1. SDN Mobile is now free on iTunes and on the Google Play Store. Enjoy!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, be sure to check out How To Get Into Dental School, our free downloadable PDF with step-by-step details for dental school applicants!
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Ochem Help???

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by Beagle, Jul 21, 2002.

  1. Beagle

    Beagle Meet BEAGLE
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2001
    Messages:
    596
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can someone explain Huckal's rule to me?
    I have no idea how to find out of a molecule is aromatic or not.
    Kaplans book isn't of much help with this stuff(to me anyway)
    Thanks !!!
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. DesiDentist

    DesiDentist G. S. Khurana, DMD, MBA
    Moderator Emeritus Vendor 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2001
    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Dentist
    From my understanding you can use huckles rule if you see all of the aromatic compounds are cyclic (joined) and conjugated then you can use 4n+2 (Huckles rule) so if you had a benzene ring with 3 double bonds you know that those three double bonds have 6 e- so you can put the equation like this:

    6=4n+2
    -2 -2
    ________
    4=4n

    4/4 =n

    n = 1

    so benzene is aromatic since n= a whole number

    If there was a cyclic compound with 8 e- or 4 double bonds then the equation would be:


    8=4n+2
    -2 -2
    ________

    6=4n

    6/4 =n which is not a whole number, thus not aromatic. But use huckles rule only after ruling out the first two criteria:

    1.) cyclic
    2.) conjugation

    Hope this helps,

    DesiDentist
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page