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Hi. I'm planning to go to NYU. As you probably know, NYU has some pretty crazy fees (room and board, expenses, tuition, etc.) that can reach up to 63,000 dollars.

I'm just worrying that 4 years of undergrad at NYU + 4 years of medical school debt will financially destroy me in the future. Have any of you graduated from expensive private schools and/or private medical schools and still turned out fine?
 

Goro

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Just do two years at a CC and then transfer to NYU. The diploma will say "NYU".
 
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Hi. I'm planning to go to NYU. As you probably know, NYU has some pretty crazy fees (room and board, expenses, tuition, etc.) that can reach up to 63,000 dollars.

I'm just worrying that 4 years of undergrad at NYU + 4 years of medical school debt will financially destroy me in the future. Have any of you graduated from expensive private schools and/or private medical schools and still turned out fine?
I also got into NYU, but chose not to go just because $220,000+ debt after just undergrad is too much in general, forget med school. It was the best school I got into, but the school I'm at right now isn't known nearly as well as NYU, but I'm confident I can get into med school anyway.

Just keep it in perspective. Do you really need an overpriced educated to get into med school? No. Will it help? Maybe. Do what's right for you.
 

gyngyn

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I haven't seen anyone who finished residency "destroyed by debt" no matter where they attended.
I have seen people crippled by undergraduate and medical school debt who attended an offshore school and did not match.
 
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ndafife

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You're going to have to be smart with your planning in the future. While cost is important for many/most students when applying, you're going to have to be extra smart about it (IE: don't go to a place like Tufts with a COA ~$90 k a year). Keep in mind there are a lot of ways to get medical school for free if you make certain commitments (Rural med, military, etc...)

But there is nothing you can do about it now. Get good grades and focus on actually getting into medical school.
 
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How easy is it to get that financial aid, especially at NYU?
It's not. Once you get a financial aid package from the school your locked into it for all four years if you accept. And then you have to rely on outside grants, scholarships and loans.
 

Spector1

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NYU is notoriously stingy with fin aid.
 

el_duderino

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I think that if you're planning on going to a professional school such as medical school after undergrad, it's ludicrous and unnecessary to pay $60k+ per year for undergrad. 2 at CC plus 2 at NYU is reasonable, but to me it makes more sense to go to a state school. Binghamton or Stony Brook if you're in NY.
 

WedgeDawg

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I personally don't think the "prestige" of NYU is worth that much debt. It's NYU, not Princeton (and even then, it's debatable how much debt is worth it).

Of course, it's up to you to decide how much money the experience of going to NYU is worth to you, but from a purely cost-efficiency standpoint, it's not worth it for a premed student.
 

Spector1

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I personally don't think the "prestige" of NYU is worth that much debt. It's NYU, not Princeton (and even then, it's debatable how much debt is worth it).

Of course, it's up to you to decide how much money the experience of going to NYU is worth to you, but from a purely cost-efficiency standpoint, it's not worth it for a premed student.
yup private tuition is only maybe worth it if its ivy. Otherwise just go to a good state school.


(or you could be like some people and just tax evasion to get financial aid)
 
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WedgeDawg

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yup private tuition is only maybe worth it if its ivy. Otherwise just go to a good state school.


(or you could be like some people and just tax evasion to get financial aid)
And if it's an Ivy and finances are going to be a trouble for you, you'll probably have your education nicely subsidized by the school too.
 
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Spector1

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And if it's an Ivy and finances are going to be a trouble for you, you'll probably have your education nicely subsidized by the school too.
I knew people who were rich but just didnt report any taxes so they got full rides courtesy of fafsa.
 

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Where you go for undergrad doesn't really matter, I've had many people tell me this.
A 4.0 from say University of Wyoming is better than a 3.0 from M.I.T
 

WedgeDawg

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Where you go for undergrad doesn't really matter, I've had many people tell me this.
Those people are wrong lol

A 4.0 from say University of Wyoming is better than a 3.0 from M.I.T
No one is saying that it is
 

Dr.Sticks

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Those people are wrong lol
Not really..
Sure the M.I.T degree holds more prestige, but do you really think your employer will care?
After the first job nobody cares where you went to college.. Nobody
Nobody cares what you did in college(to a certain extent)
Talking with recruiters, they don't really care where the degree comes from. They want someone with real life experience who can get the job done. Book smarts will not help you be successful, you need street smarts too.

I'm pretty sure many adcoms here will agree with me to a certain extent..

The only reason you see people from top universities at top med schools is because the students who get into top universities continue the same work ethic and get into top med schools. GENERALLY that is..
Always exceptions, always, always, always

Correlation does not equal causation
Top undergrads students generally get into top med schools
False;
The students at top undergrads generally are more competitive..(higher MCAT, GPA, more ECs, etc..)
 

allantois

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Will people from Ivies ever stop self-promoting their education?
 

WedgeDawg

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Okay, I am going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that you're new or that you're just unfortunately misinformed.

Not really..
Sure the M.I.T degree holds more prestige, but do you really think your employer will care?
After the first job nobody cares where you went to college.. Nobody
Nobody cares what you did in college(to a certain extent)
Talking with recruiters, they don't really care where the degree comes from. They want someone with real life experience who can get the job done.
Yeah absolutely. If you look at where top consulting firms recruit from, you'll see it's generally only at selective colleges. As in, they go to campuses of highly competitive schools and court students from there. Same with investment banking firms. Same with computer science firms (but to a less extent than the others mentioned).

If you are looking for literature, here is an article by Karen Ho, a cultural anthropologist, on the culture of Wall Street. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1525/can.2005.20.1.068/asset/can.2005.20.1.068.pdf;jsessionid=84A7B877B86B8A38F36464C509D037F4.f02t03?v=1&t=ie0v8gy4&s=41c13e752c69e793488c99308aa36f0c554a3fa9)

If you don't have access to it for whatever reason, one of the takeaways is that Wall Street maintains its presence of in-group and prestige by recruiting almost exclusively from elite colleges. Here's a quote: " 'We are a Princeton family. I met my wife here. Princeton students make the best analysts, which is why we recruit heavily here.” The other speakers introduced themselves by referring to the schools that they had attended: Harvard, Williams, Harvard, Princeton, Wharton, Princeton, Princeton, Princeton; then the South Asian woman said, “I’m from the University of Chicago; I’m not quite as bright as everyone else.' "

Another: "First, investment bankers begin by addressing “the Princeton family” to establish a connection with the audience and to delineate an elite selectivity— just as not everyone can be a student at Princeton, investment banking is not a profession in which all can participate. From there, bankers move on to talk about “smartness” to establish collective meritocracy as the organizational rationale for investment banking elitism. "

I think you get the point. Or at least, I hope so.

Book smarts will not help you be successful, you need street smarts too.
No one is arguing this.

I'm pretty sure many adcoms here will agree with me to a certain extent..
https://www.aamc.org/students/download/267622/data/mcatstudentselectionguide.pdf#page=12

Page 7: for private schools (which most top schools are, other than schools like Michigan, UCLA, and UCSF), selectivity of undergraduate institution is rated "highest importance". What else is rated highest importance? cGPA, MCAT, sGPA, and postbac performance.


The only reason you see people from top universities at top med schools is because the students who get into top universities continue the same work ethic and get into top med schools.
This is A reason. Not the only reason.

GENERALLY that is..
Always exceptions, always, always, always
The point this was addressing was refuted, so I don't really know what else to say here.

Correlation does not equal causation
Top undergrads students generally get into top med schools
False;
The students at top undergrads generally are more competitive..(higher MCAT, GPA, more ECs, etc..)
"Our acceptance rates at top medical schools are above the national averages, and the number of Princeton students attending top schools has not changed since the institution of the grading policy. Between 35% and 40% of students who matriculated to medical school in the past four years is attending a top 10 US News & World Report research school. "

http://www.princeton.edu/hpa/premed/prospective-students/2013-HPA-Frequently-Asked-Questions.pdf - bottom of page 2

It's a combination of both. Top schools like to inbreed, so they like to take students from other top schools. Does this mean you can't get into Harvard from random state U? It means no such thing. It just means that it's easier to get into a top school (or more top schools) if you excel at Harvard vs. excelling at random state U.

@efle anything to add?
 
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Dr.Sticks

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Okay, I am going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume that you're new or that you're just unfortunately misinformed.



Yeah absolutely. If you look at where top consulting firms recruit from, you'll see it's generally only at selective colleges. As in, they go to campuses of highly competitive schools and court students from there. Same with investment banking firms. Same with computer science firms (but to a less extent than the others mentioned).

If you are looking for literature, here is an article by Karen Ho, a cultural anthropologist, on the culture of Wall Street. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1525/can.2005.20.1.068/asset/can.2005.20.1.068.pdf;jsessionid=84A7B877B86B8A38F36464C509D037F4.f02t03?v=1&t=ie0v8gy4&s=41c13e752c69e793488c99308aa36f0c554a3fa9)

If you don't have access to it for whatever reason, one of the takeaways is that Wall Street maintains its presence of in-group and prestige by recruiting almost exclusively from elite colleges. Here's a quote: " 'We are a Princeton family. I met my wife here. Princeton students make the best analysts, which is why we recruit heavily here.” The other speakers introduced themselves by referring to the schools that they had attended: Harvard, Williams, Harvard, Princeton, Wharton, Princeton, Princeton, Princeton; then the South Asian woman said, “I’m from the University of Chicago; I’m not quite as bright as everyone else.' "

Another: "First, investment bankers begin by addressing “the Princeton family” to establish a connection with the audience and to delineate an elite selectivity— just as not everyone can be a student at Princeton, investment banking is not a profession in which all can participate. From there, bankers move on to talk about “smartness” to establish collective meritocracy as the organizational rationale for investment banking elitism. "

I think you get the point. Or at least, I hope so.



No one is arguing this.


https://www.aamc.org/students/download/267622/data/mcatstudentselectionguide.pdf#page=12

Page 7: for private schools (which most top schools are, other than schools like Michigan, UCLA, and UCSF), selectivity of undergraduate institution is rated "highest importance". What else is rated highest importance? cGPA, MCAT, sGPA, and postbac performance.




This is A reason. Not the only reason.



The point this was addressing was refuted, so I don't really know what else to say here.



"Our acceptance rates at top medical schools are above the national averages, and the number of Princeton students attending top schools has not changed since the institution of the grading policy. Between 35% and 40% of students who matriculated to medical school in the past four years is attending a top 10 US News & World Report research school. "

http://www.princeton.edu/hpa/premed/prospective-students/2013-HPA-Frequently-Asked-Questions.pdf - bottom of page 2

It's a combination of both. Top schools like to inbreed, so they like to take students from other top schools. Does this mean you can't get into Harvard from random state U? It means no such thing. It just means that it's easier to get into a top school (or more top schools) if you excel at Harvard vs. excelling at random state U.

@efle anything to add?

Schools like Princeton, and Harvard can offer you more connections that's the thing. Often the alumni of these schools run these big major corporations.. So guess where they are going to come to recruit? Their Alma Mater.

Also selectivity of schools is very vague.. A lot of schools are selection, and most people don't even know these schools exist.
Take a look..
http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/lowest-acceptance-rate
Ever heard of Alice Lloyd college? I haven't..
 

WedgeDawg

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Schools like Princeton, and Harvard can offer you more connections that's the thing. Often the alumni of these schools run these big major corporations.. So guess where they are going to come to recruit? Their Alma Mater.
My mistake. Clearly it also has no connection to the fact that these schools are the most prestigious, attract the best students, and foster achievement of a select pool of students with enormous potential.

Also selectivity of schools is very vague.. A lot of schools are selection, and most people don't even know these schools exist.
Take a look..
http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/lowest-acceptance-rate
Ever heard of Alice Lloyd college? I haven't..
No, but I have heard of Yale, Stanford, Harvard, Brown, Duke, Penn, MIT, Swarthmore, Northwestern...

Seriously, look at that list on the first page and tell me if you still think this line of reasoning holds any weight.

Clearly "selectivity" can be used as a general proxy for prestige.

Edit: I now see from other threads that you seem to enjoy trolling. If this is a troll, then well done. If it's not, well, consider what having your serious post be mistaken for a troll post says about it.
 
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Dr.Sticks

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My mistake. Clearly it also has no connection to the fact that these schools are the most prestigious, attract the best students, and foster achievement of a select pool of students with enormous potential.



No, but I have heard of Yale, Stanford, Harvard, Brown, Duke, Penn, MIT, Swarthmore, Northwestern...

Seriously, look at that list on the first page and tell me if you still think this line of reasoning holds any weight.

Clearly "selectivity" can be used as a general proxy for prestige.
You have high achieving students everywhere, the fact is these schools have well connected alumni..

Clearly selective is too vague. There is not enough evidence to claim it is code word for prestigious.
Arguably 7-9 colleges are pretty much unknown..
Also I don't think a lot of people associate cal tech with prestige on the level of say UCLA
And the Naval Academy..

Also I wouldn't care what some snobby fools on wall street who don't know how to manage finances think..
(http://www.businessinsider.com/harvard-princeton-and-yale-2011-1)
 

WedgeDawg

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You have high achieving students everywhere, the fact is these schools have well connected alumni..

Clearly selective is too vague. There is not enough evidence to claim it is code word for prestigious.
Arguably 7-9 colleges are pretty much unknown..
Also I don't think a lot of people associate cal tech with prestige on the level of say UCLA
And the Naval Academy..

Also I wouldn't care what some snobby fools on wall street who don't know how to manage finances think..
(http://www.businessinsider.com/harvard-princeton-and-yale-2011-1)
I think selectivity is being used euphemistically in that report.

Also, if you're conceding that alumni connections matter, then how on earth can you argue that where you went to college does not, if those connections are established by going to said college?

Also your link proves my point more than it does yours...
 

Dr.Sticks

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I think selectivity is being used euphemistically in that report.

Also, if you're conceding that alumni connections matter, then how on earth can you argue that where you went to college does not, if those connections are established by going to said college?

Also your link proves my point more than it does yours...
No, it shows you how ridiculous these people are.

Connections don't get you into med school though; Also I did state after your first job it doesn't really matter.

"After the first job nobody cares where you went to college.. Nobody"
"After the first job"
 

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No, it shows you how ridiculous these people are.

Connections don't get you into med school though; Also I did state after your first job it doesn't really matter.
No, but that AAMC survey I linked to supports the claim that undergraduate school matters for med school admission to a non-trivial extent.

"After the first job nobody cares where you went to college.. Nobody"
"After the first job"
Maybe, but it does for that first job, which is what will get you that second job.

It's a lot easier to go from Harvard -> Goldman -> CEO of some firm than Random State U -> Goldman -> CEO of some firm or even Random State U -> random firm -> CEO of some firm.

Everything builds upon the previous step, just like undergrad -> med school -> residency -> fellowship -> attending

It's easier to go Harvard->harvard->harvard->harvard->harvard than it is if any of those steps are not Harvard. Extreme example obviously but you understand my point.
 

Banco

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What do you mean you're planning on going there? Have you applied to colleges yet? If you haven't, then wait for financial aid at least.

They are known to be stingy, but a relative of mine was recently given very generous need based aid from NYU undergrad (>40k), and he is solidly middle class. It can really depend on your personal situation.

If you are enrolling for this fall semester, then what choice do you have at this point but to go there?
 
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Thing about going to Harvard is that the name will help you for sure, but probably more helpful will be the incredible work ethic and general level of intelligence it took for you to get into Harvard. If I'm a CEO or whatever, yeah I'm only going to hire from selective schools, because it's the most risk averse way to hire.
 

vellez

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For many, many schools (most probably), I'm 100% convinced that a pricy private UG education is WHOLLY unnecessary wrt getting into medical school. Maybe if you wanted to work on Wall Street, NYU would be "worth" it.
 

Spector1

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For many, many schools (most probably), I'm 100% convinced that a pricy private UG education is WHOLLY unnecessary wrt getting into medical school. Maybe if you wanted to work on Wall Street, NYU would be "worth" it.
yeah, the only undergrad program at NYU worth anything close to private school tuition (and even then its debatable) is Stern
 

Spector1

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No, but that AAMC survey I linked to supports the claim that undergraduate school matters for med school admission to a non-trivial extent.



Maybe, but it does for that first job, which is what will get you that second job.

It's a lot easier to go from Harvard -> Goldman -> CEO of some firm than Random State U -> Goldman -> CEO of some firm or even Random State U -> random firm -> CEO of some firm.

Everything builds upon the previous step, just like undergrad -> med school -> residency -> fellowship -> attending

It's easier to go Harvard->harvard->harvard->harvard->harvard than it is if any of those steps are not Harvard. Extreme example obviously but you understand my point.
Isn't that more a result of signalling rather than a representation of the quality of education one receives from said Ivy league institution?
 

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NYU's stingy attitude towards financial aid leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Save it for the rich child stars who go there and go to a cheaper school.
 

johnnytest

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NYU is annoying. Their tuition is ridiculously high and their fin aid is crappy. Their housing is a joke. You have to pay to apply for housing and then the housing is literally a studio room with someone else. I got accepted to NYU for undergrad and a full-ride at a public university. I chose the full-ride at the public univ. and was debt-free out of college. Now, I'm at Sinai for med-school. Granted, NYU offers so much more to its students than my public university ever could but, I wouldn't really have cared for all that extravagance. It's up to you what your priorities are.
 

Spector1

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NYU is annoying. Their tuition is ridiculously high and their fin aid is crappy. Their housing is a joke. You have to pay to apply for housing and then the housing is literally a studio room with someone else. I got accepted to NYU for undergrad and a full-ride at a public university. I chose the full-ride at the public univ. and was debt-free out of college. Now, I'm at Sinai for med-school. Granted, NYU offers so much more to its students than my public university ever could but, I wouldn't really have cared for all that extravagance. It's up to you what your priorities are.
Hey but I heard the girls are hotter at NYU
 
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GiveMeThatMD

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Unless the paper they printed it on was 8-ply, there's absolutely no reason to drop $200,000 on a sheet of toilet paper.
 

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