Paid Dental Residencies? How much?

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by dentistdream, Sep 7, 2001.

  1. dentistdream

    dentistdream Junior Member

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    Hi guys~
    I just would like to know if the students get paid during their residencies such as Orthodontics, etc... just like Med students.
    I know med students get paid around $30,000 to $40,000 per year during their residencies, but do any of you guys know if the dental students also get paid during their residencies?

    2) How about during the General Practice residency(1yr)?
    3)And do you know the salary range during their residencies?
    4)If yes, does the General Practice residency gets paid same as Ortho, oral surgery, etc......? Because Ortho and other residencies are longer or "harder" than the General Practice residency.

    I would like to thank you in advance....
    Bye~
     
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  3. DrJeff

    DrJeff Senior Member
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    Best bet if your looking for the best paid residencies is either a GPR or an oral surgery program in a major city(Northeast average now is 40K plus). Ortho residencies for the most part are non-paid or even your responsible for tuition if its a master degree based ortho program. AEGD(advanced education in general dentistry) on average are in the 20K residency. Perio and Endo programs range from non-paid/ your responsible for tuition on up to about 20K, same with prosth programs.

    On a personal note, the extra experience and confidence that you'll gain in any type of residency will very quickly make up for the decrease in earnings compared to private practice earning potential your 1st year out of school. Typically now, most good practice opportunities require a GPR or a couple of years experience. This is coming from a household where I did a 2 year GPR and my wife did a 3 year Ortho residency.
     
  4. dentistdream

    dentistdream Junior Member

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    Dr. Jeff~
    Why is that GPR(General Pracice Residency) gets paid and Ortho doesn't? It doesn't make sense to me.... Ortho is "harder" to get in than GPR, plus Ortho is 1 or 2 yrs longer than GPR.........
    Thanks
     
  5. DDS2006

    DDS2006 Junior Member

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    dentistdream,

    it makes sense if you consider that Oral Surgery and GPR are both hospital based residencies. Because of this, they receive funding from the hospitals themselves. You are providing a valuable service to them, as opposed to just learning a new skill that will benefit only you in the future (ie Ortho) and that will increase your future earnings potential. That's just my take on it.
     
  6. dentistdream

    dentistdream Junior Member

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    Oh, I see..... Yeah, it makes sense now...
    Thanks a lot~~
     
  7. DrJeff

    DrJeff Senior Member
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    Actually, good old uncle sam pays the accredited residency program(or more commonly the hospital and/or university that the program is based at) roughly $125,000 per resident per year. Certain programs with higher time requirements(GPR's/O.S.) where the residents also make more $$ for the institution will pay more(most programs actually just about break even from the stipend when all the expenses(materials/staff/outside education courses)are paid at the end of the year.

    Other programs with less time demand(I'm talking work hours/call hours per week, not years devoted to the program)that are higher in demand(i.e. ortho, perio, endo) don't need to pay alot, simply because they're in high demand. Oral surgery is the exception since its in very high demand and its "well" paid.(actually my friend who just finished his oral surgery program last June calculated that based on the average # of hours/week he worked, his hourly wage based on his 40,000 a year pay for residency worked out to be just under minimum wage!) On the flip side though, he was generally so busy that he didn't have time to spend much $$ during those years! :eek:
     

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