Shyao

7+ Year Member
May 22, 2009
5
4
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
Lurking around and reading other "Passed NAPLEX!" posts really helped me prep and get a better understanding of the exam, so I decided to make my own post after finding out that I passed today (got a score of 85). Barely passed, but passed nonetheless. I was the C student that crammed the night before exams and didn't remember anything after the exam, so if I could pass, you can too.

My only study materials were the RxPrep book and online question bank. I didn't get the video lectures, although I kind of wish I did, because I was really slow in reading chapters (a couple hours to read one chapter), got bogged down by the details. I had the book for months, but only really started studying a month out, after formally scheduling the exam (ATT took forever). I went through the whole book first, highlighting and also outlining chapters by hand. I paced myself to get through 300 pages a week. Then I went through the online question bank, usually scored in the 60s, and redid the questions I missed. In retrospect, I didn't really retain information the first time around but I was anxious to get through the whole book a couple weeks before the exam. I did that thing where you cut the spine and pages out of the RxPrep book at a FedEx store to put in a binder and carry around individual chapters, because the book is huge and a pain to carry around.

I also used Quizlet.com for memorizing things like brand/generic names, controlled substance status, and warfarin/levothyroxine color. In the final days leading up to the exam, I did the calculations and clinical trial portions of the question bank, and revisited those chapters in the book.

I didn't do the calculations sheet that's sticky'd (because I saw a post saying that it went beyond what's required for the NAPLEX and RxPrep was sufficient), nor did I do Pre-NAPLEX. I did do the 150 question practice exam in the RxPrep online question bank, about a week before my exam, and got a 57% on that.

Day of the exam, I memorized key formulas and conversions from the calculation section, and made sure to jot them down on the scrap paper, first thing when I started the exam. Formula for BEE is given but you still need to know how to calculate TEE (easy because just multiply by stress factor and activity factor). I was not surprised that normal ranges for labs were given, but surprised that normal ranges for drugs (e.g. lithium, phenytoin) was given too. I did get a question for a drug's normal range that wasn't given.

I totally skipped HIV (and opportunistic infections) when studying, but ended up getting a lot of those questions unfortunately and had to guess a lot. I also had a lot of calculations questions (like a third of the exam) and questions on clinical trial analysis (e.g. calculating relative risk reduction, number needed to treat, interpret clinical trial results), which I think RxPrep prepared me well for. Also got questions on compounding and references (e.g. pink book, orange book).

Kind of funny, but during the exam, I would get sets of questions pertaining to one clinical scenario, and it'll start out with "Pick a drug to replace X in the patient's medication regimen" and the next question would start with "Physician wants to do a trial of Y..." so I knew whether I got the previous question wrong. I got 2 bathroom/snack breaks during the exam, first break came after 3.5 hours, I think. The test computer alerts you when it comes time for breaks. Finished the exam after about 4 hours, while taking my time with each question.

All in all, I was pretty relaxed on the day of the exam (good night sleep, ate a good meal, got to the testing site early). I definitely recommend the RxPrep book and the online question bank and especially nailing down calculations.

Good luck!
 

abdc

7+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2010
73
19
Status
When did you take the Naplex and even did you get your results?
 

best0731

7+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2010
3
0
Status
Lurking around and reading other "Passed NAPLEX!" posts really helped me prep and get a better understanding of the exam, so I decided to make my own post after finding out that I passed today (got a score of 85). Barely passed, but passed nonetheless. I was the C student that crammed the night before exams and didn't remember anything after the exam, so if I could pass, you can too.

My only study materials were the RxPrep book and online question bank. I didn't get the video lectures, although I kind of wish I did, because I was really slow in reading chapters (a couple hours to read one chapter), got bogged down by the details. I had the book for months, but only really started studying a month out, after formally scheduling the exam (ATT took forever). I went through the whole book first, highlighting and also outlining chapters by hand. I paced myself to get through 300 pages a week. Then I went through the online question bank, usually scored in the 60s, and redid the questions I missed. In retrospect, I didn't really retain information the first time around but I was anxious to get through the whole book a couple weeks before the exam. I did that thing where you cut the spine and pages out of the RxPrep book at a FedEx store to put in a binder and carry around individual chapters, because the book is huge and a pain to carry around.

I also used Quizlet.com for memorizing things like brand/generic names, controlled substance status, and warfarin/levothyroxine color. In the final days leading up to the exam, I did the calculations and clinical trial portions of the question bank, and revisited those chapters in the book.

I didn't do the calculations sheet that's sticky'd (because I saw a post saying that it went beyond what's required for the NAPLEX and RxPrep was sufficient), nor did I do Pre-NAPLEX. I did do the 150 question practice exam in the RxPrep online question bank, about a week before my exam, and got a 57% on that.

Day of the exam, I memorized key formulas and conversions from the calculation section, and made sure to jot them down on the scrap paper, first thing when I started the exam. Formula for BEE is given but you still need to know how to calculate TEE (easy because just multiply by stress factor and activity factor). I was not surprised that normal ranges for labs were given, but surprised that normal ranges for drugs (e.g. lithium, phenytoin) was given too. I did get a question for a drug's normal range that wasn't given.

I totally skipped HIV (and opportunistic infections) when studying, but ended up getting a lot of those questions unfortunately and had to guess a lot. I also had a lot of calculations questions (like a third of the exam) and questions on clinical trial analysis (e.g. calculating relative risk reduction, number needed to treat, interpret clinical trial results), which I think RxPrep prepared me well for. Also got questions on compounding and references (e.g. pink book, orange book).

Kind of funny, but during the exam, I would get sets of questions pertaining to one clinical scenario, and it'll start out with "Pick a drug to replace X in the patient's medication regimen" and the next question would start with "Physician wants to do a trial of Y..." so I knew whether I got the previous question wrong. I got 2 bathroom/snack breaks during the exam, first break came after 3.5 hours, I think. The test computer alerts you when it comes time for breaks. Finished the exam after about 4 hours, while taking my time with each question.

All in all, I was pretty relaxed on the day of the exam (good night sleep, ate a good meal, got to the testing site early). I definitely recommend the RxPrep book and the online question bank and especially nailing down calculations.

Good luck!
How did you find out your score in the weekend??
 

rafava

PM me for my rxprep vids/question bank access
Jul 30, 2017
7
3
I took my exam on a Wednesday and saw my results on Monday just before 1pm EST. I checked every half hour from 10-6pm on Friday and Monday basically lol
 
Aug 16, 2017
62
10
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Lurking around and reading other "Passed NAPLEX!" posts really helped me prep and get a better understanding of the exam, so I decided to make my own post after finding out that I passed today (got a score of 85). Barely passed, but passed nonetheless. I was the C student that crammed the night before exams and didn't remember anything after the exam, so if I could pass, you can too.

My only study materials were the RxPrep book and online question bank. I didn't get the video lectures, although I kind of wish I did, because I was really slow in reading chapters (a couple hours to read one chapter), got bogged down by the details. I had the book for months, but only really started studying a month out, after formally scheduling the exam (ATT took forever). I went through the whole book first, highlighting and also outlining chapters by hand. I paced myself to get through 300 pages a week. Then I went through the online question bank, usually scored in the 60s, and redid the questions I missed. In retrospect, I didn't really retain information the first time around but I was anxious to get through the whole book a couple weeks before the exam. I did that thing where you cut the spine and pages out of the RxPrep book at a FedEx store to put in a binder and carry around individual chapters, because the book is huge and a pain to carry around.

I also used Quizlet.com for memorizing things like brand/generic names, controlled substance status, and warfarin/levothyroxine color. In the final days leading up to the exam, I did the calculations and clinical trial portions of the question bank, and revisited those chapters in the book.

I didn't do the calculations sheet that's sticky'd (because I saw a post saying that it went beyond what's required for the NAPLEX and RxPrep was sufficient), nor did I do Pre-NAPLEX. I did do the 150 question practice exam in the RxPrep online question bank, about a week before my exam, and got a 57% on that.

Day of the exam, I memorized key formulas and conversions from the calculation section, and made sure to jot them down on the scrap paper, first thing when I started the exam. Formula for BEE is given but you still need to know how to calculate TEE (easy because just multiply by stress factor and activity factor). I was not surprised that normal ranges for labs were given, but surprised that normal ranges for drugs (e.g. lithium, phenytoin) was given too. I did get a question for a drug's normal range that wasn't given.

I totally skipped HIV (and opportunistic infections) when studying, but ended up getting a lot of those questions unfortunately and had to guess a lot. I also had a lot of calculations questions (like a third of the exam) and questions on clinical trial analysis (e.g. calculating relative risk reduction, number needed to treat, interpret clinical trial results), which I think RxPrep prepared me well for. Also got questions on compounding and references (e.g. pink book, orange book).

Kind of funny, but during the exam, I would get sets of questions pertaining to one clinical scenario, and it'll start out with "Pick a drug to replace X in the patient's medication regimen" and the next question would start with "Physician wants to do a trial of Y..." so I knew whether I got the previous question wrong. I got 2 bathroom/snack breaks during the exam, first break came after 3.5 hours, I think. The test computer alerts you when it comes time for breaks. Finished the exam after about 4 hours, while taking my time with each question.

All in all, I was pretty relaxed on the day of the exam (good night sleep, ate a good meal, got to the testing site early). I definitely recommend the RxPrep book and the online question bank and especially nailing down calculations.

Good luck!
Nice congrats! Did you pass the law exam though?
 
Sep 12, 2017
2
3
Status
Pharmacy Student
I took the exam on Sep. 7 2017 , I expected the questions to be more straight forward. Well, the vagueness of the questions was a real obstacle. On the other side the questions were not too complicated and finding the answer was easier given you look up for the information you need from the case fast and apply it.
*I had about 20% of the questions as Select all that Apply.
*Many from Calculation which was easy to master.
*Less than I expected from Infectious Dz, but quite a bit.
*Not too many form HIV Chapters.
*Many from Biostat which was a surprise for me.
*Antipsych, Antiepileptic, Antidepressant, these are so important.
*Drug references like every other four questions, I really messed up in that!!!!.
*Diabetes, Ht, HF, Dyslipidemia, Anticoagulant, CKD, Drug Dose Adjustment usually come together in one case.
*Mechanism of action not too many.
*Chemical Structure probably one or two.
I used RxPrep only for my preparation and passed with 86. Didn't do the PreNaplex, and I felt I can do better on the exam. But it's still passing grade. Study Study Study, this is my only advice. I read the book three times took me about 6 month to finish, but hey I work two jobs and my average daily studying time was 7 hours. The video lectures were really helpful especially when you look at the book while you are listening to the lecture. Do yourself a favor don't be too resourceful in your studying rely on one book do the question banks more than one, try to master the chapter before you start with next, and read the feedback after you answer these about 20% of the Knowledge you need. For those who is interested in Rxprep Resources I have my subscription valid until 01/30/2018.
 

Highly favored

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2017
35
19
I took the exam on Sep. 7 2017 , I expected the questions to be more straight forward. Well, the vagueness of the questions was a real obstacle. On the other side the questions were not too complicated and finding the answer was easier given you look up for the information you need from the case fast and apply it.
*I had about 20% of the questions as Select all that Apply.
*Many from Calculation which was easy to master.
*Less than I expected from Infectious Dz, but quite a bit.
*Not too many form HIV Chapters.
*Many from Biostat which was a surprise for me.
*Antipsych, Antiepileptic, Antidepressant, these are so important.
*Drug references like every other four questions, I really messed up in that!!!!.
*Diabetes, Ht, HF, Dyslipidemia, Anticoagulant, CKD, Drug Dose Adjustment usually come together in one case.
*Mechanism of action not too many.
*Chemical Structure probably one or two.
I used RxPrep only for my preparation and passed with 86. Didn't do the PreNaplex, and I felt I can do better on the exam. But it's still passing grade. Study Study Study, this is my only advice. I read the book three times took me about 6 month to finish, but hey I work two jobs and my average daily studying time was 7 hours. The video lectures were really helpful especially when you look at the book while you are listening to the lecture. Do yourself a favor don't be too resourceful in your studying rely on one book do the question banks more than one, try to master the chapter before you start with next, and read the feedback after you answer these about 20% of the Knowledge you need. For those who is interested in Rxprep Resources I have my subscription valid until 01/30/2018.
We thank God for your success.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

frosted2

C/O 2023 hopeful!
2+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2016
499
425
Under a cozy blanket
Status
Pre-Medical, Other Health Professions Student
Lurking around and reading other "Passed NAPLEX!" posts really helped me prep and get a better understanding of the exam, so I decided to make my own post after finding out that I passed today (got a score of 85). Barely passed, but passed nonetheless. I was the C student that crammed the night before exams and didn't remember anything after the exam, so if I could pass, you can too.

My only study materials were the RxPrep book and online question bank. I didn't get the video lectures, although I kind of wish I did, because I was really slow in reading chapters (a couple hours to read one chapter), got bogged down by the details. I had the book for months, but only really started studying a month out, after formally scheduling the exam (ATT took forever). I went through the whole book first, highlighting and also outlining chapters by hand. I paced myself to get through 300 pages a week. Then I went through the online question bank, usually scored in the 60s, and redid the questions I missed. In retrospect, I didn't really retain information the first time around but I was anxious to get through the whole book a couple weeks before the exam. I did that thing where you cut the spine and pages out of the RxPrep book at a FedEx store to put in a binder and carry around individual chapters, because the book is huge and a pain to carry around.

I also used Quizlet.com for memorizing things like brand/generic names, controlled substance status, and warfarin/levothyroxine color. In the final days leading up to the exam, I did the calculations and clinical trial portions of the question bank, and revisited those chapters in the book.

I didn't do the calculations sheet that's sticky'd (because I saw a post saying that it went beyond what's required for the NAPLEX and RxPrep was sufficient), nor did I do Pre-NAPLEX. I did do the 150 question practice exam in the RxPrep online question bank, about a week before my exam, and got a 57% on that.

Day of the exam, I memorized key formulas and conversions from the calculation section, and made sure to jot them down on the scrap paper, first thing when I started the exam. Formula for BEE is given but you still need to know how to calculate TEE (easy because just multiply by stress factor and activity factor). I was not surprised that normal ranges for labs were given, but surprised that normal ranges for drugs (e.g. lithium, phenytoin) was given too. I did get a question for a drug's normal range that wasn't given.

I totally skipped HIV (and opportunistic infections) when studying, but ended up getting a lot of those questions unfortunately and had to guess a lot. I also had a lot of calculations questions (like a third of the exam) and questions on clinical trial analysis (e.g. calculating relative risk reduction, number needed to treat, interpret clinical trial results), which I think RxPrep prepared me well for. Also got questions on compounding and references (e.g. pink book, orange book).

Kind of funny, but during the exam, I would get sets of questions pertaining to one clinical scenario, and it'll start out with "Pick a drug to replace X in the patient's medication regimen" and the next question would start with "Physician wants to do a trial of Y..." so I knew whether I got the previous question wrong. I got 2 bathroom/snack breaks during the exam, first break came after 3.5 hours, I think. The test computer alerts you when it comes time for breaks. Finished the exam after about 4 hours, while taking my time with each question.

All in all, I was pretty relaxed on the day of the exam (good night sleep, ate a good meal, got to the testing site early). I definitely recommend the RxPrep book and the online question bank and especially nailing down calculations.

Good luck!
Asking for a friend, are the values for stress factor and activity factor provided or do they need to memorize them? Thanks!