Pathologist Salary Snapshot 2023

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Med Director New England

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Hi all
I’ve said this before - I don’t have a lot of faith in the various pathologist / MD salary surveys that are out there. Looking to provide some intel for those starting out and those maybe looking to change jobs.

Let’s keep this as informational not a debate about job market. Please be truthful and include as much detail as you would like. I will start.
Feel free to add to the template below

CURRENT SALARY: 330 K annual base + bonus. My total take this year including last years bonus will be about 360K. Bonus is based on productivity and how well overall system does and is not guaranteed

BENEFITS: good. 401K 1:1 match (Roth or traditional) to the IRS maximum. Match immediately vested. Medical insurance provided at low cost to me (~ 5 K annually for family plan; my share) . FSA available.
Good long term disability. 5K annually fund for CME, licenses, dues.

SETTING: employed (no ownership). Multi practice MD group. Mix of hospital and outreach. Outreach is stable - most of the docs employed in the same system (so won’t leave)

LOCATION: New England. Hi COLA area. Median home in any town close to me with good schools 600-750K.

WORK LOAD: busy but not backbreaking. I do about 5-6 K rvus for AP and have a lot of CP oversight and leadership roles. Basically everyone important in the system has my cell and will occasionally call. The path dept is medium sized and we are not micromanaged by the larger group. We do our own scheduling & decide how much time we take off etc (we have decided 8 weeks for vaca and CME off is par). As long as we cover everything no one cares. Work life balance is pretty good can typically be done by 430 PM everyday.

SALARY FIRST YEAR: 134 K
This was at a different job in academia in New England back in the mid 2000s

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My friend: Around 300K (260-280 base plus bonus, “stress free job” as he says, University owned community hospital).
Location: Midwest.
2 side jobs. Works like a dog but he loves money and has mortgage to pay off.
Total salary around: 600-650K
 
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Total cash compensation: $700-800k
Very small private practice, hospital-based.
M-F, 0800-16:00, which includes medical director work.
Workload is about 4000 surgicals/year.
PTO is approx 20 weeks.
No additional benefits (comes out of my TC as a shareholder).
 
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Hospital employed in midwest.
$475K total comp with 8 wks pto.
General ap/cp, 5500-6000 accessions.
 
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Also agree that you're getting a small sample size here and most of the people that will post are going to demonstrate decent jobs or academic postings, so it's either going to frustrate folks that are in crap jobs (if they even peruse SDN), or give med students & residents the impression that numbers like @Pathological_Liar 's are avg/attainable (which they're decidedly not and >95th percentile).
Keep in mind that most pathologists made closer to or over 7 figures up until about 20 yrs ago.
 
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Total cash compensation: $700-800k
Very small private practice, hospital-based.
M-F, 0800-16:00, which includes medical director work.
Workload is about 4000 surgicals/year.
PTO is approx 20 weeks.
No additional benefits (comes out of my TC as a shareholder).
Bro are you on Reddit?
 
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Hi all
I’ve said this before - I don’t have a lot of faith in the various pathologist / MD salary surveys that are out there. Looking to provide some intel for those starting out and those maybe looking to change jobs.

Let’s keep this as informational not a debate about job market. Please be truthful and include as much detail as you would like. I will start.
Feel free to add to the template below

CURRENT SALARY: 330 K annual base + bonus. My total take this year including last years bonus will be about 360K. Bonus is based on productivity and how well overall system does and is not guaranteed

BENEFITS: good. 401K 1:1 match (Roth or traditional) to the IRS maximum. Match immediately vested. Medical insurance provided at low cost to me (~ 5 K annually for family plan; my share) . FSA available.
Good long term disability. 5K annually fund for CME, licenses, dues.

SETTING: employed (no ownership). Multi practice MD group. Mix of hospital and outreach. Outreach is stable - most of the docs employed in the same system (so won’t leave)

LOCATION: New England. Hi COLA area. Median home in any town close to me with good schools 600-750K.

WORK LOAD: busy but not backbreaking. I do about 5-6 K rvus for AP and have a lot of CP oversight and leadership roles. Basically everyone important in the system has my cell and will occasionally call. The path dept is medium sized and we are not micromanaged by the larger group. We do our own scheduling & decide how much time we take off etc (we have decided 8 weeks for vaca and CME off is par). As long as we cover everything no one cares. Work life balance is pretty good can typically be done by 430 PM everyday.

SALARY FIRST YEAR: 134 K
This was at a different job in academia in New England back in the mid 2000s
Case 1.
Total around $500k

Case 2.
Total 1.2 million

Case 3.
Total 700k-800k

Case 4.
>2 million plus substantial equity

All cases fluctuate +/- 100k, and include side gigs. I cannot go into more specifics.
 
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Some numbers for an academic hospital in midwest.
Current for low rank: 260k, no bonus. Will likely increase in the future with academic ranks. No retirement matching. About 4 weeks vaca. Can generally do a week or two CMEs/conferences on top of that, but most people don’t do more than one. Inexpensive and decent medical and dental.
Low-ish volume, but not exactly super cush. I do approx 3500 RVUs per year with about 10% 309s, 30% 307s, and the rest are 305s. Many high-complexity cases, multipart cancer resections, IHCs/specials. Plus some consults. Fairly busy frozens (10-20/day) and light night call add up to about 3-4 weeks per year or less. Tumor boards every other week. Some academic performance pressure, but nothing crazy like in big names. Plenty of extra responsibilities, like admin, teaching, etc.
It is not a high COL by any means, but not very cheap either. After the latest real estate madness, any decent house is upwards of 500k. Many good ones that you would want as a high-income earner are above 700k.
 
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Case 1.
Total around $500k

Case 2.
Total 1.2 million

Case 3.
Total 700k-800k

Case 4.
>2 million plus substantial equity

All cases fluctuate +/- 100k, and include side gigs. I cannot go into more specifics.
Lol only pathologists that make >500K will report their salaries in this thread. You’re dermpath if I remember.
 
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you guys want any data from Canada? Canada is a good place if you are starting out since you're paid almost at the full max rate and your workload is not too crazy.

"salary" - avg 35K a month, but goes into professional corporation. Autopsy and on-call fees extra $.
benefit - none, you are an independent contractor so you pay for your own stuff. 6 wk vacation + 2 wk CME, can take more time off unpaid.
setting - a community hospital, minimal research and teaching. The government pays a "lump sum" each year to the group for all the pathology services rendered, and the fee is divided up amongst "partners" of the group. Lump sum is subject to increases pending negotiation of provincial medical society with provincial government. If more FTE are required, then must re-negotiate group contract with government.
location - east coast Canada
workload - 2000/yr, plus autopsy, on call, admin, QA etc
first year - new recruits are paid at 90% of full salary (see above) for 1 probation year. After passing probation, then paid full salary.
COL - housing avg 300K, on the low end for Canada.
 
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Also agree that you're getting a small sample size here and most of the people that will post are going to demonstrate decent jobs or academic postings, so it's either going to frustrate folks that are in crap jobs (if they even peruse SDN), or give med students & residents the impression that numbers like @Pathological_Liar 's are avg/attainable (which they're decidedly not and >95th percentile).
It is true that if someone is an underpaid scope monkey 🐒, they're unlikely to post it even in an anonymous internet forum. If people get frustrated they're in crap jobs or med students have unrealistic expectations about the field then tough s**t. Get a new job if you're unhappy or go into residency that pays more if that's your goal. Or start a tattoo removal parlor 💘, tree cutting business🌲, or buy a truffle pig🐷. I was being frank about my job. It's not on to me to sugar coat my message and avoid people getting butt-hurt.

Keep in mind that most pathologists made closer to or over 7 figures up until about 20 yrs ago.
7 figures was more like 45 yrs ago. It was CP billing that killed the goose that layed the golden egg 🥚 which was in the mid-late 70s. I wouldn't say most pathologists made 7 figures 20 yrs ago, that's still the early 2000's. But, to your point, even 20 yrs ago we were doing a lot better.

Bro are you on Reddit?
Nah...look for him on Insta drivin' a Lambo...🏎️
you guys want any data from Canada? Canada is a good place if you are starting out since you're paid almost at the full max rate and your workload is not too crazy.

"salary" - avg 35K a month
location - east coast Canada
COL - housing avg 300K, on the low end for Canada.
Good share from Canada. For those of us stateside, I would add to your post to keep things in perspective. 35K/mo. CAD = $25,763 USD or $309K/yr.

The COLA as you mentioned is a huge difference maker, as you are in the East Coast of Canada. I believe the government pay scale is the same for pathologists across the country, correct? So if a pathologist is living in GTA or Vancouver on 309K/yr, that's like living in major U.S. cities with a high COL like NYC, LA, SF on a similar salary (or slightly more). Vancouver is crazy expensive...a lowly pathologist can't keep up with real estate being bought up by trust fund babies and tech moguls driving around in Maserati's from Hong Kong and Taiwan.
 
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It is true that if someone is an underpaid scope monkey 🐒, they're unlikely to post it even in an anonymous internet forum. If people get frustrated they're in crap jobs or med students have unrealistic expectations about the field then tough s**t. Get a new job if you're unhappy or go into residency that pays more if that's your goal. Or start a tattoo removal parlor 💘, tree cutting business🌲, or buy a truffle pig🐷. I was being frank about my job. It's not on to me to sugar coat my message and avoid people getting butt-hurt.


7 figures was more like 45 yrs ago. It was CP billing that killed the goose that layed the golden egg 🥚 which was in the mid-late 70s. I wouldn't say most pathologists made 7 figures 20 yrs ago, that's still the early 2000's. But, to your point, even 20 yrs ago we were doing a lot better.


Nah...look for him on Insta drivin' a Lambo...🏎️

Good share from Canada. For those of us stateside, I would add to your post to keep things in perspective. 35K/mo. CAD = $25,763 USD or $309K/yr.

The COLA as you mentioned is a huge difference maker, as you are in the East Coast of Canada. I believe the government pay scale is the same for pathologists across the country, correct? So if a pathologist is living in GTA or Vancouver on 309K/yr, that's like living in major U.S. cities with a high COL like NYC, LA, SF on a similar salary (or slightly more). Vancouver is crazy expensive...a lowly pathologist can't keep up with real estate being bought up by trust fund babies and tech moguls driving around in Maserati's from Hong Kong and Taiwan.
No butt-hurt here, my numbers are pretty on par with @Pathological_Liar , though the vaca is closer to 12 weeks. Same for all the PP pathologists I know in my region (several dozen). I'm just saying people reading this should be more concerned with the spectrum of income (and, importantly, the mean and mode).

I would say high 6 figure incomes were pretty common up until the late 90s.
 
If anyone feels the need to post their info for this anonymously, you can pm me and i can post for you. Mods all sign NDAs.
 
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Total cash compensation: $700-800k
Very small private practice, hospital-based.
M-F, 0800-16:00, which includes medical director work.
Workload is about 4000 surgicals/year.
PTO is approx 20 weeks.
No additional benefits (comes out of my TC as a shareholder).
20 weeks of vacation and 750K. How’s that possible? CP work? High volume GI or derm?
 
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20 weeks of vacation and 750K. How’s that possible? CP work? High volume GI or derm?
Imagine you have several contracts that pay you $250 per 88305 and you're in a regional where your payor mix of that type of insurance is quite high. Then imagine you work in the ass-crack of the US where an 88305 pays you $35. Location is important. Your carrier contracts are important (especially if you have legacy contracts that massively benefit your group). Volume is super important.
 
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20 weeks of vacation and 750K. How’s that possible? CP work? High volume GI or derm?
CP reimbursement, somewhat favorable med director fees, and our case mix being 70% colon polyps.

I'm sure it won't last, so I save almost 50% of my TC. I'll never be able to work another typical employed path contract again.
 
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A job I know of:

Academic practice offering around 240-250 starting. Busy hospital. Benefits not very good from what I hear. Salary goes to 270 in year 2. Multiple job openings in the group have been unfilled for over a year now. Midwest.

Staffing shortage in the group. Years ago this job would’ve filled. Now I guess people got options.
 
My income as a partner in a large PP with multiple hospital contracts and our own histo lab topped out at ~$700K with “full” benefits before we sold to what became Ameripath in 1996. My income as an employee of Ameripath and, then, Quest(after they bought it) topped out at ~$415K with “full” benefits at my retirement in 2013.
 
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:)
Now-1mil plus, 1000 cases, 26 wks PTO, live in replica of Biltmore mansion but with modern plumbing

1st job - free gruel, 10000 cases, PTO for required training, lifelink always at 2 am, lived in refrigerator box outside morgue
All hail Monty-Python
 
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Good share from Canada. For those of us stateside, I would add to your post to keep things in perspective. 35K/mo. CAD = $25,763 USD or $309K/yr.

The COLA as you mentioned is a huge difference maker, as you are in the East Coast of Canada. I believe the government pay scale is the same for pathologists across the country, correct? So if a pathologist is living in GTA or Vancouver on 309K/yr, that's like living in major U.S. cities with a high COL like NYC, LA, SF on a similar salary (or slightly more). Vancouver is crazy expensive...a lowly pathologist can't keep up with real estate being bought up by trust fund babies and tech moguls driving around in Maserati's from Hong Kong and Taiwan.
Salary is similar across the country for 90% of jobs. There are rare jobs that pay more, but those are not easy to get into, or are in geographically unique locations.

Cost of living is a big factor. I know a 2-pathologist couple in downtown Toronto, each make 375K, yet only able to buy a condo (expensive one for sure, 2BR, 1mil+). He does drive a nice car but doesn't take it to work because some kind soul will donate it for him to Africa the moment he parks it in a public area.
 
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Some info from Reddit:

“I’m in a private group of 5. We all went to top medical schools and placed well in our respective years. We could all have chosen pretty much anything we wanted. This is the thing that others don’t understand. It’s true that it’s something IMGs “settle” for (no offense meant by this, but it’s just a reality) which creates a mixed impression. You just have to ignore that.

I know a fair bit about most other specialties from being a general surgical/anatomic and clinical pathologist. The reverse is not true, and they know it.

I can also promise you that many physicians in other fields that are in their late 40s and 50s are often burned out and disillusioned. I have heard MANY proclaim in the doctor’s lounge that they “should have gone in to path”.

It’s really about knowing yourself, and your priorities.

I only mentioned the top medical schools to illustrate that we all had options and didn’t “settle” for Path. If you’re concerned about the sort of image and ego and adoration physicians in some other fields get then it’s not for you. You probably won’t enjoy it or be good at it.

My earnings in the 20 years I’ve been a partner have ranged from $720-$820k. We work hard and get no benefits (no insurance or retirement). We do that on our own. We are also mercenary. If you don’t work you don’t get paid. Not to jinx myself but I haven’t had a single sick day in 20 years. The only time anyone else has had off is for Covid, and we decided we would not withhold pay for that.

From my experience on here I know I’m lucky and near the top, but $500k plus seems reasonably common. I would do this job for less than I make. Clinicians can deny it to themselves but we are absolutely critical to patient care. I find it fascinating and rewarding, and that’s WHILE not getting much respect. I don’t care.”

Like I said the big ballers are usually the ones to post how much they make (humble brag).
 
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More from Reddit:

“Depends! Some anecdotes to hopefully help:

Some private practice applicants I’ve spoken to who are almost done with fellowship-GI, starting around 300k; dermpath, 400+ (not even as a partner yet!).

Academics range depending on institution and location. Smaller community hospital I’ve recently seen: 150k; southern Illinois community work, 300+ Smaller academic center I’ve seen a couple 200k starting. For others, 230k and 260k. The states were different and this depends on subspecialty.”

Hope this helps! Lots of variability it seems depending on institution, state, and subspecialty.
 
“In my personal experience in major Midwest city, starting offers have been around 220-250k in private practice. Then depends on “partnership “ track, etc. But many private practices are being taken over by large hospital systems and salaried (high of around 400-450k for experienced). I feel like some of the quoted salaries must be in small places or places hard to get people to go. Major cities don’t pay that. You have to decide what you want.”
 
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If anyone here with derm or molecular fellowship want an academic job in Canada, Queen's University just posted 2 job ads. Pay is 376K CAD, but only 70% clinical service (other 30% is protected academic time). From the ad it seems benefits are generous.
*I have no affiliation with Queen's U
 
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This is primarily aimed at the folks trying to enter the field from training.

As a retired, somewhat interested “now outside “ observer, it seems to me that that the critical energy this reaction (getting a desirable job) must achieve before it becomes “spontaneous” is getting a first job. That critical piece of energy is ENORMOUSLY catalyzed by experience. And, it does not seem to me that the quantity or location of that experience is primary. But, it is essential that that experience be demonstrated. In today’s environment, if I were just getting out of training, it seems best to just GET A JOB ( ANY JOB) to punch the ticket for, what I believe, is this (?essential?) step. Too many people are, now, trying to compete for the “good” jobs in an arena in which they are NOT competitive.
This onerous necessity is SOLELY due to the fact that there are just too darned many folks with zero known or demonstrated ability to do the job.
Unfortunately, this adds another couple/few years of the same “delayed gratification“ crap you’ve dealt with for 10-20 years. It is an extremely hard “bullet” to bite but today’s reality must be dealt with.
The image in y’all’s head (I had the same one) that you do your 4 of med school, 4 (now mostly 5 or 6) residency/fellowship and become a sought-after commodity are long gone. That image was rapidly vanishing in the 80’s when I was in your shoes. It is worse now.

The NO DOUBT, 100% MAIN reasons I got a job was my experience, limited as it was. I WASN’T competing with residents/fellows(same thing).
 
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If anyone here with derm or molecular fellowship want an academic job in Canada, Queen's University just posted 2 job ads. Pay is 376K CAD, but only 70% clinical service (other 30% is protected academic time). From the ad it seems benefits are generous.
*I have no affiliation with Queen's U
"70 percent clinical service"
 
This onerous necessity is SOLELY due to the fact that there are just too darned many folks with zero known or demonstrated ability to do the job.
These folks are ‘unknown unknowns’, and are difficult to gauge. Most residency and fellowship directors, if you call them, will give any of their trainees the green light. The exception is in local areas where there is an established pipeline of certain trainees into practices in that area.

It’s really hard to take a fresh trainee (with two fellowships, even) and train them up to speed in your practice environment. Even harder if they’re dodgy, have personality problems, etc.
 
:)
Now-1mil plus, 1000 cases, 26 wks PTO, live in replica of Biltmore mansion but with modern plumbing

1st job - free gruel, 10000 cases, PTO for required training, lifelink always at 2 am, lived in refrigerator box outside morgue
All hail Monty-Python

You were fortunate to have a refrigerator box. We signed out 15 thousand cases a year 14 hours a day working in a shoe box in a septic tank, lab director would thrash us with a belt.
 
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From anonymous user


Salary: $350K, no bonus (well, there is a bonus structure in place for RVUs, but my volume is so low, I'll never reach it...haha). Note: after I signed my contract, the hospital system bumped up new pathologists' salaries due to Post-pandemic inflation and overall healthcare system recruitment issues. But, I just missed the cut. I anticipate upon renewal, I will be in the $450-500K range based on the hospital system's increase and my already current role as medical director.

Benefits: 401K 1:1 match, topped out at ~20K/yr (combined employee+employer). Medical/dental/vision provided. Dental & vision suck, never had to use medical. $3K for CME. No disability.

Setting: Employed, solo. I am part of a healthcare system that has other hospitals with other pathologists, but I never see them, never travel there, never cover for them, and I only sign out my own cases.

Location: Mid-Atlantic, small town, low COLA. Median home is 190-230K.

Workload: Cush. Solo pathology. 2200 surgicals/yr or about 5-10 cases/d or 1 or 2 trays of slides (usually the trays are not full). I do gross, averaging about 30 min-1hr/d, but it's smalls and ditzels i.e. biopsies (GI, breast, skin), gallbags, hernia sacs, appendixes, etc. No big cases/cancer resections. No GU, GYN, Lung, Kidney, Liver, Neuro. No bone marrows. No GYN cytology (2-6 non-GYN cytology cases/mo). No ROSE. Frozens: 1-2/yr...yes, per year, scheduled only. I am always on call when working, but I have never received an after hours call since I took this job, let alone had to come into the hospital. No tumor conference. Only 2 meetings per year. I am medical director at another hospital, and go there once per month and it is about a half hour away. I usually show up to work around 11-12, but have strolled in later. I have about 2-3 hours of actual work per day. So, I kill a lot of time on the on the cell phone, internet, checking stocks, etc. Usually leave around 4.

Vacation: 11 weeks/yr (10 vacay+1 CME)

First job salary: $180K (private group, no bonus 1st year, about 10 yrs ago)
 
Role: Health system employee
Salary: $380k
Bonus: Up to $30k
Medical Director Pay: $15k
Benefits: Cheap medical/dental/vision, good retirement options/contributions
Vacation: 8 weeks
CME: $3k
RVUs: Peaked at ~12k, current estimate is ~7-8k after additional hires
Intangibles: Workplace environment and colleagues are good. Low/no drama.
 
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Employed community hospital in the arctic midwest. Everyone sub-specialized but cover everything. good mix of older and newer pathologists. No psychos or dangerous geezers. reasonable clinicians.

Salary: $385k
Bonus: up to $40k.
Medical Director Pay: $15k
Benefits: medical/dental/vision, matching contributions
Vacation: 6 weeks
CME: $1500
RVUs: Around 12k
 
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If anyone feels the need to post their info for this anonymously, you can pm me and i can post for you. Mods all sign NDAs.
Thanks to all who have responded to this

But there are MANY MORE who haven’t. Note you can send your info to wholeheartedly and they will post anonymously. You can also just be a little vague if you’d like to insure anonymity.

Knowledge is power; let’s go folks - one final push to get more of you to participate

Again let’s just stick to data on your job - save the debate about job market to the many other threads on SDN
 
Salary: $400k, partnership track
Setting: Hospital-based private practice
Location: Southeast
Benefits: Medical/dental/vision/disability/401k
Vacation: 9 weeks
CME: $10k
RVUs: No idea, busy but manageable
 
Anonymous User:

Year in practice: 3.5 (just made partner at year 3)
Salary: Base of approx $400,000 with ability to do extra cases (salary for this year will approach $500,000 with extra cases). Started at about $315,000 3 years ago right out of training.
Setting: Multi-specialty large doctor partnership staffing community hospitals
Location: West Coast
Benefits: Medical (with the ability to vest at 10 years for post retirement medical), dental, vision, disability, 401k, additional partnership retirement account, pension (2% a year that vests after 10 years)
Vacation: 3.5 weeks pre-partner, 4.5 weeks as early partner, 5.5 weeks at 5 years, 6.5 weeks at 10 years; plus get an additional week of education leave
CME fund: none (but since partnership, you can write off conferences and dues)
Surgical cases: Base of appox 7000 cases with extra cases totaling about 10000 cases
 
It is shocking to me how little pto pathology groups offer for a non-patient facing specialty. Rads has an abundance of jobs with 14-26 weeks off.

A minimum of 1 week/month should be standard, but our field is full of people who refuse to innovate their practice in even the most basic ways.
 
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It is shocking to me how little pto pathology groups offer for a non-patient facing specialty. Rads has an abundance of jobs with 14-26 weeks off.

A minimum of 1 week/month should be standard, but our field is full of people who refuse to innovate their practice in even the most basic ways.
If you dont work … hospital or your employer is paying you to go on vacation. If you don’t work, you aren’t making any RVUs and in a productivity based model, no bonuses for you.

The most I’ve ever heard was 12 weeks as a partner in a group. Then I read and spit up my hot morning coffee out of my nose as I read people like Patgological Liar with “half the year off” vacation LOL.

There’s too many pathologists for that to occur.

That’s like asking for 400-500K starting that radiologists grads get. There’s too many of us and you’re asking for way too much. Stop acting like pathologists are a highly sought after commodity lol.

I was offered 2 weeks a year my previous job. I negotiated and got a freaking month. I know of an academic group that is 4 weeks vacation + 1 week CME. The pathologists can’t take vacation when they want because they are short staffed and need service coverage.

Why can’t they hire anyone?

Lowball starting salaries because of greedy senior (owner/partner) pathologist not willing to offer more. In some groups and some areas of the country, it’s a dog eat dog world.

This field is a joke.

(Pathological Liar- this field is full of haves and have nots. You are one of the “haves”. Let me be the first to congratulate you. Congratulations! Your practice set up and volume probably allows you to take that much vacation. Your work can be handled by another pathologist while you are in the beach in Bora Bora).
 
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It is shocking to me how little pto pathology groups offer for a non-patient facing specialty. Rads has an abundance of jobs with 14-26 weeks off.

A minimum of 1 week/month should be standard, but our field is full of people who refuse to innovate their practice in even the most basic ways.
I can relate to this. We have 10FTE and my idea was 5 people do 2 week on, 5 people do 2 week off kinda thing, so yes, 5 people work like a beast for 2 weeks and maybe spend 2-4 days catching up, but then everyone can have at least a week off per month. I thought this was brilliant idea but the old **** in the group just laughed it off lol. These old **** are the kind that still rely on secretary to type their report and consultation letters!

My ideal setup would be a 4 person community hospital rotating 2 people at a time, so basically everyone work 6 months with 6 months off.
 
Thanks to all who have responded to this

But there are MANY MORE who haven’t. Note you can send your info to wholeheartedly and they will post anonymously. You can also just be a little vague if you’d like to insure anonymity.

Knowledge is power; let’s go folks - one final push to get more of you to participate

Again let’s just stick to data on your job - save the debate about job market to the many other threads on SDN
Starting salary is 250-350 for grads at the moment from reading online job ads and forums and talking with friends. Some make less. Some make more. I’m living near one of the tightest job markets in the country. Academics have raised their starting offer from 240 to 260 to stay competitive with other academic programs.

This is contrast to years ago starting salaries were in the 180-200 range (CRAP). The market has changed and Mr Market is talking, favoring grads at the moment.

If you’re making less than 250 at the moment and are not in a low volume practice, you are getting hosed.

Farther away from larger cities starting is more than large cities (common sense). Partnership still 400-600 if you’re lucky to be considered by a group. Rural jobs I’ve seen and have talked to recruiters can fetch you at least 400-450K base salary and that’s without bonuses and other benefits like contribution to retirement. So your looking at 450-500+ in rural areas.

Not sure why you need to know about how much everyone is making or about their benefits? Read forums and look at job ads, you’ll get a sense about salaries at the moment.

You would probably need 50-100 responses to make any meaningful conclusion.

I just saw a 379K job online recently in the Midwest, which does not include bonuses, etc. I also connected with a recruiter who told me the highest starting salary in his Path job postings is 450K in Texas. I’ve seen other job ads for 450-500, one at 525K but in ALL in undesirable locations.

Forensics is making a lot nowadays due to a huge shortage. I saw a job for 400K. Locums one guy was making 250K working 8-10 hours a week!
 
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For those interested in forensics, the demand is there:

One guy mentioned he’s making as much (locums rate) as a neurosurgeon.

(From Reddit)
“I don't know of how much interest this will be to the general medical community, but medicolegal death investigations in the US are stretched to the limit. COVID has put additional strain on a system that was already greatly overtaxed by a decade-long opioid epidemic. Many state offices are approaching a breaking point; it was reported this week that the Baltimore OCME has a backlog of 200 (!) exams to get through. Situations like this are likely to become increasingly common as the number of graduating FP fellows continues to lag far behind national demand.”
 
This is what I'm taking about. Unless it's an academic BST job, I see no reason why a typical pathologist can't sign out 4k specimens in 6-8 months and spend the rest of the year in Bali.

Rads, EM, and hospitalists have long ago shifted to creative scheduling with significant time off. The only reason path doesn't follow suit is because our culture is so sclerotic/traditional that we can't advocate for ourselves. But modernizing our schedules and taking advantage of the insane benefit of indirect pt care should also help improve path applicant quality. If med students knew they could practice 2 weeks on 1 week off in path, it would for sure improve recruitment.

I can relate to this. We have 10FTE and my idea was 5 people do 2 week on, 5 people do 2 week off kinda thing, so yes, 5 people work like a beast for 2 weeks and maybe spend 2-4 days catching up, but then everyone can have at least a week off per month. I thought this was brilliant idea but the old **** in the group just laughed it off lol. These old **** are the kind that still rely on secretary to type their report and consultation letters!

My ideal setup would be a 4 person community hospital rotating 2 people at a time, so basically everyone work 6 months with 6 months off.
 
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This is what I'm taking about. Unless it's an academic BST job, I see no reason why a typical pathologist can't sign out 4k specimens in 6-8 months and spend the rest of the year in Bali.

Rads, EM, and hospitalists have long ago shifted to creative scheduling with significant time off. The only reason path doesn't follow suit is because our culture is so sclerotic/traditional that we can't advocate for ourselves. But modernizing our schedules and taking advantage of the insane benefit of indirect pt care should also help improve path applicant quality. If med students knew they could practice 2 weeks on 1 week off in path, it would for sure improve recruitment.
I've always thought that pathology residency programs should stay unfilled instead of recruiting poor quality FMGs. It would go a long way in improving everything about the field, including remuneraton, research quality and image among prospective applicants.
 
I've always thought that pathology residency programs should stay unfilled instead of recruiting poor quality FMGs. It would go a long way in improving everything about the field, including remuneraton, research quality and image among prospective applicants.
Lol pathology depts need grossing monkeys aka cheap labor. Why be unfilled and hire more PAs when you can get a resident to gross for cheap.
 
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What's the going rate for autopsy in US these days?
Here they only pay <900 weekday and 1100 weekend (CAD). I do it because I have some interest in it and like to keep up the skill in case AI takes over, but I know majority of grads don't want anything to do with it.
 
What's the going rate for autopsy in US these days?
Here they only pay <900 weekday and 1100 weekend (CAD). I do it because I have some interest in it and like to keep up the skill in case AI takes over, but I know majority of grads don't want anything to do with it.
I am AP/FP and do both FP and surgicals. Yes, the demand for FP is currently very high-as high as it has been in the 30 years I have been doing FP. It is hard to find a ME office in the USA that does not currently need additional FP boarded help. Salaries have greatly improved over the last 5+ years, but still generally greatly lack behind the numbers mentioned in the rest of this thread, unless you are a Chief ME, which usually requires 7-10 years of experience. Hard to answer the question about what an individual autopsy pays, as locums positions in FP are not all common and they typically pay a daily rate, which is around $1500/day.
 
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I am AP/FP and do both FP and surgicals. Yes, the demand for FP is currently very high-as high as it has been in the 30 years I have been doing FP. It is hard to find a ME office in the USA that does not currently need additional FP boarded help. Salaries have greatly improved over the last 5+ years, but still generally greatly lack behind the numbers mentioned in the rest of this thread, unless you are a Chief ME, which usually requires 7-10 years of experience. Hard to answer the question about what an individual autopsy pays, as locums positions in FP are not all common and they typically pay a daily rate, which is around $1500/day.
As someone applying to path residency this year and strongly considering FP/NP, would you predict this demand to be still there in 5-6 years? Even if every program in US generated 1 ME per year (doubtful I think) that’s ~120*5 around 700 more by the time I look for jobs. Does that even cover the current national deficit without retirements?
 
So I browsed the NAME job ad board and almost all the job ads offered <300K salary, evening in high COL area like LA. That's just sordid and invective.
 
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Champaign County Coroner is seeking a BC/BE Forensic Pathologist to join their dynamic team in Urbana, Illinois.

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As someone applying to path residency this year and strongly considering FP/NP, would you predict this demand to be still there in 5-6 years? Even if every program in US generated 1 ME per year (doubtful I think) that’s ~120*5 around 700 more by the time I look for jobs. Does that even cover the current national deficit without retirements?
Yes, I would fully expect the demand for FP to remain strong for the future. I think that there are ~50 FP fellows that finish training each year, not all of whom practice full time FP. The demand for FPs has been strong in the 30 years I have been doing FP.

Shikimate-the salaries for FP have actually improved considerably over the last 10 years. I would however agree with you that until they even begin to approach parity with what even an academic hospital AP position pays that there will perpetually be a shortage of FPs.
 
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As someone applying to path residency this year and strongly considering FP/NP, would you predict this demand to be still there in 5-6 years? Even if every program in US generated 1 ME per year (doubtful I think) that’s ~120*5 around 700 more by the time I look for jobs. Does that even cover the current national deficit without retirements?
Fp/NP has historically been a very strong combo for ME jobs. Lots ( for FP) of big names did that. Almost demands at least an academy “affiliation “. I don’t know if this is possible today but it is a bonus if the FP position you are seeking lets you bill for expert testimony.
 
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