones, zinc and other related nonsense. Pretty much the usual chicanery in the pursuit of the almighty dollar.

I find it interesting that this poster remarks that obtaining a medical degree is "very difficult, time-consuming and expensive". If NP's and family physicians perform essentially the same tasks , " from a functionality standpoint ", why does it take MDs 10,000 hours to obtain this training while it only takes NPs approximately
600 - 800 clinical training hours?

Have NP schools somehow come up with an amazing way of teaching that has alluded medical schools ?

Something is missing here.
 

Makati2008

Moderator
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2008
1,641
417
Status
Attending Physician
Upon reviewing this poster's blog, it becomes apparent that this NP sells bioidentical hormones, zinc and other related nonsense. Pretty much the usual chicanery in the pursuit of the almighty dollar.

I find it interesting that this poster remarks that obtaining a medical degree is "very difficult, time-consuming and expensive". If NP's and family physicians perform essentially the same tasks , " from a functionality standpoint ", why does it take MDs 10,000 hours to obtain this training while it only takes NPs approximately
600 - 800 clinical training hours?

Have NP schools somehow come up with an amazing way of teaching that has alluded medical schools ?

Something is missing here.
Wondering if she is doing Oceania for med school.../
 

emedpa

GlobalDoc
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 25, 2001
6,014
301
Taking an Away team....
Status
Post Doc
a medical degree is "very difficult, time-consuming and expensive". If np's and family physicians perform essentially the same tasks , " from a functionality standpoint ", why does it take mds 10,000 hours to obtain this training while it only takes nps approximately
600 - 800 clinical training hours?
Have np schools somehow come up with an amazing way of teaching that has alluded medical schools ?
Something is missing here.
wormholes.
Time/space modification.
800 hrs > 10,000 hrs because each hr of an np program is actually 20 hrs in an alternate dimension....
 
About the Ads

Bernoull

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 24, 2007
1,724
9
Ischioanal fossa
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Upon reviewing this poster's blog, it becomes apparent that this NP sells bioidentical hormones, zinc and other related nonsense. Pretty much the usual chicanery in the pursuit of the almighty dollar.

I find it interesting that this poster remarks that obtaining a medical degree is "very difficult, time-consuming and expensive". If NP's and family physicians perform essentially the same tasks , " from a functionality standpoint ", why does it take MDs 10,000 hours to obtain this training while it only takes NPs approximately
600 - 800 clinical training hours?


Have NP schools somehow come up with an amazing way of teaching that has alluded medical schools ?

Something is missing here.
It's called living in a bubble that's impenetrable to facts...
 
Mar 18, 2012
3
0
Status
Medical Student
Hi All! I too am a RN and now med student. Im also 29 so it can be done....I got a MSN, did a post bacc and entered med school here in the states...was it worth it: YES! I am MUCH HAPPIER in my career :p
 
Mar 2, 2012
71
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I have an RN and a BSN, and I am applying to medical school this year. I earned a 39R on my MCAT and have an overall 3.98GPA with a 4.00 science GPA. However what I am learning is that medical schools want research experience and don't care too much about hospital based clinical experiences.
 

tinylilron

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 13, 2006
1,198
10
Status
Medical Student
I am assuming that you were all non-traditional students as you were nurses before you went to medical school. How long were the majority of you nurses? I am not a nurse but I graduated from undergrad 5 years ago. Should I still contact my undergrad pre-medical committee before I start the application process?

Thank you for all your help.

Sincerely,

Verónica


I did nurse to MD (currently a 4th year). Although I am the only nurse in my class of 150, there is another nurse in the year behind me.
My med school interview was very benign (I only applied to one program) and everyone I have come into contact with has been very supportive.
The advice above is right on--speak with an academic advisor early, do well on your MCAT, and understand that medical school will bring a whole new set of challenges and is not simply a "longer version of nursing school" (as one of my coworkers keeps saying) and the nurse to doctor transition is definitely doable.
 

tinylilron

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 13, 2006
1,198
10
Status
Medical Student
Hi everyone! I read all the posts and I am greatly encouraged by your stories! here's my story. I'm a nurse and i have been working as one for 3 years now. I want to become an MD, but I don't know how or where to begin. I immigrated to the United States with my parents when I was 20. All my schooling were done in Asia. My BS Nursing I got it there too. I applied for eligibility to take the RN boards here that's why I'm able to work as one. When you say premed/ prereqs, do i need to get another BS degree? Like BS BIology? Or do i go to a college/ university and just enroll the required subjects/ prereqs? Is it possible to apply for medical school with just the degree i took from the foreign country? I don't kow how the school system works here that's why i have so many questions. If i needed to talk to an academic counselor, where do i find one if I'm not in school yet?Please help.
http://www.studentdoc.com/medical-school-requirements.html <-- check out this link and google search medical school pre-requites. Coming from a nursing school, I don't think your course work from nursing school will be sufficient. I think medical schools want you to take basic hardcore science classes. I am not sure where one can find an academic advisor without being affiliated with a university. Let me know if/when you find out. I would like to get some career and academic counseling myself. :)
 

tinylilron

Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 13, 2006
1,198
10
Status
Medical Student
P.S.
my greatest fear or actually challenge is that i keep make my age a obstacle ( I hate been the oldest in class, but to my defense i fill that it is because of my age I'm a more responsible, determined and successful student :idea: )
- Ina
I will be 27 soon and if accepted I will start medical school when I am 28 (I think)... in 2014. So we will be in the same boat. Do you have children? I am just curious because you mentioned that you were married. I am looking to potentially get married in the near future too and I am concerned about trying to support a family and be a successful medical student at the same time.

Best of luck on your journey.

Best,

Verónica
 
Sep 28, 2012
8
3
Status
Pre-Medical
i think i am in the dilemma .I am an international student also in the medicine track but doing my premeds and nursing at the same time .I have about 100 hours of volunteering ,tutoring experiences in sciences , involved in a lot of sciences and non science clubs ,volunteering now at a science research lab combined with my volunteer at church .I also may add my 6 hours nursing clinical every week . Please what are my chances bearing in mind that i will take the mcat next year .My cGPA is 3.7 .advice pls from anyone.Thanks
 
Mar 2, 2012
71
0
Status
Pre-Medical
^^^^

If you don't try, you will most certainly fail. But if you try, you might just succeed in your goals.

Even if your chances are 1 in a million, why not try to achieve your dreams? What do you have to lose?
 
About the Ads

takeonme

5+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2012
362
497
Status
Medical Student
I have an RN and a BSN, and I am applying to medical school this year. I earned a 39R on my MCAT and have an overall 3.98GPA with a 4.00 science GPA. However what I am learning is that medical schools want research experience and don't care too much about hospital based clinical experiences.
How long have you been working as an RN and did you do a majority of your prereqs while working as an RN or prior to? I'm afraid that my work schedule will not be accommodating to taking classes, even if it is just one, and I'm wondering how to go about finishing up my prereqs (need to start bio and orgo)
 

tobi44

5+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2010
122
4
California
Status
Medical Student
May I ask the Rn's here why there switching to medical school? Are you unsatisfied with your careers? The reason i ask is b/c im a recent graduate with a liberal arts degree and dont have the GPA to get into medical school but im sure ill get accepted to a nursing program. i'm thinking about heading the NP route as an alternative, but my question is will i be satisfied working as an NP, or should i still strive to get into medical school? I was thinking once i finish my second bachelors in nursing i can try going for med school again
fyi, if you know your goal is med school I would skip the nursing degrees and go straight to a post-bac program. Pursing a nursing career would burn though your time and resources without really getting you any closer to med school...
 
Mar 14, 2013
1
0
Status
Non-Student
I too am considering becoming an MD, I'm in nursing school right now and in my mid 20's. My main concern isn't whether I can get through the MD program but my age by the time I get around to it. So right now it's kind of a toss between MD & CRNA.
 

Dejavu

ASA Member
10+ Year Member
May 17, 2007
505
184
No where special
Status
Attending Physician
I too am considering becoming an MD, I'm in nursing school right now and in my mid 20's. My main concern isn't whether I can get through the MD program but my age by the time I get around to it. So right now it's kind of a toss between MD & CRNA.
I borrowed these comments below from the other thread.


Originally Posted by CityLights
I lurk on the anesthesia forum here as I'm interested in the specialty. You may get better advice there though they can be hostile to CRNA's posting. There is one poster there who made the transition from CRNA->MD, though decades ago when the climate was different (I think his username is Dejavu?).

Anyway, some questions:

-How old are you? Do you have a family? Do you want one?

- Do you have any of the medical school prerequisites completed? How competitive are your stats so far (GPA, etc.)?

- Are you open to moving across the country for medical school? For residency?

- Are you considering pursuing other specialties besides anesthesia, or are you only interested in becoming an anesthesiologist?

As a CRNA, I would guess that you have some of the pre-requisites completed. But if not, that could add another two years before you can apply. Add that to four years of medical school, 4-5 years of residency (if you pursue a fellowship), and you could be looking at just over a decade before practicing as an anesthesiologist. Depending on many factors such as your age, current ability to pay for school, and the practice environment in ten years... financially speaking, this is likely to be a "wash" at best and likely something you won't ever benefit from (financially). However, it's hard to put a price on career satisfaction, and if this is something you really want to do, then it's better to do it sooner rather than later.

If you're curious about how this would affect you financially, I would suggest creating an excel spreadsheet with two scenarios -- one if you continue as a CRNA, and one if you choose to pursue medicine. This will better help you visualize the opportunity cost of pursuing medicine (or potentially, the long-term opportunity cost of remaining as is).
This is all very true.






I am that guy mentioned in the CRNA to MD thread who did what you are thinking about doing, CRNA to MD (not, by the way, MDA).

Much of what I have to say may be interesting and, hopefully helpful, to anyone thinking of med school.

I was unprepared for the amount of work that Med school and residency were. The first two years of med school are about 27 credit hours each semester of hard core science, not music history. I studied from 0800 to supper time, ate with my family then studied till 2200, each night and weekends for two years. There is no comparison of work involved between CRNA school and Med school. None.

Then you are a peon med student on the wards for the last two years. So low on the totem pole that nurses consider it okay to just grab a chart out of your hands without asking, since you are a non-entity. And every day you submit to grilling from every doctor you meet. Believe me, you get no credit for all the experience you gained as an RN and CRNA. They don't care.

You will gain no retirement benefits for those years, and no salary, since you are a student, not an employee.

Then you get out and into internship year. I was in the Marine Corps for 4 years and I would rather do those 4 years over again than my internship year.

And, depending on the specialty, the 3-6 more years of residency aren't much better. Again, you gain no retirement benefits, work long hours for little pay.

You better really want to be a physician. I wasn't prepared for all the work and BS involved.

Am I glad, now, that I did it? I would answer with a qualified "yes". But not without regret and second thoughts. My family and I were clinically depressed as we all went through it. If you have kids, my biggest regret of doing this was having moved my son in the middle of high school. That was 20 yrs ago and I think he is still angry about the upheaval in his life, just to follow my dream.

If you want this, do it and do it now. It will take 10 yrs, but you will be 10yrs older whether you do it or not.

Being a physician is pretty nice, but a hard road to get there. I don't care what schooling you have had in the past, this pathway is harder by many multipliers. At least go into it with your eyes open, and, if you are married, with your family fully prepared.
 

imagin916

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 23, 2003
69
3
40
LI, NY
Visit site
Status
You most certainly can! I have worked with several doctors who were nurses first. I took the prereqs as a post bac as I was planning to apply to med school, but am planning on doing CRNA instead because I know that I want to work in this field and would rather not chance not matching to anesthesia as a doctor. Working under MD supervision doesn't bother me at all. I have even had MD anesthesiologists encourage CRNA vs MD because of the shorter path.

If this is your dream, go for it!
 
Jun 27, 2013
5
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Similar story to share here.

I m 26, from Hong Kong.
Holder of BSc Biochemistry
Master of Nursing, with GPA 3.55/4

Started working as RN in ICU for 1.5 years
Then I decided to ahead go pursuing my childhood dream in medicine.
This has been a very difficult decision because I am married, have one child.
There is no hope in getting to medical school in Hong Kong because there is only 2 medical schools here. Places are largely reserved for secondary school leavers.

Ive decided to pursue the MBBS in Australia.
Early this year, I quitted my job. Put myself on long term night shift working as a private case nurse while studying hard for the MCAT exam for 3 months.
I've got a 31 (11PS 9VR 11BS). Offered an interview from the Monash.
I guess I am expecting an offer.

Just stay on your dream if some of u here really wanna be a doc.
 
Jul 1, 2013
44
13
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi Dejavu,

I am currently in a nursing program and will be graduating with my ADN next summer and my BSN with the anticipated grad date of Spring 2015. I am also a Marine who did 4 years and did a whole career change to healthcare. I am taking my pre-reqs right now the same time for med school while I am taking my nursing courses.

I just wanted to say that your post back in March really motivated me to start with my pre-reqs and keep pursuing my dream. I know it's a long road, but I just need to keep at it.
 

Dejavu

ASA Member
10+ Year Member
May 17, 2007
505
184
No where special
Status
Attending Physician
Hi Dejavu,

I am currently in a nursing program and will be graduating with my ADN next summer and my BSN with the anticipated grad date of Spring 2015. I am also a Marine who did 4 years and did a whole career change to healthcare. I am taking my pre-reqs right now the same time for med school while I am taking my nursing courses.

I just wanted to say that your post back in March really motivated me to start with my pre-reqs and keep pursuing my dream. I know it's a long road, but I just need to keep at it.
Well, Semper Fi, it is nice to know that I helped a little bit to get you on your way.

It is not an easy path, but you would hate to regret not doing it, come 10 yrs from now. Just jump in with both feet and hang on.
 
Jul 1, 2013
1
0
Status
Non-Student
About me:
25 years old. BS in exercise science 2010 (originally considered PT school.) Decided to pursue nursing because I could work directly with ill patients in hospital setting, make decent money, have good future options (NP, CRNA), and still have a life (work 3 12s). Obtained BSN 2012 via accelerated program. I have been working on a med surg floor for 6 months now. I am good at my job but already considering future (higher education). CRNA has crossed my mind but I do not think I'd be interested solely in GAS. PA and NP are valid choices but I don't want to wonder "what if" down the road. I want to learn medicine, all if it. i want to be a physician. I need to repeat the prereqs because most of them are either too old, low grades, or taken at a CC. How does one go about taking all of these classes while doing shift work? Would it be better to switch to an 8 hour gig (ie periop) to be able to take classes at night. I want to continue to work full time to save money and gain more healthcare experience in the process. Thoughts from those who did premed while working as a nurse full time...
 

Jewels86

5+ Year Member
Apr 7, 2013
198
66
Texas
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
About me:
25 years old. BS in exercise science 2010 (originally considered PT school.) Decided to pursue nursing because I could work directly with ill patients in hospital setting, make decent money, have good future options (NP, CRNA), and still have a life (work 3 12s). Obtained BSN 2012 via accelerated program. I have been working on a med surg floor for 6 months now. I am good at my job but already considering future (higher education). CRNA has crossed my mind but I do not think I'd be interested solely in GAS. PA and NP are valid choices but I don't want to wonder "what if" down the road. I want to learn medicine, all if it. i want to be a physician. I need to repeat the prereqs because most of them are either too old, low grades, or taken at a CC. How does one go about taking all of these classes while doing shift work? Would it be better to switch to an 8 hour gig (ie periop) to be able to take classes at night. I want to continue to work full time to save money and gain more healthcare experience in the process. Thoughts from those who did premed while working as a nurse full time...
I am an Emergency Room nurse in transition from a night job to a day job while taking premeds. Got my BSN straight from a university program.

NP does sound like a good option, since all I want to do is Family medicine. Although I do not want to do that route, mostly because I don't feel as if I'll be trained well enough to recognize the more acute illnesses I would encounter since, as you already know, not every patient presents the same way, I'm concerned that the family physician's role will diminish while the mid-level's role will rise. I love teaching patients about their illnesses and meds.

Anyway...I take two classes at a time although I took three in Spring. My classes are through a CC except Spring, which was with the university. Why CC: Cost and I prefer the closer contact with both the students and instructor.

I'd keep the 3x12 hours. You are already in the zone; why add an extra day onto that!!
 

anbuitachi

10+ Year Member
Oct 26, 2008
4,756
1,742
Utah
Status
Attending Physician
people actually believed that nurses cant be doctors? for reals? what you become in life depends on your own abilities. anyone smart/capable enough can be a doctor. those people who say nurses can't be doctors are prob those who couldn't make it to medical school themselves.
 
Jun 13, 2013
8
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I am an Emergency Room nurse in transition from a night job to a day job while taking premeds. Got my BSN straight from a university program.

NP does sound like a good option, since all I want to do is Family medicine. Although I do not want to do that route, mostly because I don't feel as if I'll be trained well enough to recognize the more acute illnesses I would encounter since, as you already know, not every patient presents the same way, I'm concerned that the family physician's role will diminish while the mid-level's role will rise. I love teaching patients about their illnesses and meds.

Anyway...I take two classes at a time although I took three in Spring. My classes are through a CC except Spring, which was with the university. Why CC: Cost and I prefer the closer contact with both the students and instructor.

I'd keep the 3x12 hours. You are already in the zone; why add an extra day onto that!!
You did your prereqs at a community college? I thought med schools don't allow that.
 
Jun 13, 2013
8
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Let's revive this thread again! I'm curious to know how many people that expressed interest to change careers from nursing to med school actually went through with it and what was your experience like?
 
Jan 3, 2014
47
36
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Let's revive this thread again! I'm curious to know how many people that expressed interest to change careers from nursing to med school actually went through with it and what was your experience like?
ED nurse with BSN with three years experience starting medical school this summer. The experience was amazing and challenging. I also did a DIY post-bacc for the basic courses (bio, chem, o chem, and physics) part time over two years. Decent GPA, okay MCAT. Accepted allopathic and osteopathic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: takeonme

takeonme

5+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2012
362
497
Status
Medical Student
ED nurse with BSN with three years experience starting medical school this summer. The experience was amazing and challenging. I also did a DIY post-bacc for the basic courses (bio, chem, o chem, and physics) part time over two years. Decent GPA, okay MCAT. Accepted allopathic and osteopathic.
Congrats!!! Oh man I noticed I posted on this thread in 2012 when I was getting ready to start the prereqs and I will be applying this cycle. How time flies
 
  • Like
Reactions: ResQRN144
About the Ads