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Pcom VS Lecom?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by pamolive, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. pamolive

    pamolive 7+ Year Member

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    Please don't move this to the post-bac forum. I want advise from people who are in the actual DO schools.

    So, I was accepted into PCOM's biomedical sciences program. Hopefully I'll spend a year there, and then move on to their DO school. I'm currently waiting to hear back from LECOM about their postbac program. So, my question is which school do you prefer, LECOM or PCOM. I've seen a lot of threads on here complaining about LECOM, but most don't give specifics about what they don't like about it. Also, did any of you do the biomedical sciences MS program at PCOM? I've heard that they rarely accept anyone into the DO program after one year, and there is only a slim chance after 2 years. Is this true?
     
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  3. PlasticMan

    PlasticMan Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    PCOM hands down.
     
  4. HarveyCushing

    HarveyCushing 7+ Year Member

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    :thumbup: Can't go wrong with that advice.
     
  5. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    There are a lot of people in my class who did the post-bacc at Lecom for a year. 90% of the people who did it were accepted to either an MD school, another DO school, or one of the Lecom locations. I didn't do it, so I can't answer any questions about it, but several of my friends did. Most of them are doing pretty good in school now, too. Personally, I've never been to Erie, and I'm not sure I'd want to spend any time there (I just HATE cold weather), but the people who have been there have been pretty successful getting into one program or another.

    You can listen to all the snobish eletism you want, but you've got to take a look at it yourself and decide on how badly you want to be a doctor. Don't do something that will make you miserable, but I'll still never believe that it really makes a difference where you go to med school. Where you go to residency is what really makes the difference and Lecom has placed some people in pretty damned good residencies. You know, it's really funny now that people are saying they got these wonderful residencies "in spite of" going to Lecom. It just proves my point-- you can get great residencies no matter where you go to school. Some of the people out there who think they got great residencies because of where they went to school might just be wrong. Show me someone who didn't work his or her ass off to get one of those great spots and I'll shut up. The onus is really on you to determine how well you do.
     
  6. Jamers

    Jamers Sexy Man 10+ Year Member

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    I heard the opposite about the biomedical program at PCOM actually. I have a friend that will enter in with your class and the only reason she is doing it is to get an interview for the medical school.
     
  7. mitawa

    mitawa Member 7+ Year Member

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    who completed the PCOM biomed program and are in our 1st year class.
     
  8. group_theory

    group_theory EX-TER-MIN-ATE!' Administrator Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    One advantage of the PCOM biomed program is that one can complete their 2nd year research component while a MS1 at PCOM (several of my classmates got their masters after finishing their thesis during their MS1 year)

    The biomed grads also did well in SPOM (anatomy/histo) and Cell & Tissue (biochem, mol bio, etc) due to previous exposure to the material
     
  9. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    I would ask you to consider if that is true when you are applying to a competitive residency program, especially one at another DO school.

    You can indeed...but it IS harder. Those who have come before you can attest to that.

    You want examples?

    I cant give out too much personal info because the person is an SDN regular but a good friend did not match into any of their top 3 choices for residency because there were questions about a student being the first graduating class from a school.

    scpod...you can hold your opinion and I know you are convinced...we have talked about this before. But, my friend, you are wrong. School has more to do with residency placement than you think. Perhaps its not fair, but its reality.
     
  10. Kuba

    Kuba Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Maybe you guys are in denial and your friend was just a poor applicant? It happens all the time with those cocky pre-allo students who think they got rejected from GWU or something because they were too good for the program.
     
  11. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    COMLEX 93%
    Ranked #7 in class

    Maybe I know what Im talking about because I just went through the residency application process.

    Maybe I have 250+ classmates, many of whom are my friends, who did the same.

    Maybe this person was told in the interview "we dont really have anyone to compare you to."

    Kuba, maybe you just dont understand how things work yet and therefore YOU are the one who is wrong.

    Now what do you think is the most logical answer?

    Thought so.

    :thumbup:
     
  12. Kuba

    Kuba Physician 10+ Year Member

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    :laugh: :laugh: So defensive. I was just throwing out a suggesting. Hence the question mark.


    I did go through the med school application process and I think my parallel still works. Those premeds also have MCAT scores >95% and think everyone in the world would want them at their school:D Maybe it is possible this is also true for residencies.
     
  13. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Not questioning your experience, but I don't quite understand that...isn't the point of a standardized, national test like COMLEX to do just that - compare people from different schools on a common ground?
     
  14. Kuba

    Kuba Physician 10+ Year Member

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    It's just a polite way of saying, " wow, we were really impressed by your numbers, but you turned out to be a creep":laugh:
     
  15. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    Theres more than board scores to an ERAS application.
     
  16. Premedlover

    Premedlover 2+ Year Member

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    PCOM bro!
     
  17. roberts36

    roberts36 New Member 5+ Year Member

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    I'm just finishing up the biomed program at PCOM and just got my acceptance into the DO program last week. It seems your general impression of who gets in is a little off. The vast majority of those that applied last year got in, and so far a fair amount have gotten in this year and we expect more to get in by the end of the school year. It's most certainly not a shoe-in, you just have to do well in the program, have decent ECs and a decent MCAT. Overall, I'd highly recommend the program. The atmosphere at PCOM is outstandingly supportive and as many others have pointed out, the deal with the master's program is pretty good. Feel free to PM me with any questions.
     
  18. EastCoaster78

    EastCoaster78 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    woops double post.
     
  19. EastCoaster78

    EastCoaster78 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    No way, I did the biomed program at PCOM and I'd say more than 70% that applied got in. Also I don't know anyone that hasn't gotten in after the 2nd year. Key is to focus and do well in the program.
     
  20. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    The chance that one person did not match into their top three choices due to being in the first graduating class is astronomical. Their are sure to be plenty of other reasons. One of which is that they chose very poorly when they ranked those choices. Just be cause you have good scores and are in the top of your class doesn't guarantee you a spot. Did this person do rotations or sub-I's at any of them? If so, then that argument about not having anyone to compare them to is a moot point. Saying that they didn't get in because of being from a new school sounds like an excuse. Yes, it could happen, but not at all three. Further, if I was told by the program director that they had concerns about that, then I certainly wouldn't put that as one of my top three choices.

    You know, for every great residency that someone at your school gets, someone else gets a really crappy one. If you are going to say that going to your school was the reason that those people got the great residencies, then going to your school is just as likely the reason why those people got the crappy residencies as well. There's way too much assumption in your argument.

    Yes, you've been through the match, so you know a ton about the logistics of it and how it works. I hope you are still around when I go through it so I can ask you questions. But...you have no clue as to why those PDs didn't pick your friend. There can be a lot of other reasons that neither of you have even imagined. In my past life, I spent a lot of years hiring and firing people. Most people had absolutely no clue as to why they were hired. I turned away people with great resumes and wonderful recommendations simply because I couldn't see myself working with them. The same thing happens in medicine because it is just as much a business as what I was doing before. It's filled with politics, backstabbing, and underhandedness and is still run by a "good ole boys" network. While it is true that your pedigree (hence, your school) can have an effect in some cases, it is by no means the rule across the board. WHO YOU KNOW will always be more important than WHERE YOU GO.

    The thing most people don't realize is that the time to start making those connections for residency is before you even get into med school. Once you are finally in, you need to attend every single convention you can get to and schmooz with every doctor you can. Don't think you can get the sub-I you wanted because your school already scheduled someone for it? Well, I'll guarantee you they'll put you in if the PD calls and says, "I want JP there the the first day of March," then Lucy Lou, who previously had that spot, will be headed to another one.

    Yes, school has something to do with it, especially with some particular residencies. But, for the vast majority of residencies in the US it doesn't. It might mean even more for what you deem "competitive" residencies, but most of the thousands of med school graduates every year have virtually no chance of getting those anyway. They go to a select few. Telling people that they have a better chance of getting one of those if they go to XXXXX school is crap because most people never have a shot at them no matter what. Only the really competive few have a chance at those. You're giving people a false sense of hope by telling them that they have a better chance at getting a competitive residency if they go to XXXXX school. For the most part, the bottom 150 people at your school never had the chance to get that great residency anyway...unless they played the game from the beginning and knew someone important.

    I know that we will always disagree on this, but I won't roll over and play dead. While the school certainly has some importance in some situations, I think you give it far more credence than it deserves.
     
  21. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    We will always disagree. The program directors and attendings for the programs that I applied to all disagree with you as well.

    Perhaps I am making a few assumptions in my argument, but I have the conversations with people who actually make the decisions to support what I am saying.

    Harvard vs Howard, PCOM vs Pikeville. There is a difference.

    I dont think you should be denying the importance of school on ones future. If you want to do so, then thats fine...but be careful about telling premeds that it doesnt matter or its "not a big deal", because it really is.

    I could care less about what you think, but I do care about what is said on SDN regarding this topic.
     
  22. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Not if you're in the bottom 150 people at PCOM. You might have had a better chance by being in the top 5 at Pikeville.

    You didn't apply for the thousands of residencies that the bottom 150 people at PCOM will end up at. Those people never had a chance at a "great" residency from day one. Telling them while they are still pre-meds that they have a better chance by going to PCOM is giving them a false sense of hope.

    I only want to be realistic. Very few people have a chance to get into the program that you did. Very few people who went to PCOM had a chance to get into the program that you did. The rest might just as well have been better off going to a different school for all the good it did them.
     
  23. MaximusD

    MaximusD Anatomically Incorrect Physician 10+ Year Member

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    There is a subjective factor for PDs though. PCOM was recommended to me by a top radiation oncologist in Philly... it has a great rep. The same cannot be said for some other DO schools. To think that this is not true is NAIVE. i'd say even an average applicant from PCOM would probably be better off at attaining a residency in philly than would would another average DO hopeful... seeing as a large proportion of the nation's medical students do part or all of their training in Philly, that is very important...

    I, however, should butt out of this bc I am a lowly MS-0.
     
  24. group_theory

    group_theory EX-TER-MIN-ATE!' Administrator Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    The statistics that I have read mentions that 1 out of 6 doctors in the US did some part of their medical training (whether medical school, residency, or fellowship) in Philly.

    PCOM has been around for a while ... we interact with the other 4 medical schools in Philly ... there are collaboration with the schools with research ... and during your clinical years, you rotate in the same hospitals as Temple, Jefferson, Drexel, Penn, and Penn State students. There are a lot of DO residencies in the philly region so during clinical years, you have time to see various programs (and have them see you) without spending precious elective rotation slots. Strong alumni network spanning the country and globe and in almost every field
     
  25. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Maybe I don't know how to read a match list, but, aside from those schools which seem to have a stronger emphasis on primary care (WVSOM, Pikeville, etc.), I don't see dramatic differences between schools. Certainly, PCOM always has an impressive list, but so do a lot of other schools, including LECOM. It'll be interesting to reconsider this question in 4 or 5 years when there are match lists for all the new schools available. It's always nice to see some data to support a position, rather than just anecdotal evidence.

    Sorry for the threadjack.
     
  26. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    There are indeed differences.

    Look at the programs that grads are going to. PCOM sends a lot of people into osteopathic internships because of the Pennsylvania requirement, but look at where these people go for PGY2. Anesthesia, Radiology, Optho, Derm. I can tell you that most PCOM grads who match into IM end up completing a fellowship in something...Cards, Pulm, GI, Endo.

    scpod mentioned above that being the top 5 at Pikeville is better than bottom half at PCOM, which may be true on paper. But which student is going to have the access to the bigger & better programs? Which student rotates through the hospital several times per year? Which student can turn to recent PCOM alumni working at that institution?

    We havent even begun to talk about alumni. This factor is HUGE. Hospitals, Residencies and PDs in Philadelphia and the surrounding area KNOW PCOM. Most have had little to no interaction with DOs from other schools except for maybe UMDNJ.

    PCOM has been putting out alumni for 108 years. Most of those who graduated in the early 1900s arent alive anymore, but our class size has been in the hundreds for 30+ years. Most of those doctors stay in Pennsylvania, but PCOM has alumni practicing in almost every state and in several foreign countries. PCOM alumni helped to start many of the newer DO schools.

    As far as access and training, DO schools are not equal either.

    PCOM own one of only 24 laparascopic simulators currently in the US, the ONLY DO school to have one and the only school in Philadelphia to have one (Jefferson, Temple, Drexel and PENN dont have one). We have 2 patient simulation robots as well as chest tube, central line and other procedural teaching modules. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in teaching equipment that are being used by first year medical students. I recently worked with a PGY5 surgical resident who has never touched a laparoscopic simulator (she went to another school...an MD school). Our students are using it BEFORE they even start rotations.

    When you have almost half the number of hospitals in a few miles of your campus than some schools have in the entire STATE, that says something. That says you have access, familiarity, alumni support and opporunity.

    Medicine is very much about who you know...sometimes moreso than what you know.

    I guarantee if you ask 10 attendings "If I want to specialize, should I go to a medical school in (insert major metropolitan area here) or in (insert small town in rural state here)?", they would pretty much agree that bigger city, bigger school, better known school is the way to go.


    This issue is frustrating, especially when the counterpoint is argued by students who have not yet gone through the process and talked to people about this. Honestly, I dont even know why I continue to type the same thing over and over about this. A few people hang on to the idea that where they are for medical school right now doesnt matter and that all doors will be open to them. It doesnt work that way. We as DOs have doors that are not readily open to us. One of the best ways to oil those hinges is to place yourself in the best possible environment to overcome stereotype and disadvantage.

    Your choice is medical school is a huge factor in determining the course of your future. Anyone who says otherwise is being naive, likely because they have not seen first hand how this all plays out. I have.
     
  27. McDoctor

    McDoctor Over One Billion Cured 5+ Year Member

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    Obviously, there is a huge difference between Philly and Erie in terms of size of city and weather. You need to decide which you prefer in that respect.

    As far as reputation of the schools, hands down PCOM has been around longer and has the better reputation. And I'm a LECOM grad saying this.

    I think your concern about how many post-bac's PCOM accepts from within is a valid one. This is what you need to find out. The main reason to do a post bac, IMO, is to get into med school. When I was at LECOM, they accepted all of their post baccs. This was back in 1999 and the postbac program was pretty small (less than 10, I'd say). Things may have changed since then.
     
  28. JonnyG

    JonnyG IN the hospitals.... 7+ Year Member

    Are Clinical Education Department would laugh in their face. They don't allow anyone to interfere with the process set up by the students. They do this year after year. Students meet in small groups and then figure away to divy up their rotations. If you don't get what you want you didn't play the game right. PCOM pays the hospitals to take the students, so its not like the hospital is going to risk that income for one student.

    The fact still remains that PCOM name opens alot of doors even for number 276 in the class. Its understandable that you are defensive going to a newer school, but not one of the PCOMers on this board has belittled your education. You can't deny that someone at PCOM will have an advantage going into residency application program then someone from LECOM without doing nay work (if you make your connections to even the playing field good for you)
     
  29. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    I'm certainly not questioning that more established school = more support, more access, more opportunities, and I don't really think scpod is either. The part of JP's post that is a tough pill to swallow is the statement that even if you are top in your class, kill the COMLEX, and rock your rotations, you are still basically screwed because you decided to attend a new school. Maybe this is the truth of the situation; I have no experience with which to argue, but I fully hope and intend to be proving this opinion dead wrong in a few years. In any case, as I mentioned earlier, the proof'll be in the pudding, or in this case the match lists of the new schools.

     
  30. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    I didnt say that.

    But it adds an element of question to an otherwise impecable application.

    And when youre a DO in an MD world, you dont need that.
     
  31. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Not directly, but giving the example that someone ranked 7th in their class with a 93% COMLEX can expect to be turned away from competitive programs seems to me to essentially be saying new school = you're screwed no matter how good you are.
     
  32. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    :rolleyes:

    If thats all you got out of my posts then I am indeed wasting my time posting here.
     
  33. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    I'm not really sure where that's coming from. I appreciate your opinion enough to ask an honest question about it. Sounds like you're very happy with where PCOM's gotten you to - that's great. Hopefully, with a lot of hard work and some luck, we can all achieve a similar level of satisfaction. I'm trying to pick up as much advice as I can to make that happen. Not much I can change about where I enrolled at this point, though, nor, honestly, would I want to.
     
  34. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    Flat out truth: As a DO in this world you need every single thing working in your favor from grades to boards to LOR. Recommending someone go to a newer, less known school over one of the "DO Powerhouses" is dangerous. Again, you need absolutely everything in your favor if you want to be successful.
     
  35. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    No, it's not the "truth" just because you believe it to be. If your desire is to get some wonderful surgical residency somewhere (like your's is), then you're right. You probably do need all the advantages that you can get. Yet, plenty of those people who have the desire to do just that do well regardless of where they went to school. But, why is it so hard to understand that not everybody wants that? Are you not a "success" if your desire is to practice Family Practice in a Texas border town? Do you really think somebody needs the PCOM network to "succeed" in that? Sure, having an alumni network can be beneficial in some circumstances, but I could never go there. Yes, I think it's a great school, but I hate cold weather and it's way too over priced for me. For me, going there would be a total waste of money and I'd be miserable.

    I may be in a unique situation because I'm a lot older than the average SDN poster. I had another successful career before I decided to go to med school. I have a group of friends that I've known for years who are doctors: two orthopaedic surgeons, one pediatrician, two cardiologists and one OB/GYN (2 DOs and 4 MDs). We played golf together, ate at each other's houses, and spent weekends on camping trips together. Every single one of them has been in practice for over ten years. Every one of them also told me that I should go to the cheapest school I could find (although a couple tried to get me not to go to med school at all when I first came up with the idea). I didn't actually choose the cheapest school, but I did come close. These aren't just people I've met and taked to about the profession. I know their wives, children, and families too. I have their cell phone numbers. They send me birthday cards. None of them went to a "powerhouse" school, but I'd consider them all to be sucessful. They don't always agree, but none of them really consider where you go to med school to be that big of a deal. I tend to listen to them because they are my friends, and they've been there.
     
  36. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    Im done stating my point. You can continue to argue this one amongst yourselves. I know what the people making decisions think, and they are the ones that you need to listen to. Not premeds, 1st & 2nd year med students or your buddies on the 18th hole. Listening to them wont secure you a spot in the match.
     
  37. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Yes, but this isn't just buddies on the 18th hole. It's doctors who have finished medschool, gone through the match, completed residency, and evn fellowships in a few cases-- now they have succesful practices. Those aren't just buddies on the 18th hole.

    I got an the phone this morning and performed a little survey. They all still say if they had to do it all over again that they'd just pick the cheapest school because it really doesn't matter which one you go to. Then I asked if they had always held this opinion. The answer to that was pretty much, "no". That's a conclusion that they have reached after being in practice for a few years and having families and other responsibilities. Who knows? Maybe when you are a little older and have gone through the same things, maybe you'll feel the same way that they do...or maybe not.

    I'm glad that you know what people think, but I think that sometimes you just don't have enough tolerance for people who disagree with you.
     
  38. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    I have tolerance and I respect your opinion. But your opinion is largely based on conversations with docs in PRIVATE PRACTICE where mine is based on conversations with RESIDENCY DIRECTORS.

    Apples to oranges.

    You think Im talking out my ass. I am reiterating what was explained to me by program directors from some of the more competitive residency programs in the city of Philadelphia. And those are the docs who give the yea or nay to your residency application, not your friends in private practice.

    So you arent only disagreeing with me, you are disagreeing with the people who make the decisions on which students to accept as residents. No offense, but Im going to stick with their opinion.

    I dont know how more clear I can be about that. Your friends opinions on this particular issue are irrelevant. Talk to PROGRAM DIRECTORS, then come back and tell me I was wrong.
     
  39. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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  40. bkpa2med

    bkpa2med 10+ Year Member

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  41. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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  42. scpod

    scpod Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    You can't 'cause I want to fight over who has the last word in this :D .
     
  43. MaximusD

    MaximusD Anatomically Incorrect Physician 10+ Year Member

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    I won't. I think that the bottom line is that it's not fair to assume that you will want the same thing when you're applying for residency as you do when you enter school.

    What is the takehome point? The decision you make when entering medical school may not be based upon the correct factors.

    Why is this? Because the factors which influenced your choice of school may not be the factors that are important when you apply for residency.

    How can this play out? You apply to X school which has only been around for 2 years and is awaiting accreditation. X school is in a rural area and is relatively unknown. You enter medical school think that this is unimportant, because all you want to do is "become a physician." Three years later, after you've busted your ass for three years doing scut work and memorizing the minutiae of neurophysiology, you may decide that what you really want it to be a neurosurgeon for all the hard work that you've done to be in the upper quartile of your class. Now you're in a situation in which "most normal applicants" can get into what they want. However, that normal applicant IS NOT YOU. YOU WANT MORE, but your hands are relatively bound by the limitations of that school.

    Now, this case was illustrative and easily refutable. But I think it's just important to realize that...

    It is best to keep as many options open as possible.

    What does this mean?

    Find the school with the largest alumni network with the greatest recognition. This way, IF YOU NEED IT the help will be available. For the one percent of fourth-year students entering the match who are teetering on the edge of being competitive for the residency positions, that additional push may be (and pardon this) just what the doctor ordered.

    I know I'm a lowly MS-0, but I'm not stupid and any attempt to refute my argument based upon my age/experience will be met with intense skepticism.
     
  44. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

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    Max's post is along the lines I am thinking of as well.

    Most people who enter medical school will change their minds at least once as to specialty choice. I know I did.

    Going to the most primary care oriented school because you want to do FP is a great fit...unless you change your mind. Then what? Youre in the middle of a rural state at a small medical school not well know outside your area, and now you want to apply to Orthopedic Surgery residencies. Oops.
     
  45. pamolive

    pamolive 7+ Year Member

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    Dec 5, 2006
    Philadelphia, PA
    Wow, thanks for all the info everyone. I am not exactly sure what I want to go into, so I think I need to do whatever possible to make sure that I will have every option open to me when the time comes for residency. Because of that, I think I'm going to go with PCOM. Thanks again. I've heard great things about both schools, that's why it's a hard decision for me.
     
  46. Phoen7ix

    Phoen7ix 2+ Year Member

    13
    0
    Feb 2, 2007
    Well, I'm NOT sure who you've heard from yet....But I DID finish the LECOM Post Bac, felt that it was REALLY good preparation (work but NOT impossible) and certainly casual and not very stressful.

    I interviewed March 8th and received acceptance March 16th into the PBL program (and I think that was only top 20 in my class of 65). Most of my friends got accepted and enjoyed the program, as well, and certainly with lower scores and less on their plate. We are all over 30 yo, with lives going on outside of school.

    I can say that the biggest complaint was the mandatory classes, but then again, you DO want to get into med school, and this is the very SMALLEST of hoops one will jump through through the rest of our lives as physicians.

    Basically, those who complained obviously didn't appreciate the second chance LECOM gave them to reach their dreams....Too bad! What ever happened to earning what one gets?
     
  47. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

    5,910
    29
    Feb 4, 2000
    :thumbup:

    Congratulations
     
  48. niceguydoc

    niceguydoc Member 10+ Year Member

    81
    0
    Mar 29, 2003
    I'm graduating from lecom, erie and having gone through the match and survived it unscathed I can assure you soon to be or current OMS 's that it really doesn't matter which DO school you attend. I was initially choosing between nycom, pcom and lecom. I'm from NYC but ultimately decided on matriculating at lecom. I had my personal reasons for going to lecom and in the end I realized it didn't matter b/c I matched at my # 1 choice. I have friends at the aforementioned schools and they also accomplished what they set out to do.

    Each school has its advantages; If you're comparing lecom & pcom, this statement holds true. Pcom is by far more reputable and established. If you attend lecom, you'll be 40-60 g's less in debt after you graduate. If you look at the match list, its about the same, I wouldn't say one is more impressive than the other. It just depends on what you're looking for in a school, the location you want to do your residency at, etc. Ultimately it is up to YOU to make it happen. I am satisifed with the education I received at lecom. I don't think if i attended pcom I would have gotten anything more out of it than what I did at lecom. Remember you're going to be lumped into the DO/ second class citizens when you're applying for allopathic residencies regardless of which DO school u went to. It's simple as that. Its up to you to excel and make yourself stand out from the pack.

    :D
     
  49. UIC Killa

    UIC Killa EM ES ONE 5+ Year Member

    315
    0
    Apr 15, 2006
    PCOM:thumbup:
     
  50. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    1,679
    7
    Nov 20, 2004
    :thumbup:
    :thumbup:
    ?
     
  51. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

    5,910
    29
    Feb 4, 2000
    Where did you match?
     

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