Path-wear

Discussion in 'Pathology' started by medinah, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. medinah

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Do all the fields in pathology involve Path-wear (gowns, gloves, goggles, masks, etc.)
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,515
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Yep. Just the other day I was signing out, and I forgot my goggles AND my mask.. it was crazy.:smuggrin:

    Uh no. Pathology uses appropriate protective gear when needed.
     
  4. medinah

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    What percentage of your day do you have protective gear on? I don't think I'm getting a representative exposure at my rotation. And do all the subspecialties in path involve protective gear?
     
  5. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,515
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Grossing / autopsy (10-25% of time) full protective gear.
    Frozens (10%) gloves&scrubs (face sheild and cover if needed).
    Micro or other CP usually just gloves& scrubs, but rarely more.
    Most of the time no protective gear, rarely gloves to handle something.
     
  6. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    djmd you guys wear scrubs on micro? :eek: for the accidents when you stir and pipette poop?
     
  7. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    What do you think we are, some sort of freaks? ;)

    I can't think of a single CP rotation on which I wore scrubs. Even while doing bone marrows I wore regular clothes. I'm that good.

    As for AP,
    cytology = regular clothes
    ME's office = regular clothes

    So since more than half the "fields" or rotations = regular clothes, I don't think the concept of Path-wear really applies. Unless you mean regular clothes.

    Because hell, surgeons and OBs wear gowns, gloves, goggles, masks, etc.
     
  8. medinah

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    When you mean more than half of the rotations involve regular clothes, you mean no scrubs OR head/facegear, correct? And what's ME's office?
     
  9. anencephalic

    anencephalic Brainless User
    Physician 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    I used to gross practically everything (including bigs and placentas) in regular clothes under an apron and some gloves. You don't really need to gross in scrubs. Autopsies are another story. I'd rather have full PPE there.

    ME = Medical Examiner

    Regular Clothes = Regular Clothes, ie no scrubs, OR head/facegear (unless that's what you regularly walk around in:smuggrin: )
     
  10. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,515
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Some people do, mostly just because they can. There are a lot of stains and dyes in micro.

    (plus technically there are OSHA and other federal rules that some protective gear should be used, not micro in particular.)
     
  11. yaah

    yaah Boring
    Administrator Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2003
    Messages:
    27,905
    Likes Received:
    258
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Like the above, I rarely wear scrubs except when I am on the main surg path rotation (which involves frozen sections) because theoretically we have to be ready to go into the OR to show stuff or view things. Sometimes I wear scrubs when I am on call, for the same reasons. Usually on my other rotations which include heavy grossing I am in regular clothes (tie, shirt, etc) with a covering coat or plastic apron. I have never had an accident which harmed any of my clothes.

    Some people just like to wear scrubs, for whatever reason. There are a couple of residents here who never wear anything except scrubs, even on CP, even when they get criticized for it.
     
  12. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    We fulfill those regulations by wearing a "dirty" lab coat when entering "dirty" areas. Plus people in general are much less likely to wear those hospital work coats home than scrubs - which is probably wise given the multi-drug resistant bugs out there.
     
  13. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Regular clothes = street clothes = professional work clothes = shirt +/- tie for the men.
     
  14. dermpathdoc

    dermpathdoc DO Path
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2005
    Messages:
    476
    Likes Received:
    10
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    WIMP...full PPE in autopsy????shees...the docs I worked with wore full street clothes while doing cranium openings.....while saying..OH i had hepatitis B a LONG time ago! I would go...Umm what about HIV, Hep C and CJD??? While wearing my face mask and scrubs and glasses
     
  15. anencephalic

    anencephalic Brainless User
    Physician 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]

    My mentor used to do autopsies in his street clothes with no face mask/splash shield (truly old school) while chewing gum with his mouth wide open. I was running bowel on one case and splashed some on him and he didn't even flinch:cool:
     
  16. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Most important clothing accessory for male pathologists: Bowtie! Never leave home without it, guys!

    Other than that, lab coat will be considered dressing up. In olden days, when I wielded the knife like a Samurai master in the autopsy suite: Full surgery-outfit, with paraphenalia, including splash guard (most of the time). Also, I always wore double surgical gloves.
    The full warrior outfit, however, was for suspected CJD cases, when that was all the scare: Full containment suit, incl. purified air circulation, in special isolation autopsy room. Essentially, I wore a space-suit... Ah, those were the days.
     
  17. b&ierstiefel

    b&ierstiefel Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    11,787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Jeezus tap dancing christ, bowties are so yesterday!
    Yeah, screw the little scalpels...I use the samurai blades for everything whether it's dicing up a large resection specimen or grossing in a prophylactic oophorectomy.
     
  18. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Come now! Bowties are so weird, they're quaint! :p

    Scalpels? Nope. Haven't done autopsies for years now, but back in the days, you'd never see a scalpel in my hand. Made it a point of pride to do everything with my organ-splitting machete like semi-sword. Obvious trick was to avoid any bloodstains at all on scrubs. Takes a bit of practice, but removes some of the pathologist stereotypes. Also, I found that when presenting autopsy finds to clinicians, a pair of oversized tweezers were perfect. Actually bought a bunch of them at a kitchen supply store. Just had to separate the "at work" supply and the "at home" supply... :D
     
  19. b&ierstiefel

    b&ierstiefel Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    11,787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Sorry...refractory period.
    Ugh...wearing bowties...that's when you know the terrorists have won.
    You're weird.
     
  20. CameronFrye

    CameronFrye Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2005
    Messages:
    614
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been told that back in the day, our PD would often barehand autopsy specimens when reviewing a case with the resident, although I haven't personally witnessed this behavior. If you look in an autopsy textbook with pictures of old autopsies, you definitely see people wearing normal clothes and dissecting in bare hands.
     
  21. yaah

    yaah Boring
    Administrator Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2003
    Messages:
    27,905
    Likes Received:
    258
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    We have a guy who does that. Will start asking questions about a specimen, start pointing, and keep moving his finger until he's actually got his finger in the lung or whatever it is. Does the same thing with fixed surg path specimens.
     
  22. SLUsagar

    SLUsagar rock chalk jayhawk
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Messages:
    512
    Likes Received:
    0
    agreed, on an insane monday signout here, residents frequently employ goggles to protect their precision vision from all the flying glass
     
  23. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,515
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Too many slide slappers huh?
     
  24. pathdawg

    pathdawg Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2004
    Messages:
    421
    Likes Received:
    0
    In most fields within pathology, one can wear "regular clothes", which for most pathologists means short-sleaved collar shirts buttoned all the way up, dockers slacks belted up to about the mid thorax, pocket protector, thick glasses taped up in the middle, and white tube socks under cheap, beat-up dress shoes.

    Yup, the ladies sure do love those pathologists.
     
  25. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I've seen more bowties on internists than I have on pathologists.

    I wonder why men's work clothes are so often more a topic of discussion than women's.
     
  26. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    4,703
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Seems there's one at every academic institution!
     
  27. b&ierstiefel

    b&ierstiefel Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    11,787
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Not at mine.
     
  28. djmd

    djmd an Antediluvian
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    1,515
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Bowties are the mark of nephrologists and endocrinologist.

    Men's work clothes are more often discussed than women's because women can wear almost anything and once they put a white coat over it looks appropriate. Men are almost always forced to wear ties.

    Seriously. Women as long as the skirt isn't too short (and no jeans). Put a white coat over it and you are done. Yes yes nylons are annoying, (but you can just wear slacks)

    Unless the dress is casual enough to allow for no tie or the sweater shirt (no tie), guys pretty much have to wear ties.

    That's why at my med school, where Internal Med people who could wear scrubs when on call would almost universally wear the following:
    Women: scrub bottoms and normal dress top. (sneakers and no nylons)
    Men: scrub top (no dress shirt/tie) and slacks so they still had all their pockets.
     
  29. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I have simply never understood the concept of ties :confused:
     
  30. yaah

    yaah Boring
    Administrator Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2003
    Messages:
    27,905
    Likes Received:
    258
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Ties are kind of silly when you think about it. Like a big necklace or something. I believe we have the french to blame for it.
     
  31. anencephalic

    anencephalic Brainless User
    Physician 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2004
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Actually, I think it's the Croatians...
     
  32. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    833
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Could also very easily be the I-talians. They come up with so much beautiful stuff, and so much horrible stuff. Just think of "Man Purses!" enugh said!
     
  33. yaah

    yaah Boring
    Administrator Physician 15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2003
    Messages:
    27,905
    Likes Received:
    258
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Well, even if the croatians did technically start it (I don't know about that either way), I'm sure the french are still the ones to blame because for some odd reason they tended to set fashion trends for the rest of europe to follow many years ago.
     
  34. dermpathlover

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I suppose there are different cultural standards within the US, but anyone who wore a tie to gross would be viewed as a total aberration and likely considered a freak. In fact, people who wear ties ever at my program are viewed with suscpicion.

    Wearing scrubs is fine on any service here, and it is OK to wear jeans and t-shirts for services like micro, chem, blood bank, cytology. The only time you need to dress up a little is when you do FNAs or bone marrows on the floor. Then you ought to wear scrubs or a maybe khakis and a shirt with buttons on them. Understandably a patient wouldn't want a guy in a pink floyd dark side of the moon t-shirt and jeans doing their marrow nor would a woman getting her boob mass needled.

    I have never not worn scrubs on any service. You can't go wrong in scrubs.
     

Share This Page