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P.a. & A.a.

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Marsdgrove33133

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Hello there people. I am wondering. How does it benefit a P.A. to go back to school and become an A.A? I know there is a salary increase but how about in job duties and, would an A.A. get paid more also being a PA or does it not matter? Have you guys ever heard of someone working as a PA and A.A at the same time? For example can a PA work simultaneously as an A.A. ? Does that even exist? :confused:

Thanks,

Mars:thumbup:
 
D

deleted6669

Hello there people. I am wondering. How does it benefit a P.A. to go back to school and become an A.A? I know there is a salary increase but how about in job duties and, would an A.A. get paid more also being a PA or does it not matter? Have you guys ever heard of someone working as a PA and A.A at the same time? For example can a PA work simultaneously as an A.A. ? Does that even exist? :confused:

Thanks,

Mars:thumbup:

OK, a few questions here-
a pa who goes back to school to be an aa can do and get paid for doing operative anesthesia. aa training is equivalent in every way to crna training and they compete or the same jobs. currently aa's can only work in 15 states. this is increasing yearly.
there are dual pa/aa folks out there who have done both programs. there is currently a bridge program from pa to aa but it only takes off 1 semerster and is fairly new. the dual folks out there now have done both programs in total.
a pa/aa could work in the o.r. doing anesthesia and in any setting that a pa could work so they might find themselves working in more than 1 job( er 2 days/week, o.r. 2 days/week) or for an anesthesia/critical care group where they could cover the icu and the o.r.( in this setting they would probably make more than someone with just 1 cert).
doing both involves around 4 yrs of school after college so you might as well become an md/do at that point in my mind unless you worked as a pa or aa for a few yrs and decided you really wanted to do the duties of the other.
if at the beginning of your career and considering both I would do medschool instead. hope thatanswers your questions.
-e
 

Marsdgrove33133

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OK, a few questions here-
a pa who goes back to school to be an aa can do and get paid for doing operative anesthesia. aa training is equivalent in every way to crna training and they compete or the same jobs. currently aa's can only work in 15 states. this is increasing yearly.
there are dual pa/aa folks out there who have done both programs. there is currently a bridge program from pa to aa but it only takes off 1 semerster and is fairly new. the dual folks out there now have done both programs in total.
a pa/aa could work in the o.r. doing anesthesia and in any setting that a pa could work so they might find themselves working in more than 1 job( er 2 days/week, o.r. 2 days/week) or for an anesthesia/critical care group where they could cover the icu and the o.r.( in this setting they would probably make more than someone with just 1 cert).
doing both involves around 4 yrs of school after college so you might as well become an md/do at that point in my mind unless you worked as a pa or aa for a few yrs and decided you really wanted to do the duties of the other.
if at the beginning of your career and considering both I would do medschool instead. hope thatanswers your questions.
-e

Let me ask you EMEDPA. How much can a pa/aa make? I see your point about just calling it a day to just go to a MD/DO program insted. The pre-reqs for the AA include Bio-chem, physics 1&2, Orgo 1&2, Chem 1&2, and Bio 1&2.

Thanks,
Mars:thumbup:
 

jwk

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Hello there people. I am wondering. How does it benefit a P.A. to go back to school and become an A.A? I know there is a salary increase but how about in job duties and, would an A.A. get paid more also being a PA or does it not matter? Have you guys ever heard of someone working as a PA and A.A at the same time? For example can a PA work simultaneously as an A.A. ? Does that even exist? :confused:

Thanks,

Mars:thumbup:
PA and AA are different professions, just like NP and CRNA are different.

As an AA, you would usually be working in the OR administering anesthesia. Your compensation will be based on that, not being a PA. That being said, I think you'll see a renewed interest in CCM by anesthesia departments over the next several years, and some of your PA skills might very well come in handy outside the OR if the anesthesia department you work for heads that direction. In addition, there are a number of PA's working for anesthesia departments in their pre-op clinics or pain medicine practices.

There are a quite a few PA's that have gone through the AA programs over the years. A few have gone to states that don't have enabling legislation for AA's, using their dual credentials to land a job there. Florida had several PA/AA's prior to AA legislation passing three years ago.

AA starting base salaries are in the $100k-140k range for a 36-40 hr week, with significant opportunities for OT in many practices. $200k is certainly possible in many areas, but those guys have a little seniority and are working 60+ hr weeks to get there. Some employers may give you credit for prior work as a PA as far as where you enter the salary scale, but otherwise I doubt you'd see any extra pay.
 
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