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One question regarding Osteoclast and Osteoblast from Destroyer

ColumbiaOrtho

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2015
53
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  1. Pre-Dental
    Hello, I just have one question about ossification process. One problem from Destroyer asks which would be true about the stress being placed on the bones after a marathon runner ran 100 miles in a race. The answer choice A was "Osteoclastic activity increases, and calcium phosphate is removed from the bone". The answer choice B was "Osteoblastic activity increases, and calcium phosphate is released into the matrix". The correct answer was B, but I do not see why answer choice A is wrong. I thought during the ossification, the bone first gets resorbed by osteoclasts, which break down the bone and increases calcium concentration in the blood, and then gets deposited by osteoblasts. Wouldn't putting a consistent force induce an osteoclastic activity first? Sorry if this is a dumb question but I haven't taken physiology yet so I am pretty ignorant on this subject. Thank you.
     
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    teenteen

    Full Member
    2+ Year Member
    May 1, 2016
    33
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    1. Pre-Dental
      Hello, I just have one question about ossification process. One problem from Destroyer asks which would be true about the stress being placed on the bones after a marathon runner ran 100 miles in a race. The answer choice A was "Osteoclastic activity increases, and calcium phosphate is removed from the bone". The answer choice B was "Osteoblastic activity increases, and calcium phosphate is released into the matrix". The correct answer was B, but I do not see why answer choice A is wrong. I thought during the ossification, the bone first gets resorbed by osteoclasts, which break down the bone and increases calcium concentration in the blood, and then gets deposited by osteoblasts. Wouldn't putting a consistent force induce an osteoclastic activity first? Sorry if this is a dumb question but I haven't taken physiology yet so I am pretty ignorant on this subject. Thank you.
      I used to get stuck on this question too but the way I think about it is that osteoblasts build bone. So since there's been stress put on the bone the runners body actually needs to build more bone to make up for all the minerals or "bone" he used while running. Whereas osteoclasts break apart bone and release all the minerals back into blood. There's already been stress put on this persons bone so why would they break it up even more! So the body just builds bone with osteoblast to make up for the minerals lost. Does that make sense?
       
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