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OMM at AZCOM and other schools

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by William_Trask, Nov 12, 2001.

  1. William_Trask

    William_Trask Junior Member
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    After interviewing at DMU, WesternCOMP, and AZCOM, I am extremely excited to learn OMM. The studies I have read, all conclude OMM is a helpful therapy that will decrease pain and health care cost. I haven't specifically had OMT, but other that I know love the treatment.

    So what I'm getting at is…

    During a typical Osteopathic education, does OMM seem like "just another class" or are all the science classes "just other classes"? I am specifically interested in AZCOM, but will all students comment on their respective schools.

    One additional though, if OMM seems like "just another classes" and you were to do it all over again, would you go the allopathic route and learn OMM through continuing education?
     
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  3. shep

    shep Junior Member
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    Good questions. I am a first year at AZCOM and just finished first quarter. Here are my thoughts on the matter.
    First, OMM is tied to the underlying philosophy and thought processes that a DO uses when he/she treats a patient. I'm sure an MD could learn the mechanics of the techniques and may become proficient enough to treat with those techniques. Many allopathic doctors also may have a similar philosophy as osteopaths but from my experience with allopathic medicine, the pharmacy is often (not always) the first treatment option; not OMM.
    I really see no reason why an allopathic physician could not learn the techniques BUT a DO is taught the OMM thought process from day one and refines it through 4+ years. It really is the thought process and combined experiences that builds a good OMM focused physician.
    It is kind of an art and you will be amazed at the things you can "feel" with your hands through practice. Practice is the key word.
    By the end of the first quarter, you will begin to have enough anatomy to visualize what you are really doing with the OMM techniques and how they are working. Prior to that, OMM is a little disconected from the other courses. But, by the end of the first quarter you begin to tie concepts together. At least that's how it was for me.
    I'd like to bring up a point regarding continuing education. I personally think that to be good at OMM you must have it tied into your education to begin with. That way you see the crossover(s) b/t OMM and physiology, anatomy, etc... If OMM is not tied into your medical education from beginning to end you will miss some very important points/concepts. That being said, anyone could learn the mechanics of the techniques but I would not consider that CONTINUING education. I would consider it a beginning.
     
  4. KCOM2005

    KCOM2005 Senior Member
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    The funny thing about OMM (OTM here at KCOM) is that it seems to add another facet to my overall learning. The school boasts so much about having an integrated curriculum here, and they really do. What we do in OTM is fundamentally tied into what we are doing in our other classes, making it easier to learn. By training your hands and mind to work together you will become a nicely rounded physician who isn't afraid to treat and/or touch someone. It helps solidify concepts from other classes.

    Hey, nice to see some people from back home. I miss Colorado.
     
  5. William_Trask

    William_Trask Junior Member
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    Shep,

    You made a very good point about the education process and I agree with you completely. I have recently been accepted to AZCOM and wanted to make sure that the OMM at this school was "not just another class." Is that your general consensus?

    How would you compare the quality of OMM education at AZCOM to that of other osteopathic schools?

    Does AZCOM have an OMM fellowship program, and 2nd year TAs for the teaching of the class?

    I saw the size of the OMM lab, and was curious if you believe you have enough supervision/instruction to properly learn the techniques?

    Thanks for your assistance!
     
  6. tedsadoc2002

    tedsadoc2002 Senior Member
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    Hi,

    There are usually 2 fellowship positions that you can apply for in your second year. From the policies in the past, I can tell you that the graduating class before mine only had one fellow due to some budgetary constraint. I was told that hopefully that would not occur again. To respond to your second question, yes second years act as TA's for the first years in OMM. If you opt to rotate as a third year with Dr. William Devine or Dr. Shoup in the OMM specialty clinic, you would also participate in the OMM lab. Hope this helps.
     
  7. muonwhiz

    muonwhiz Senior Member
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    I agree with the above posters.At AZCOM there are fellowships for upper level students, I am not sure exactly what you must do to qualify for one. We have plenty of supervision and instruction in our OMM lab. The class is split up into groups alphabetically and when you go into the lab your group is assigned a certain section of the lab. For instance, the group with last names starting from T through Z might be assigned to area P. These areas contain a sufficient number of tables for the group to work with. You are also assigned a partner in your group to work with/on. Both the lab areas and partners change every week, so you get to work on quite a few people. In each area, there is at least one faculty member assigned, and they go around and help answer questions and give technique pointers. Fellows and Ta's are also assigned in an area. They all wear red shirts so they are easy to spot and call over when help is needed. I have not heard of anyone in the OMM lab having any trouble getting help from the doctors, fellows or TA's when needed. You will have a fun time with the class. It only meets once a week. But there is a student OMM club that meets on Saturdays in the lab and gives extra practice opportunities. There are also tables set up outside of some of the lecture halls and these get frequent use by students working on each other. It is helpful during test times to be able to help each other out with a little OMM to relieve those tight muscles!
     

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