q1we3

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I am sure many amongst the general population confuse ODs as medical eye specialist or eye surgeons. How does that make OMDs feel? Do you think its important that patient be made aware that they are not visiting an eye specialist? If yes how should ODs introduce themselves to patients?
 

RestoreSight

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The general confusion between ODs and OMDs in the public setting is too ingrained to change IMO. Optometrists are doctors of optometry and many are excellent clinicians who have every right to introduce themselves as a doctor. I think confusion comes when the limits of their role become known to patients. "Oh, why can't you prescribe me that? I thought you were a doctor?" I think for most routine patient care scenarios introducing yourself as a doctor of optometry is sufficient without having to go into tremendous detail about scope of practice, unless the patient specifically asks or the case management is outside your scope of care.
 

namams

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I noticed the abbreviation "OMD" is, for the overwhelming majority of the time, used by optometrists/optometry students when referring to ophthalmologists.

I haven't seen it used in any other forums, and only rarely see ophthalmologists referring to themselves as such. (Usually when directly responding to someone in optometry...reference post above.)

Question: Is this bastardized abbreviation used by OD's as some sort of subtle degradation tactic?

For example, CRNA's apparently love to refer to anesthesiologists as "MDA's"...
Supposedly to both blur the line between their degree and the medical doctor (CRNA = MDA) and to easier mask reality for patients (read: crna sponsored advertisements claiming equivalence to "MDA's").

So is this "OMD" thing similar? "Hey, OMD looks a lot more like "OD" than "MD" does. Cool, let's call them that then!"

Just curious. Is this abbreviation propagated in optometry school curriculum?

To the general public, OMD often leads one to think "Oriental Medicine Doctor". Yes, acupuncture.
No it's not used as a 'degradation tactic' it's just easier to type OMD instead of ophthalmologist.
 

PBEA

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from what I recall "OMD" is something that OMD's came up with, and yeah its easier to type. Now go troll somewhere else.
 

Eyefixer

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AND

HERE

THEY

GO

AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


:beat::beat::beat:





from what I recall "OMD" is something that OMD's came up with, and yeah its easier to type. Now go troll somewhere else.
 

Eyefixer

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So... Are you an ophthalmologist that frequently refers to himself as an "OMD"? (Your status doesn't indicate which profession you belong to.)
He is not an ophthalmologist, he just plays one on TV :laugh:
 

KHE

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What is the point of this thread, other than to stir up hard feelings?

Honestly...I have never introduced myself as a "doctor of optometry." I introduce myself as Dr. KHE. But the word "optometry" and "optometrist" appears all over my signage, my door, my intake forms, my walls, my business cards, it's literally everywhere in my office. I'm not sure what more I could do.
 

PBEA

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Interesting... so ophthalmologists came up with it? I wouldn't have guessed that being the case since they never seem to use it. Do you remember where you recalled this from (?) -- not that I don't believe you, I'm just curious to see the source.

Oh yeah and it was 100% trolling; I definitely didn't provide any analogous real world examples to base my inquiry off of, right? Also, I'm probably way off topic by asking this question [pertaining to what ophthalmologists are referred to] in the "ophthalmology forum", huh?

So... Are you an ophthalmologist that frequently refers to himself as an "OMD"? (Your status doesn't indicate which profession you belong to.)
they also came up with "eye MD" but they dont use that either. I'm an OD....and "real world examples" notwithstanding, you are obviously trolling for action on a topic you couldnt possibly have a clue about.
 

Eyefixer

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they also came up with "eye MD" but they dont use that either. I'm an OD....and "real world examples" notwithstanding, you are obviously trolling for action on a topic you couldnt possibly have a clue about.
THEY also came out with optometric physician, right?
 

mydodger

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THEY also came out with optometric physician, right?
Yeah, the "optometric physician" label is purposefully misleading. I've got a buddy in family practice that I think I'm going to teach to do refractions and hire him as a "Physician Optometrist." It's idiotic. Optometrists are not physicians. Physicians are not Optometrists. It is misleading to the public when an Optometrist bills themselves as a "physician" and those who use the term "optometric physician" do it on purpose.
 

Eyefixer

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Here is another interesting read for ya:

State lacks doctors to meet demand of national healthcare law
Lawmakers are working on proposals that would enable physician assistants, nurse practitioners, optometrists and pharmacists to diagnose, treat and manage some illnesses.
February 09, 2013|By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Or is it? One major obstacle is that there won't be enough doctors to… (Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images )SACRAMENTO — As the state moves to expand healthcare coverage to millions of Californians under President Obama's healthcare law, it faces a major obstacle: There aren't enough doctors to treat a crush of newly insured patients.

Some lawmakers want to fill the gap by redefining who can provide healthcare.

They are working on proposals that would allow physician assistants to treat more patients and nurse practitioners to set up independent practices. Pharmacists and optometrists could act as primary care providers, diagnosing and managing some chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and high-blood pressure.


"We're going to be mandating that every single person in this state have insurance," said state Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina), chairman of the Senate Health Committee and leader of the effort to expand professional boundaries. "What good is it if they are going to have a health insurance card but no access to doctors?"

Hernandez's proposed changes, which would dramatically shake up the medical establishment in California, have set off a turf war with physicians that could contribute to the success or failure of the federal Affordable Care Act in California.

Doctors say giving non-physicians more authority and autonomy could jeopardize patient safety. It could also drive up costs, because those workers, who have less medical education and training, tend to order more tests and prescribe more antibiotics, they said.

"Patient safety should always trump access concerns," said Dr. Paul Phinney, president of the California Medical Assn.

Such "scope-of-practice" fights are flaring across the country as states brace for an influx of patients into already strained healthcare systems. About 350 laws altering what health professionals may do have been enacted nationwide in the last two years, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Since Jan. 1, more than 50 additional proposals have been launched in 24 states.

As the nation's earliest and most aggressive adopter of the healthcare overhaul, California faces more pressure than many states. Diana Dooley, secretary of the state Health and Human Services Agency, said in an interview that expanding some professionals' roles was among the options policymakers should explore to help meet the expected demand.

At a meeting of healthcare advocates in December, she had offered a more blunt assessment.

"We're going to have to provide care at lower levels," she told the group. "I think a lot of people are trained to do work that our licenses don't allow them to."

Currently, just 16 of California's 58 counties have the federal government's recommended supply of primary care physicians, with the Inland Empire and the San Joaquin Valley facing the worst shortages. In addition, nearly 30% of the state's doctors are nearing retirement age, the highest percentage in the nation, according to the Assn. of American Medical Colleges.

Physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists and optometrists agree that they have more training than they are allowed to use.

"We don't have enough providers," said Beth Haney, president of the California Assn. for Nurse Practitioners, "...so we should increase access to the ones that we have."

Hernandez, who said he would introduce his legislation and hold a hearing on the issue next month, said his own experience as an optometrist shows the need to empower more practitioners. He said he often sees Medicaid patients who come to his La Puente practice because they have failed their vision test at the DMV. Many complain of constant thirst and frequent urination.


"I know it's diabetes," he said. But he is not allowed to diagnose or treat it and must refer those patients elsewhere. Many of them may face a months-long wait to see a doctor.

The California Medical Assn. says healthcare professionals should not exceed their training. Phinney, a pediatrician, said physician assistants and other mid-level professionals are best deployed in doctor-led teams. They can perform routine exams and prescribe medications in consultation with physicians on the premises or by teleconference.

Allowing certain health workers to set up independent practices would create voids in the clinics, hospitals and offices where they now work, he said. "It's more like moving the deck chairs around rather than solving the problem," Phinney said.

His group proposes a different solution: It wants more funding to expand participation in a loan repayment program for recent medical school graduates. Doctors can now receive up to $105,000 in return for practicing in underserved communities for three years.

Still, it typically takes a decade to train a physician. Health experts say the pool of graduates cannot keep pace.

We're not going to produce thousands of additional doctors in any kind of short-term time frame," said Assemblyman Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento). "It makes sense to look at changes that could relieve the pressure that we're going to undoubtedly encounter for access to care."

Administrators of community clinics and public hospitals say nurse practitioners and other non-physician providers already play key roles in caring for patients, a trend they predict will grow as more Californians become insured and enter the healthcare system.


At Kern Medical Center in Kern County, two clinical pharmacists have run the hospital's diabetes clinic, treating about 500 patients a year, since the specialist physician in charge retired. They are licensed to perform physicals, order lab tests, prescribe medicines and counsel patients on lifestyle changes.

"We're going to have to get a whole lot more creative about how care is provided," said Paul Hensler, Kern Medical Center's chief executive.

[email protected]
 

PBEA

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THEY also came out with optometric physician, right?
oh so you wanna beat the dead horse some more? or dont you already know the reason why that term came into use? hint: it doesnt involve a conspiracy to fool the public.......as if they needed any help:rolleyes:
 

PBEA

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Yeah, the "optometric physician" label is purposefully misleading. I've got a buddy in family practice that I think I'm going to teach to do refractions and hire him as a "Physician Optometrist." It's idiotic. Optometrists are not physicians. Physicians are not Optometrists. It is misleading to the public when an Optometrist bills themselves as a "physician" and those who use the term "optometric physician" do it on purpose.
boy they sure start the brainwashing early in med school dont they.......now wipe the snot of your nose and run off to class now, dont forget an apple for the teacher.
 

mydodger

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boy they sure start the brainwashing early in med school dont they.......now wipe the snot of your nose and run off to class now, dont forget an apple for the teacher.
Not as early as they start brainwashing Optometry students to think that their education is as rigorous and in depth as a real physician's. Like, OMG, we should totally be able to do surgeries you guys!

Do they tell you guys to interrupt Ophthalmology forums as an act of subversion too? I bet you get gold stars for posting in threads like this.
 

PBEA

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Not as early as they start brainwashing Optometry students to think that their education is as rigorous and in depth as a real physician's. Like, OMG, we should totally be able to do surgeries you guys!

Do they tell you guys to interrupt Ophthalmology forums as an act of subversion too? I bet you get gold stars for posting in threads like this.
yes to all the above, in fact I thought about draining a retrobulbar heme the other day, figured I'd just get one of dem sharp thingies and poke it through the ear. If I go deep enough Im sure to hit paydirt eventually.......one problem tho. I havent done the required 10 minute wet lab to you know, really polish my technique. O well, Ill just watch it on youtube, I wont even need to wash my hands or anything. The part time bartender teaching the lab wont mind, he's totally cool about it. He says stuff like "aint this easy", and "look you should just call yourself an eye surgeon because you are so smart". Problem solved, you know the saying see one, do one, teach one................
 

rocketbooster

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Enough. No ophtho ppl give a **** about optometrists or about your dreams of being our equal despite your less education and training.

Lock this thread and be done with it. We dont need more Shnureks invading and trying to ruin our board.
 

Eyefixer

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Enough. No ophtho ppl give a **** about optometrists or about your dreams of being our equal despite your less education and training.

Lock this thread and be done with it. We dont need more Shnureks invading and trying to ruin our board.
Oh ****, you mentioned his name....:scared:
 

odieoh

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Now to really mix things up, what are you going to call an Osteopathic doc (DO) who becomes an ophthalmologist? And to further muddy the waters, how about an optometrist who then went on to become a DO, and then became an ophthalmologist?
 

Dusn

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I'd call them Osteopathic Ophthalmologists, or "Double Os." And then I'd shorten the "Double O" even further to D.O.


To answer the OPs questions, we're just MDs, not OMDs.
 

JMK2005

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I personally dislike OMD. refer to ophthalmology or ophth.

I am also confused when I see "ocular health" on optometrists' note. what the heck does that mean.
 

PBEA

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I'm fairly certain OMD is really only ever used on chat boards like this........never professionally. Try not to take it personally.
 

RestoreSight

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What's the big deal what the abbreviation is? Ophth, OMD, the Big O, who cares? It's more important what you are actually doing. A title is just pomp and circumstance.
 

orbitsurgMD

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Now to really mix things up, what are you going to call an Osteopathic doc (DO) who becomes an ophthalmologist? And to further muddy the waters, how about an optometrist who then went on to become a DO, and then became an ophthalmologist?
Doood!
 
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I'd call them Osteopathic Ophthalmologists, or "Double Os." And then I'd shorten the "Double O" even further to D.O.


To answer the OPs questions, we're just MDs, not OMDs.
:laugh: I wish I knew a DO optho because that's pretty funny.