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OB/GYN NP to OB/GYN?

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oxcazybabexo

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I'm new to this forum. I thought about being a OB/GYN nurse Practitioner then go to be a OB/GYN. I was wondering if anyone would know how I can do that?
 

corpsmanUP

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oxcazybabexo said:
I'm new to this forum. I thought about being a OB/GYN nurse Practitioner then go to be a OB/GYN. I was wondering if anyone would know how I can do that?

certainly. simply become an RN (2 years)
+ work for a couple of years (not always required)
apply to medical school (1-2 years)
attend medical school (4 years)
train in an OBGYN residency (4 years)

= 12 years minimum. And since most RN's never take the pre-reqs for medical school, you might need to add an additional year or 2 for those and for applying.

Bottom line...there are no short cuts, and there are no connections or bridges between the 2 professions. You might just want to pick one or the other.
 

starayamoskva

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corpsmanUP said:
certainly. simply become an RN (2 years)
+ work for a couple of years (not always required)
apply to medical school (1-2 years)
attend medical school (4 years)
train in an OBGYN residency (4 years)

= 12 years minimum. And since most RN's never take the pre-reqs for medical school, you might need to add an additional year or 2 for those and for applying.

Bottom line...there are no short cuts, and there are no connections or bridges between the 2 professions. You might just want to pick one or the other.

Actually to become a nurse practitioner, you need a BS degree in Nursing (4 years) + 2 years experience + Master's program (minimum of 1 year). Then you have to take the courses you need for med school that were not included in nursing school So we will say at least 1 year (then you can work while in school). Ok now we are down to med school, 4 years and residency for OBGyn another 4 years. A grand total of 16 years plus any extra that are required to get accepted into med school.

IF you know you want to be a physician and there are no compelling reasons that you cannot go to med school right now then just do it!
 

oxcazybabexo

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starayamoskva said:
Actually to become a nurse practitioner, you need a BS degree in Nursing (4 years) + 2 years experience + Master's program (minimum of 1 year). Then you have to take the courses you need for med school that were not included in nursing school So we will say at least 1 year (then you can work while in school). Ok now we are down to med school, 4 years and residency for OBGyn another 4 years. A grand total of 16 years plus any extra that are required to get accepted into med school.

IF you know you want to be a physician and there are no compelling reasons that you cannot go to med school right now then just do it!

I know a OB/GYN NP takes 2 yrs for RN 2 yrs for BSN and 2 yrs for specialty(roughly). OB/GYn takes 4 yrs for premed 4 yrs for med skool and 4 yrs for residency(roughly). My question was is there away to go from OB/GYN NP to OB/GYN, however sum1 previous actually answered that and I apprentice it!
 

oxcazybabexo

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corpsmanUP said:
certainly. simply become an RN (2 years)
+ work for a couple of years (not always required)
apply to medical school (1-2 years)
attend medical school (4 years)
train in an OBGYN residency (4 years)

= 12 years minimum. And since most RN's never take the pre-reqs for medical school, you might need to add an additional year or 2 for those and for applying.

Bottom line...there are no short cuts, and there are no connections or bridges between the 2 professions. You might just want to pick one or the other.

Thx for your help. You actually helped me. I just now have to decide if I want to be a OB/GYN or a OB/GYN NP. My problem is OB/GYNs seem like they want you in and hurry up and push you out the door. I dont know they reason but I wouldnt want to be a person like that. I wonder if I could be a OB/GYn that really cares and not just there for the money and pushing ppl out the door.
 

corpsmanUP

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oxcazybabexo said:
Thx for your help. You actually helped me. I just now have to decide if I want to be a OB/GYN or a OB/GYN NP. My problem is OB/GYNs seem like they want you in and hurry up and push you out the door. I dont know they reason but I wouldnt want to be a person like that. I wonder if I could be a OB/GYn that really cares and not just there for the money and pushing ppl out the door.

The bottom line is that you are who you are. If you are a caring person and want to spend time with your patients, that will not change when you become a physician. Its the external forces that lead people to develop that type of care model, such as the difference between making 250K per year and 350K per year if you work fast. To some that is a big motivating factor. My suggestion would be to go the RN route, but in the process take the "big boy" science courses instead of the "sciences for nursing majors" to make sure you won't have to repeat them later. Get yourself a BSN degree with at least bio1/2, chem 1/2 under your belt so that if you decided after working as an RN that you were ready to be the doctor, you would only have to take the organic and physics courses and take the MCAT. You could conceivably do all this in one year while working as an RN. You could work in OBGYN as an RN (where honestly RN's do more than NP's because midwives are more prevalent) and then decide which route to take. You will know real quick if you want to be an OBGYN or an NP or midwife. And to many medical schools, an RN with a strong science GPA is a big plus, and would allow you a few points lower on your MCAT likely. It would also depend on where you apply. RN is a great springboard in my opinion to medicine if you are unsure you want to go into full fledged medicine. My buddy in my class is an RN and has actually worked all through medical school and still maintained a top 10 position in the class.
 

tiredmom

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I was an RN in L&D/ Women's surgery for 4 years before entering medical school... now in 3rd year. For BSN, at least in Texas, you have to take gen chem 1/2, plus several biology classes (a/p, micro, pathophys, etc). When I decided to go back to school, all I needed to take was OrgChem 1/2, Physics 1/2, and Calculus (which I didn't really need because my statistics class counted everywhere I applied but UTHouston). I've known too many NP's having to work regular nursing shifts on the weekends to make enough money to pay their bills. The experience nursing brought to the table really helps, but if you know for sure you want to go to medical school, go straight through. You can get a BSN, and make decent money picking up shifts on the weekends through the first two years (if your study habits make that possible).
Good luck!
 
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