OT wishing to be a PT

Discussion in 'Physical Therapy' started by DMStudiezOT, Mar 1, 2018.

  1. DMStudiezOT

    2+ Year Member

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    Hello. This may be a little out there, but is there anyone with experience changing from being a licensed OT to a DPT? As I figured, there are no transitional programs between the two, and it seems as though I'd have to start all over school wise :/
     
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  3. 2234leej

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    I do not know anyone who has made the switch; however, if you ever did become a PT-OT, you'd be an amazing clinician with a diverse skillset.
     
  4. Fiveoboy11

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    this would be a very stupid move
     
  5. Doc-PT

    Doc-PT SDN Gold Donor
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    It would indeed give you a broad scope as a clinician but, unfortunately, the transition would be costly and you wouldn’t see a return on your investment. Currently, attaining a DPT does not increase salary from that of a PT and, especially in an inpatient setting, OTs make a very comparable salary to PTs (only we were foolish enough to pay a heap load more for our degrees). The APTA has not yet addressed the major glaring problem with the transition to a DPT: student debt vs actual income potential—it is WAY out of proportion. With the amount we pay to get our degrees we shouldn’t accept salaries less than 80-85k starting out (regardless of setting) but PTs are often starting in the 60k range (namely outpatient settings). I would think long and hard before making this expensive leap into a parallel career that offers approximately the same salaries...If you’re looking for a change have you considered PA? This may actually be less years of schooling (less debt) and significantly better income potential. I love my job but the earning potential just isn’t what it should be with a clinical doctorate under my belt.
     
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  6. maddaddam

    maddaddam O-T-R? I don't even know 'er!

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    You can be in so many different settings as an OT, though... like if you prefer a more biomechanical focus you could do hands, if you like mobility you could work in seating, etc. I'm sure you've considered these things already, so... why do you want to switch?
     
  7. Ndebt

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    I’m just curious but what makes you like PT better than OT


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  8. noyceguy

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    This would be a very expensive and overall unwise career transition.
     
  9. Yurop

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    The raise in pay would be negligible (and in fact might have you in the red for years) and your profession already implements a lot of the same scopes of medical application. PA would probably be a more lucrative endeavor.
     
  10. PTRehab

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  11. PTRehab

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    My CI is actually a OT/PT. Went to St Augustine. I learned a HUGE amount from her. I'm graduating as an OTA and then moving to PT school next year. I always did more "PT" type interventions and even tho she knew I wasn't supposed to let me go a lot of the time. The combo really and I mean "REALLY" strenghtens your skillset. To understand both professions sets you apart from other clinicians. There were rehab managers I interviewed with that didn't know a lot of the techniques I learned in school. I had about 3 PT teachers in my OTA program.
     
  12. Fiveoboy11

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    St. Augustine is the only school I know of that allows one to go to "PT" and "OT" school at the same time and allow you to take each board to become licensed as both. If you want to go to that school and overpay and be a "OT/PT" as you say then go for it. Seems idiotic even with that path, let alone becoming a OT and then going back and becoming a PT which is several levels more stupid. Regardless of how much you think you learn extra or any other skills you think you have it's nonsense. Why not become a physician and do two residencies? My as well do PT school and go thru 3 residencies and fellowships to maximize what you learn and the skills you have. As a not so genius once said: "1+1=potato, makes sense." Just pick one and then masquerade as the other a bit if it makes you feel better.
     

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