goldenmug8

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May 22, 2010
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Sending individual emails is excessive, and frankly it's hard to even find all the actual and WORKING emails for each program. No program director will double-check and go looking up your paper on pubmed, they are way to busy as it is looking at 400+ applications.

If you get an interview and they ask you about the journal and article specifically, I would obviously fess-up your mistake but spin it in a good light.
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
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Apr 25, 2005
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Sending individual emails is excessive, and frankly it's hard to even find all the actual and WORKING emails for each program. No program director will double-check and go looking up your paper on pubmed, they are way to busy as it is looking at 400+ applications.

If you get an interview and they ask you about the journal and article specifically, I would obviously fess-up your mistake but spin it in a good light.
Second this. Don't sweat it, bring a copy of updated cv on interviews in case you have anything to add.
 
Oct 20, 2013
15
1
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Medical Student
Yes I agree, leave this as is and address in interview if it comes up. It's minor and i think you could do yourself more harm by emailing ppl and letting them know about the mistake. good luck!
 

docta9

2+ Year Member
May 21, 2015
97
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My app has been turned in and distributed to 61 programs for several weeks now. Obviously I can't go back and change it. I am concerned programs will double-check my pubs only to see the mistake and wonder if I am trying to deceive them (which I obviously am not) and miss out on interviews.
...Any advice is well appreciated.
This is potentially nothing or potentially very serious. If your ophthalmology chairman wants to destroy your life and career, this could be used by lawyers to terminate you. Don't laugh. There are people littered among the roadside that have been destroyed.

At your first available opportunity, I would put it in writing that an abstract was mistakenly placed in the publications section. You could include that with other topics in your letter. Keep a copy of that letter or e-mail for life. If e-mail, print a copy. When you finish ophthalmology residency, you can throw out all those copies except for the program you went to. No joke. Documentation is everything in these modern days.
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
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Apr 25, 2005
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Anyone can be destroyed by anyone for any reason if someone is out to get you. So let's not be all Debbie downer. As someone else mentioned program directors have 400 apps to read. I doubt they will cross reference your publications. If they do, that's pretty lame.

Alerting programs at this time will only cause confusion and make people suspicious. Addressing this if the publication is discussed or any publications are brought up is much more appropriate. In addition, they will have a face to your name. The nice thing about this situation is even tho you listed it in the wrong place the pub is actually a submitted manuscript so it's not that big of a mistake.

I know this is a stressful time, but you will be ok. Don't let people worry you and freak you out. Worrying doesn't help anyone.
 

docta9

2+ Year Member
May 21, 2015
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I agree with DrZeke above regarding not to worry. However, I would put the correction somewhere in writing before they rank you. This is to offer some sort of protection. Your explanation can be as short as one sentence and can be in a letter with other information. However, do not blow it off and take a risk that your career will be destroyed.
 

docta9

2+ Year Member
May 21, 2015
97
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Anyone can be destroyed by anyone for any reason if someone is out to get you. So let's not be all Debbie downer.
Not true. In medical school, one faculty was out to destroy me to the point of fabricating evidence. Lawyers got involved. That person was not successful in ending my career but he tried very hard and would have been successful in many cases.
 

DrZeke

yzarc gniog ylwolS
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Not true. In medical school, one faculty was out to destroy me to the point of fabricating evidence. Lawyers got involved. That person was not successful in ending my career but he tried very hard and would have been successful in many cases.
What I mean is that anyone can come after you, if they want to. That doesn't mean they will and it doesn't mean they will win. Whether or not they are right or succeed it's very stressful. I don't think you need to terrify the OP just because someone had a vendetta against you. I'm sure the circumstances were specific and unique and are not the exact same as the OP situation.